Class Schedule

Use the navigation menu below to see the classes offered for the selected quarter. If you do not want classes from a certain campus, unselect that campus under "location."

The number of seats available is refreshed every thirty minutes.

Hybrid classes meet both in person and online. If a hybrid class meets daily, it does not necessarily meet in-person every day.

Quarter

Program

Instructor


Keywords


Starting After

Ending Before

Credits

Location

Availability



Other Offerings

Adult Basic Education Classes

Continuing Ed Classes

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I

ACCT&201

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49C1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 30, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20
4921 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Dorum, L. Bldg. 11, Rm. 144 July 1, 2015 Aug. 30, 2015 MW Hybrid $25 9/20

Credits: 5

Covers fundamentals of accounting theory and practice, including a study of the accounting cycle and the use of special journals. Focus is on double entry accounting system and financial statement preparation. Covers transactions for a business organized as a sole proprietorship and the effects of transactions on balance sheet accounts. Prerequisite: ACTG 115 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Using the appropriate accounting concepts and principles, following the accounting equation and based on the type of business entity prepare the proper financial statements
  • Prepare a chart of accounts based on the entity's accounting requirements; following analysis of the flow of the accounting data prepare various journals and post to the ledger; prepare and use a working trial balance to discover accounting errors
  • Using various concepts and principles as appropriate prepare adjusting entries based on the entity's nature, prepare an adjusted trial balance based on these entries and the proper financial statements
  • Prepare adjusting, closing and reversing entries, financial statements, a post-closing trial balance and using financial ratios analyze the financial position of the entity
  • Using source documents of a merchandising entity prepare and post entries to record purchases, sales and inventory adjustments using both the perpetual and periodic systems of inventory; prepare a working trial balance, interim statements and financial statements and using financial ratios analyze the financial position of the entity
  • Cost (value) the inventory using the three most commonly accepted methods; LIFO, FIFO and Average-Cost under both the Perpetual and Periodic Systems
  • Define and differentiate between manual and computerized accounting systems, analyze the accounts to recommend when either system or a blend of systems should be used, discuss and use the various special journals and use the General Journal as needed
  • Define and discuss Internal Control, use methods of Internal Control including bank reconciliations, a check book and an imprest cash account
  • Prepare and record special journal entries for accounts receivable and notes receivable, prepare an estimation of uncollectible receivables using both write-off methods, calculate interest and discounts on notes, properly classifying accounts receivable and notes receivable and prepare financial statements, using financial ratios analyze the financial position of the entity
  • Prepare and post appropriate journal entries to record the acquisition, depreciation/depletion/ amortization and disposal of capital assets; natural resources and intangible assets; prepare an asset schedule for various assets to include land, land improvements, building, equipment and personal property using several depreciation methods; and prepare financial statements following the posting of the above entries
  • Account for liabilities including estimated and contingent, prepare a payroll including associated liabilities, payroll taxes, fringe benefits, vacation pay and pensions, journalize and post the payroll, liabilities and calculate interest due on a note payable

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II

ACCT&202

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49D1 Arranged Arranged Cooke, S. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Online $25 1/20

Credits: 5

Covers fundamentals of accounting theory and practice, continued from ACCT& 201. Focus is on issues related to businesses organized as a partnership or corporation and their effects on balance sheet accounts. Also covers investment, dissolution and distribution of income. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of a Corporation prepare journal entries for the creation of a corporation, issuing both common stock and preferred stock, calculate and account for dividends, prepare the Equity section of a Balance Sheet, evaluate rate of returns, book value and account for corporate income taxes
  • Describe and illustrate journalizing and posting for stock dividends, stock splits and Treasury stock activities; restrictions on and appropriations of retained earnings; and prepare and analyze a corporate Income Statement
  • Describe and illustrate corporate presentation of long-term liabilities to include types of bonds, issuing bonds at a discount or a premium, bond interest expense and presentation of bonds on statements, methods of amortizing discounts and premiums
  • Describe, illustrate, prepare and analyze a Statement of Cash Flow using the direct, indirect, and work sheet approach
  • Describe, illustrate and prepare different types of financial statement analysis to include horizontal, vertical, common-size, benchmarking and ratio analysis
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of a partnership and the basic accounting system for a partnership; prepare appropriate journal entries for the formation of a partnership, division of income (loss), admission of a new partner, withdrawal of a partner and dissolution of the partnership

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING III

ACCT&203

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49F1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 30, 2015 Arranged Online $25 4/20
4931 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Dorum, L. Bldg. 11, Rm. 144 July 2, 2015 Aug. 30, 2015 TTh Hybrid $25 6/20

Credits: 5

Introduces the theory of cost accounting and an analysis of accounting data as a part of the managerial process of planning, decision-making and control. Emphasis is given to job order, process, standard-cost accounting data, and the preparation and use of budgets and internal control reports necessary for making economic decisions for manufacturing businesses. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or instructor approval

Course Outcomes

  • Define terms and identify/distinguish between financial and management accounting concepts; service, merchandising, and manufacturing companies; direct, indirect, and product costs; prepare financial statements for various types of companies; and apply the concept of business ethics to business situations
  • Define terms and identify/distinguish between process and job costing; use a job order cost system to account for materials, labor, and manufacturing overhead; calculate the value of work-in-process, finished goods inventory, and cost of goods sold using a job order costing system; journalize appropriate entries; and prepare financial statements for a manufacturing company
  • Define terms and identify concepts relating to process costing; follow the flow of costs using equivalent units through the process using the LIFO, FIFO, and weighted average methods; and prepare appropriate reports
  • Define terms and identify concepts relating to cost behavior patterns and sales mixes; using cost-volume-profit analysis calculate the break even point, sales needed to earn a target income and margin of safety; and prepare income statements using the absorption and contribution approach
  • Define terms and identify concepts relating to forecasting, budgets, performance reports, and responsibility centers; prepare an operating budget using sensitivity analysis, a financial budget and a performance report; and allocate service department costs to production departments
  • Define terms and identify concepts relating to flexible budgets, standard costs and variances, prepare a flexible budget, income statement performance report and standard cost income statement, calculate and analyze standard cost variances
  • Define, identify and use Activity Based Costing (ABC), Just-in-Time (JIT) Costing, Continuous Improvement and Quality Management to prepare reports and analysis to assist managers in making decisions
  • Define, identify and use the concept of Relevant information and Capital Budgeting tools, Payback, Accounting Rate of Return and Discounted Cash-Flow Models to make and analyze reports to assist managers in decision making to include short term decisions such as Special Sales Orders, Make or Buy, Outsourcing, etc

BASIC MATHEMATICS; BASIC PHYSICS; WEIGHT & BALANCES

ACM 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09F1 Arranged Arranged Perse, B. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $75 4/18
09B1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $50 11/18

Credits: 5

Perform all of the mathematical computations required in the Advanced Composite Manufacturing curriculum. Understand the scientific principles that apply to the operation of aircraft, engines and the equipment that the Advanced Composite Manufacturers will be in daily contact with. Develop a comprehensive understanding of the importance of weight and balance to aircraft safety, and make all of the required calculations for weight and balance checks, equipment changes, extreme loading checks and the addition of ballast.

Course Outcomes

  • Extract roots and raise numbers to a given power
  • Determine areas and volumes of various geometrical shapes
  • Solve ratio, proportion, and percentage problems
  • Perform algebraic operations involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of positive and negative numbers
  • Use and understand the principles of simple machines; sound, fluid and heat dynamics; basic aerodynamics; aircraft structures; and theory of flight
  • Perform complete weight and balance check and record data

BLUEPRINTS, DRAWINGS, AND PRECISION MEASURING

ACM 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09G1 Arranged Arranged Perse, B. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $75 4/18
09C1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $50 10/18

Credits: 4

Determine and identify dimensions of a part from drawings, including orthographic and isometric projections. Sketch objects/parts in either orthographic or isometric views.

Course Outcomes

  • Determine Dimensions of a part from a drawing
  • Identify key aspects of orthographic projection
  • Identify key aspects of isometric projection
  • Sketch an object in both orthographic and isometric views

MATERIALS AND PROCESSES/LAB & EQUIPMENT SAFETY

ACM 115

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09H1 Arranged Arranged Perse, B. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $75 4/18
09D1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $50 10/18

Credits: 5

Advanced Composite Manufacturing students will identify and determine the proper use of fasteners, demonstrate a basic understanding of aircraft hardware identification and terminology, lab safety and the proper use of tools, calculate/apply torque values, and perform precision measurements.

Course Outcomes

  • Determine the proper use of fasteners used in the aerospace and composites industry
  • Demonstrate an understanding of aircraft hardware identification and terminology
  • Calculate and apply torque values
  • Perform precision measurements
  • Demonstrate an understanding of lab safety through written and performance based evaluation
  • Determine and demonstrate the proper use of the following tools: Drills; presses; stone grinder; belt and disk sanders; bandsaw; die grinder; plunge-style router; pneumatic hand drill; pneumatic hand-held sanders; and fabric cutting devices

COMPOSITE FABRICATION

ACM 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09N1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 20/21
09J1 11:30 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 8/18

Credits: 4

Learn manufacturing methods and processes commonly used for the fabrication of composite materials. Instruction includes material choices, fabrication techniques, material handling and safety procedures.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand the benefits and limitations of composite material
  • Be familiar with the common manufacturing processes for composite
  • Identify and utilize the materials to construct a composite laminate
  • Identify and utilize all ancillary materials needed to construct a composite laminate
  • Understand basic tooling techniques as in mold and trim fixtures
  • Understand and demonstrate proper material handling protocols
  • Understand and demonstrate safe use of materials and chemicals

COMPOSITE ASSEMBLY

ACM 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09P1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 20/21
09K1 11:30 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 7/18

Credits: 4

Identify and utilize appropriate materials and processes to assemble structures made of composite materials. Includes room temperature and elevated temperature bonding, drilling, countersinking, and installing mechanical fasteners and potted fasteners.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand common assembly techniques
  • Perform proper bolt assembly tasks
  • Understand bonded assembly manufacturing techniques
  • Identify materials used in bonded assemblies
  • Perform the tasks required to manufacture a bonded assembly
  • Identify tools and fasteners used in bolted assemblies. Follow safe work practices

COMPOSITE REPAIR

ACM 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09L1 11:30 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 7/18
09Q1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 20/21

Credits: 4

Inspect, test, and repair composite structures. This course explains how imperfections affect composite properties and provides hands-on training for the repair of defects.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and evaluate damage on composite structures
  • Prepare the structure for proper repair
  • Identify the materials required in the repair
  • Perform the tasks required in assembling the repairv
  • Safely use the chemicals and materials
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the necessity to follow proper repair techniques and protocols

SPECIAL PROJECTS

ACM 145

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
09R1 4 p.m. 8:15 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 20/21
09M1 11:30 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Conway, J. South Hill Campus Room 119 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 7/18

Credits: 3

Develops skills in print reading, project planning, layout, distortion control, fixturing and other fabrication techniques. Students will have the opportunity to apply knowledge to projects of personal interest and/or as assigned.

Course Outcomes

  • Create or Interpret drawings/prints and plan fabrication requirements of all component models, parts and assemblies for a student designed part/project
  • Create a manufacturing plan for prototype or production, demonstrating knowledge of scope work, balanced lay-ups and issues related to a given part
  • Fabricate tooling layup mandrel (mold)
  • Fabricate part using layup mandrel to faithfully represent design
  • Indicate techniques used to prevent voids and other laminate draws
  • Demonstrate competency in vacuum bagging technique
  • Demonstrate safe work habits and the proper use of tools and equipment

PANEL REPLACEMENT

ACT 132

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9601 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 6

Covers the fundamentals of replacing hoods, bumpers, fenders, grilles, lids, and other bolted-on panels.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Remove & install, and adjust hoods, fenders, deck lids, bumpers and other bolt-on body parts, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • List the various methods of attaching and adjusting mechanically fastened panels, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

PANEL REPAIR

ACT 133

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9611 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 6

Covers metal-straightening fundamentals, including proper tool usage; application of fillers; and sanding for proper size, shape and texture.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, students will demonstrate proper hammer and dolly use to straighten minor sheet metal damage
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, students will demonstrate proper application of plastic body fillers and sand them for size, shape and proper texture

AUTO COLLISION MAJOR REPAIRS

ACT 134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9621 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 5

Introduces vehicle damage measuring systems, straightening auto body structure and replacing structural components.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Explain how impact forces are transmitted through both frame and unibody construction vehicles, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Describe how to visually determine the extent of impact damage and list the various types of body measuring tools, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Analyze damage by measuring body dimensions and identify impact damage to mechanical components on collision damaged vehicles, with a minimum 70 percent accuracy
  • Explain the importance of the datum plane and centerline as related to collision repair and use these concepts to interpret body dimension data, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Diagnose various types of damage, including twist, mash, sag, and side sway, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Demonstrate the use of various collision specific measuring tools, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • List the types of straightening and aligning technique, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Identify signs of stress/deformation and determine if a repair or replacement can be done before, during, or after straightening, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Describe the basic procedures for replacement and corrosion protection of structural components, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

TOPCOAT REFINISHING

ACT 154

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9631 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 10/18

Credits: 8

Covers color matching, final masking, surface cleaning and topcoat finishing.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Explain the difference between spot, panel and completer refinishing, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Describe how to spray different types of materials with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will be able to properly locate and extract color information from a vehicle and outline general topcoat application procedures, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Identify techniques and perform proper masking, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Recognize custom painting and refinishing techniques, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Apply decals, pin striping, wood-grain transfers, moldings, and trim emblems, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Match color and texture with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Identify the steps applying various types of color coats with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Apply base coat and clear coat systems with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

SURFACE IMPERFECTIONS/EXTERIOR TRIM

ACT 166

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9641 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 10/18

Credits: 5

Covers paint-application problem solving, final detailing, decals and trimming.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will demonstrate the ability to explain the final detailing procedures, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will demonstrate the ability to recognize the correct defects occurring in a paint finish, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will demonstrate the ability to explain the importance of final touchup and cleaning to the satisfaction of the customer, with a minimum 70% accuracy

PLASTIC REFINISHING

ACT 171

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
9651 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 301 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 10/18

Credits: 5

Covers paint-shop equipment and painting fundamentals as they relate to plastics.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the students will be able to describe how to spray different types of materials on plastics, with a minimum of 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will be able to properly locate and extract color information from a vehicle and outline general topcoat application procedures on plastics, with a minimum 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, students will match color and texture on plastics with a minimum of 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, students will apply base coat and clear coat systems on plastics with a minimum of 70% accuracy

ELECTRONIC BUSINESS MATH

ACTG 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49A1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 2

Covers business math applications including payroll, percents, merchandising, consumer credit, simple and compound interest, prorating, stocks and bonds, and the metric system. Students will use the keyboard functions and the touch method of electronic calculator operation. Prerequisite: COMPASS score equivalent to completion of MAT 82 and ENG 82 or higher, or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Use the calculator to perform the functions of cross-footing, business application of positive and negative balances, estimating, payroll applications, and business money value problems
  • Use the calculator to compute pricing, sales tax, mixed operations, invoices, and machine memory function problems
  • Use a calculator to compute fractions and percentages for discounts, invoice extensions, and quantity pricing problems
  • Use a calculator to compute mark on, markup, markdown, and payroll problems
  • Use a calculator to compute investments, yields, and selling prices of stocks and bonds
  • Use a calculator to compute percentages, interest calculations, and metrics problems

QUICKBOOKS I

ACTG 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4901 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 2, 2015 July 28, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 12/20

Credits: 2

Covers principal applications, basic operating commands, and functions necessary to use QuickBooks automated accounting software. Basic applications include, but are not limited to, vendor, customer, and banking activities, and creating files. Prerequisite: ACTG 110 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the objects on the QuickBooks window; explain and utilize the function buttons, dialog boxes, toolbars, and help menu; create, edit, and delete files and accounts; and access specific files and accounts
  • Set up and enter transactions related to accounts receivable, accounts payable and banking
  • Create a company file from scratch and setting up the chart of accounts

QUICKBOOKS II

ACTG 143

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4911 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 30, 2015 Aug. 25, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 12/20

Credits: 3

Covers continued applications for vendor and customer activities using QuickBooks automated accounting software. Also covers starting up companies, inventory management, sales tax, payroll, and working with balance sheet accounts. Prerequisite: ACTG 115 and ACTG 141 or instructor approval. .

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the objects on the QuickBooks window; explain and utilize the function buttons, dialog boxes, toolbars, and help menu; create, edit, and delete files and accounts; and access specific files and accounts
  • Set up and enter transactions related to inventory, payroll, and accounts receivable and payable

PAYROLL & BUSINESS TAXES

ACTG 160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49B1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 5

Provides practice in all payroll operations, the recording of accounting entries involving payroll, and the preparation of required payroll and business tax returns. Covers the concepts, laws, and terminology required to perform specific payroll accounting functions. Prerequisite: ACTG 110 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Define terms, concepts, and legislation associated with payroll
  • Define and identify the major provision of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and calculate an employee’s earnings
  • Define the major provisions of the Social Security legislation, calculate the contributions, and prepare the required reports
  • Define the major provisions of the Federal Income Tax With-holding legislation, calculate the contributions, and prepare the required reports
  • Define the major provisions of the unemployment tax legislation, calculate the contributions, and prepare the required reports
  • Calculate payroll, journalize appropriate entries and post to general ledger accounts
  • Complete payroll records, record payroll transactions, and prepare selected payroll tax reports

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I LAB

ACTG 211

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49G1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 Arranged Online $25 3/20
4941 11 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Dorum, L. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $4.75 7/20

Credits: 2

Provides instructional activities that support material covered in ACCT& 201 in a supervised lab environment. Concurrent with ACCT& 201 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Record and maintain transactions records for a company. Complete the required accounting forms and statements according to industry standards
  • Complete the required forms and statements required to maintain and complete financial records for a business for a fiscal period

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING III LAB

ACTG 213

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49H1 Arranged Arranged Dorum, L. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 Arranged Online $25 9/20

Credits: 3

Provides instructional activities that support material covered in ACCT& 203 in a supervised lab environment. Concurrent with: ACCT& 203 Prerequisite: ACTG 211 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Record and maintain transactions records for a manufacturing company. Complete the required accounting forms and statements according to industry standards
  • Complete the required forms and statements required to maintain and complete financial records for a business for a fiscal period

FUNDAMENTALS OF INDIVIDUAL TAX ACCOUNTING

ACTG 222

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4951 11 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 MTTh Hybrid $29.75 16/20

Credits: 4

Introduces the fundamentals of individual income tax accounting theory and practice, including a study of the rules and regulations for preparation of the most common forms and schedules, a brief review of the history of income taxation, tax laws in the United States, and the differences between generally accepted accounting principles and income-tax accounting. Prerequisite: ACTG 115 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe how a bill becomes law and the effect legislation and judicial review has on income tax codes and administration
  • Define the tax formula
  • Define gross income including inclusions and exclusions
  • Explain and describe Capital property and Capital Gains
  • Define and explain adjustments for Adjusted Gross Income
  • Describe and define Itemized Deductions
  • Explain Tax Credits
  • Discuss and explain IRS audit and compliance issues

FUNDAMENTALS OF GOVERNMENTAL/NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING

ACTG 224

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
49J1 Arranged Arranged Cooke, S. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 5

Introduces the fundamentals of accounting theory and practice of governmental/nonprofit accounting, including a study of accounting methods; the reasons for and the use of the various funds; the purpose and use of budgets in this field of accounting; and the differences between generally accepted accounting principles, GASB standards, and fund/ governmental accounting. Prerequisite: ACTG 115 and ACCT& 201 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Define, describe and use the “funds” when accounting for a governmental entity
  • Differentiate between governmental and not-for-profit entities and describe and use their accounting methods
  • Describe and use fund accounting for colleges and universities
  • Describe and use fund accounting for hospitals and other health care providers

ACCOUNTING SPREADSHEETS II

ACTG 235

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4961 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 6/20

Credits: 4

Provides advanced instruction in electronic worksheets, various business spreadsheets, 3-D worksheets, and various functions, including the conditional function and accounting schedules. Prerequisite: ACTG 135 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Define and use various data base management tools within Excel to create, edit, and delete records within lists; sort and filter data; use various functions to manipulate data; and create basic pivot tables with minimum of 75% accuracy
  • Manipulate test, both imported and original information, within an Excel Workbook; use conditional and logical functions; prepare an amortization schedule with a minimum of 75% accuracy
  • Define and use workbooks, cell reference, worksheet reference, 3-D reference, linking workbooks using data from others with a minimum of 75% accuracy
  • Create one and two-variable data tables and use excel tools; goal seek, scenario Manager and solver, to provide information to help solve business problems with a minimum of 75% accuracy
  • Use Collaborative editing techniques to prepare a single workbook from multiple sources and authors, use Excel data in other Office programs and work with add-ins with a minimum of 75% accuracy
  • Define and use Excel Macros and use basic Visual Basic commands to modify Excel Macros, create and use templates with a minimum of 75% accuracy

BUSINESS OFFICE I

ACTG 260

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4971 12 p.m. 2 p.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 6, 2015 Aug. 20, 2015 MTWTh Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Provides an opportunity for students to experience and participate in a realistic office environment by providing financial statements, completing financial examinations, preparing payroll, and furnishing other similar financial accounting work products to the public. Prerequisites: ACTG 143, ACTG 235, CAS 120, and ACCT& 201, or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Research accounting careers and prepare appropriate employment related documents
  • Demonstrate proficiency in accounting, automated accounting, and computer processing by completing at least one set of monthly financial statements, or equivalent activity with a minimum 75% accuracy corrected to 100% after review
  • Demonstrate the ability to follow written instructions by completing client work appropriately following the proper SOP
  • Demonstrate the ability to recognize and correct accounting errors and omissions by reviewing work and commenting appropriately
  • Maintain appropriate files, records and office environment
  • Prioritize workload to include office as well as classroom assignments
  • Work with and maintain office machines
  • Complete office projects as assigned by the Faculty in a timely appropriate manner

BUSINESS OFFICE II

ACTG 262

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4981 12 p.m. 2 p.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 127 July 6, 2015 Aug. 20, 2015 MTWTh Web-Enhanced $29.75 2/20

Credits: 5

Provides an opportunity for students to experience and participate in a realistic office environment by providing financial statements, completing financial examinations, preparing payroll, and furnishing other similar financial accounting work products to the public. Prerequisite: ACTG 260

Course Outcomes

  • Research accounting careers and prepare appropriate employment related documents
  • Demonstrate proficiency in accounting, automated accounting, and computer processing by completing at least one set of monthly financial statements, or equivalent activity with a minimum 75% accuracy corrected to 100% after review
  • Demonstrate the ability to follow written instructions by completing client work appropriately following the proper SOP
  • Demonstrate the ability to recognize and correct accounting errors and omissions by reviewing work and commenting appropriately
  • Maintain appropriate files, records and office environment
  • Prioritize workload to include office as well as classroom assignments
  • Work with and maintain office machines
  • Complete office projects as assigned by the Faculty in a timely appropriate manner

INTERNSHIP I

ACTG 271

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4991 12 p.m. 2 p.m. Cooke, S. Bldg. 11, Rm. 144 July 6, 2015 Aug. 20, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $0 1/20

Credits: 5

Provides students with practical on-the-job field experience. Program offers students a way to combine classroom study with related work experience under the supervision of an employer. Work experience must be related to the student’s educational and career objectives. Must be approved by the instructor and includes a weekly seminar component. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Research accounting careers and prepare appropriate employment related documents
  • Experience the duties and requirements of an accounting office position
  • Students are responsible for obtaining a paid or non-paid accounting employment opportunity

BASIC ELECTRICITY

AMT 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4401 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Doyon, G. South Hill Campus Room 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 18/18

Credits: 4

Covers direct-current circuits, series, and parallel-circuit arrangements and their application. Includes the relationship between voltage, current, resistance, and power. Students will calculate and measure these values, understand the operation of the multimeter and its use in troubleshooting.

Course Outcomes

  • Calculate and measure electrical power
  • Measure voltage, current, resistance, and continuity
  • Determine the relationship of voltage, current, and resistance in electrical circuits
  • Inspect and service batteries

ADVANCED ELECTRICITY

AMT 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4411 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Doyon, G. South Hill Campus Room 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 18/18

Credits: 4

Understand the effect of resistance, capacitance, and inductance in AC circuits, and understand transformers. Learn about basic semi-conductor devices (diodes and transistors), and be able to explain their function in simple circuits.

Course Outcomes

  • Calculate and measure capacitance and inductance
  • Read and interpret aircraft electrical circuit diagrams, including solid state devices and logic functions
  • Determine the relationship of voltage, current, and resistance in AC electrical circuits

AIRCRAFT FUEL SYSTEMS, ICE & RAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, & FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

AMT 133

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4471 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 117 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 13/18

Credits: 4

Covers principles of operation and configuration of warning systems, electrical brake controls, anti-skid systems, and landing gear position indicating and warning systems. Learn the effects of ice and rain on aircraft during operations in inclement weather, the equipment and materials used to counter ice and rain, and the maintenance of this equipment. Explore components and operation of fire detection and extinguishing equipment, as well as smoke and toxic gas detection systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Check and service fuel dump systems
  • Perform fuel management transfer, and refueling
  • Inspect, check, and repair pressure fueling systems
  • Repair aircraft fuel system components
  • Inspect and repair fluid quantity indicating systems
  • Troubleshoot, service, and repair fluid pressure and temperature warning systems
  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair aircraft fuel systems
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair airframe ice and rain control systems
  • Inspect, check, and service smoke and carbon monoxide detection systems
  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair aircraft fire detection and extinguishing systems

AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR

AMT 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4441 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 117 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 13/18

Credits: 3

Inspect, check, service and repair landing gear retraction systems, shock struts, brakes, wheels, tires and steering systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Inspect, check, service, and repair landing gear, retraction systems, shock struts, brakes, wheels, tires, and steering systems

HYDRAULIC & PNEUMATIC POWER SYSTEMS

AMT 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4451 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 117 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 13/18

Credits: 3

Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot and repair hydraulic and pneumatic power systems and components. Identify and select hydraulic fluids.

Course Outcomes

  • Repair hydraulic and pneumatic power systems components
  • Identify and select hydraulic fluids
  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair hydraulic and pneumatic power systems
  • AMT 142
  • Inspect, check, service, and repair shop equipment
  • Calibrate precision tools
  • Assist Repair Station Operations

AIRFRAME ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

AMT 143

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4421 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Doyon, G. South Hill Campus Room 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 18/18

Credits: 5

Learn about operation of AC and DC electrical systems used on large and small aircraft, generating and starting systems, AC and DC electric motors, wiring, controls, switches, indicators, and protective devices, and constant speed and integrated drive generators.

Course Outcomes

  • Repair and inspect aircraft electrical system components; crimp and splice wiring to manufacturer’s specifications; and repair pins and sockets of aircraft connectors
  • Install, check, and service airframe electrical wiring, controls, switches, indicators, and protective devices
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair alternating and direct current electrical systems

ENGINE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

AMT 144

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4431 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Doyon, G. South Hill Campus Room 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 18/18

Credits: 5

Develop an understanding of the operation of generators, alternators, DC motors, and AC motors, and their repair and overhaul. Learn the special requirements of electrical components operating in high-temperature areas and how to install wiring, controls, switches, and indicators, and to protect them from the effects of high temperatures.

Course Outcomes

  • Repair engine and electrical system components
  • Install, check, and service engine electrical wiring, controls, switches, indicators, and protective devices

CABIN ATMOSPHERE CONTROL SYSTEMS

AMT 145

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4461 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 117 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 13/18

Credits: 3

Physiological aspects of flight. Inspection and maintenance of oxygen, pressurization, heating, cooling and air-conditioning systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair heating, cooling, air conditioning, pressurization systems, and air cycle machines
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair heating, cooling, air-conditioning, and pressurization systems
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair oxygen systems

AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT, COMMUNICATION & NAVIGATION SYSTEMS

AMT 146

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4481 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Mensonides, J. South Hill Campus Room 117 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 13/18

Credits: 3

Learn principles of operation of common aircraft instruments, air or vacuum driven gyros, pilot-static systems, and static system leak tests. Gain operating principles of common avionics equipment, antennas, autopilots, servos, approach coupling systems, interphones, static discharge devices and ground proximity warning systems. Inspect and repair antennas and electronic equipment.

Course Outcomes

  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair electronic flight instrument systems and both mechanical and electrical heading, speed, altitude, temperature, pressure, and position indicating systems to include the use of built-in test equipment
  • Install instruments and perform a static pressure system leak test
  • Inspect, check, and troubleshoot autopilot, servos and approach coupling systems
  • Inspect, check, and service aircraft electronic communication and navigation systems, including VHF passenger address interphones and static discharge devices, aircraft VOR, ILS,
  • LORAN, Radar beacon transponders, flight management computers, and GPWS
  • Inspect and repair antenna and electronic equipment installations

FAA TESTING & TURBINE ENGINES

AMT 217

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4491 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Creech, D. South Hill Campus Room 118 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 15/18

Credits: 7

Covers preparation for and completion of FAA certification examinations. FAA written examinations are accomplished outside of CPTC at an FAA Designated Written Examination Center. After successful completion of written examinations, students must pass an oral and practical examination administered by an FAA Designated Maintenance Examiner. Students are charged a fee for these examinations. Note: Fees for these examinations are not included in the college tuition or lab fees. The remaining 120 hours of training concentrate on turbine engines, including their history, different types, the theory of operation of turbine engines, the Brayton cycle, Bernoulli’s theory, and turbine engine air-flow characteristics. Learn the theory of operation of different types of compressors, combustion chambers, turbines and turbine stator vanes (nozzles). Learn the exhaust sections maintenance of turbine engines, including turbine engine removal, overhaul, inspection, and repair procedures. Learn to install turbine engines, make adjustments, troubleshoot, test and check run procedures, and become familiar with regulations, publications, and records for turbine engines.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. Student must read the detailed requirements for each Performance Objective contained in the FAA approved Project Guide. The Project Guide is located in each instructional area for student use. Specific grading criteria for each Performance Objective is listed in the Project Guide. In all cases the FAA APPROVED CURRICULUM has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • PASS GENERAL FINAL EXAMINATION WITH AN GRADE OF NINETY PERCENT OR HIGHER
  • PASS AIRFRAME FINAL EXAMINATION WITH AN AVERAGE GRADE OF NINETY PERCENT OR HIGHER
  • Understand the theory of operation of turbine engines to include; the history, and the different types of turbine engines. Newton's Laws, the Brayton Cycle, and the formula F=MA. Understand the air flow characteristics, and the relationship between RPM and total thrust of a turbine engine. Explain the relationship between turbine inlet temperature and thrust
  • Understand the relative pressures in various positions in a turbine engine. Discuss the different types of compressors, and theory of operation of centrifugal and axial flow compressors. Explain the operating characteristics of single and split-spool compressors, combustion sections, turbine blades, and turbine section stator vanes (nozzles) used in turbine engines
  • Describe the different types of exhaust sections used in turbine engines, and the function of an exhaust cone in a turbine engine. Comply with overhaul procedures for turbine engines to include; Disassembly, inspection, repair, replacement of life limited parts, assembly, and check run to verify proper operation
  • Understand test and check run procedures when using a test cell to include; safety and operational limitations when starting and testing turbine engines. Understand how to start a turbine engine and observe emergency shutdown procedure in case of excessive start temperatures. Explain how to run and test a turbine engine for proper operation and power output. Explain the purpose of observing proper engine cool down and shutdown procedures. Explain how to perform an acceleration and deceleration check
  • Demonstrate how to start a turbine engine and observe emergency shutdown procedure in case of excessive start temperatures. Demonstrate how to perform an acceleration and deceleration check. Demonstrate how to run and test turbine engine for proper operation and power output
  • Demonstrate repair procedures of components and parts on a turbine engine to include; combustion case liner, compressor assembly, turbine assembly, gear box, bleed valve, anti-ice valve, pressurization and dump valve, fuel pump, fuel control, fuel nozzle, igniter plug and turbine governor assembly
  • Perform the inspection of components on a turbine engine installation to include; combustion case liner, compressor assembly, turbine assembly, gear box, bleed valve, anti-ice valve, pressurization and dump valve, fuel pump, fuel control, fuel nozzle, igniter plug and turbine governor assembly. Explain how to inspect for leaks, chaffing of lines, engine mount security, and other connections to the airframe
  • Perform on-aircraft turbine engine servicing to include; how to select and service a turbine engine with the correct lubricants, and fuel. Explain the importance of putting the oil and fuel caps on correctly
  • Perform the repair procedures of components and parts on a turbine engine when installed on an aircraft to include; combustion case liner, compressor assembly, turbine assembly, gear box, bleed valve, anti-ice valve, pressurization and dump valve, fuel pump, fuel control, fuel nozzle, igniter plug and turbine governor assembly
  • Describe the installation procedures of a turbine engine to include; Safety precautions, proper alignment, security of engine mount attachment fittings and hardware. Explain the importance of following the airframe manufactures instructions on engine installation for that aircraft
  • Use common turbine engine troubleshooting procedures to include; high exhaust temperature and low power output, high exhaust temperature during start, high oil temperature, low oil pressure, high oil consumption, compressor stall, hung start, lean die-out, failure to light-off during start, long compressor coast down time, and short compressor coast down time
  • Demonstrate the removal procedures of a turbine engine to include; Safety precautions, removal of engine mount fittings and hardware. Explain the importance of following the airframe manufactures instructions on engine removal for that aircraft. Discuss how to mount the removed engine in a work stand, or shipping container

ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEMS

AMT 219

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44A1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Creech, D. South Hill Campus Room 118 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 15/18

Credits: 4

Covers the components and the operation of engine lubrication systems. Introduction to the requirements and characteristics of engine lubricants and lubrication systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. Student must read the detailed requirements for each Performance Objective contained in the FAA approved Project Guide. The Project Guide is located in each instructional area for student use. Specific grading criteria for each Performance Objective is listed in the Project Guide. In all cases the FAA APPROVED CURRICULUM has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Identify and select aviation lubricants
  • Repair aircraft engine lubrication system components
  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair aircraft engine lubrication systems

ENGINE INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS

AMT 221

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44B1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Creech, D. South Hill Campus Room 118 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 15/18

Credits: 4

Covers the theory and principles of operation of electrical and mechanical fluid rate of flow indicating systems. Covers electrical and mechanical temperature, pressure and RPM-indicating systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. Student must read the detailed requirements for each Performance Objective contained in the FAA approved Project Guide. The Project Guide is located in each instructional area for student use. Specific grading criteria for each Performance Objective is listed in the Project Guide. In all cases the FAA APPROVED CURRICULUM has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Troubleshoot, service, and repair electrical and mechanical fluid rate-of-flow indicating systems
  • Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair electrical and mechanical engine temperature, pressure, and r.p.m. indicating systems

PROPELLERS & FAA FINAL TESTING

AMT 229

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44G1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Vick, P. South Hill Campus Room 120 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 20/18

Credits: 4

Consist of the theory of operation and nomenclature. Propeller controls and instrumentation. Fixed pitch, controllable pitch, constant speed, and feathering propellers. Governors, anti-ice, phasing, and synchronization systems. Inspection, maintenance, and repairs to propellers and related systems, including familiarization of unducted fan engines. At the end of the course six hours are devoted to preparation for FAA certification examinations. FAA written examinations are accomplished at an FAA Designated Written Examination Center. After successful completion of written examinations, students must pass an Oral and Practical Examination administered by an FAA Designated Mechanics Examiner. Students are charged a fee for these examinations administered by FAA designated examiners and centers. Note: Fees for theses examinations are not included in the college tuition or lab fees systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. In all cases the FAA Approved curriculum has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Inspect, check, propellers and synchronizing and ice control systems
  • Identify and select propeller lubricants
  • Balance propellers
  • Repair propeller control system components
  • Inspect, check, service, and repair fixed-pitch, constant speed, and feathering propellers, and propeller governing systems
  • Install troubleshoot and remove propellers.
  • Repair aluminum alloy propeller blades
  • Pass FAA Powerplant test

ENGINE INSPECTION

AMT 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44C1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Vick, P. South Hill Campus Room 120 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 20/18

Credits: 4

Engine inspection consists of detailed work with Federal Aviation Regulations, types of inspections, conformance to type certificate data sheets and major alterations, airworthiness directives, and maintenance record entries.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. In all cases the FAA Approved curriculum has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Objective 1Perform powerplant conformity and airworthiness inspections

ENGINE IGNITION & STARTING SYSTEMS

AMT 233

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44D1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Vick, P. South Hill Campus Room 120 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 20/18

Credits: 4

Covers the operation, maintenance, and overhaul of magnetos and ignition, harnesses; the inspection, servicing, troubleshooting, and repair of reciprocating and turbine engine ignition system; and components and turbine engine electrical and pneumatic starting systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. In all cases the FAA Approved curriculum has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Overhaul magneto and ignition harness
  • Inspect, service, troubleshoot, and repair reciprocating and turbine engine ignition systems and components
  • Inspect, service, troubleshoot, and repair turbine engine electrical and starting systems
  • Inspect, service, and troubleshoot turbine engine pneumatic starting systems

INDUCTION, AIRFLOW, COOLING, & EXHAUST SYSTEMS

AMT 235

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
44F1 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Vick, P. South Hill Campus Room 120 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 20/18

Credits: 3

Learn about the maintenance of carburetors and fuel-injected, naturally aspirated, turbo-charged and super-charged induction systems. Learn about maintenance of ice and rain control systems as well as principles of air-cooled engines and problems that can occur with an air-cooled engine. Study the history, development and function of exhaust systems. Students will describe, inspect, maintain, troubleshoot and repair components of exhaust systems. Learn operation principles of turbine engine reversing systems and power recovery turbines.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and lab activities the student will be able to complete each student performance objective to the level of proficiency required by FAR Part 147. In all cases the FAA Approved curriculum has precedence. This document is not FAA approved and is intended as a guide only
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair engine ice and rain control systems
  • Inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair heat exchangers, superchargers, and turbine engine airflow and temperature control systems
  • Inspect, check, service, and repair carburetor air intake and induction manifolds

CIVIL ENGINEERING SITE DESIGN

ARC 123

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6301 8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 15/20

Credits: 5

Overview of site design and planning, lot, subdivision and road layouts, contouring, slopes and profiles, and zoning regulations. Prerequisites: ARC 121.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and execute proper line uniformity, contrast and darkness for civil drawings

ARCHITECTURAL REPORTING I

ARC 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
631C 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 2/20
6311 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 17/20

Credits: 3

Includes investigation, research, and report preparation on materials, methods, and trends in construction. Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills, and computer keyboarding skills of 30 wpm.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify, utilize, and cite credible research resources in the field of architecture
  • Research and evaluate future trends in housing construction, and new and alternate materials
  • Prepare written reports using research from credible resources
  • Provide a presentation to the class from information used for an approved report
  • Identify, utilize, and cite credible research resources in the field of architecture

CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL RESEARCH I

ARC 152

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
631T 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 July 29, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 3/20
6321 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 July 29, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 17/20

Credits: 2

Requires research of manufacturers and suppliers information, and assembly of Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) materials Divisions 1 through 14. Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills. Instructor permission required. .

Note:

Only section 633T is an I-BEST class.

Course Outcomes

  • Assemble and organize a minimum of 15 items of manufacturers’ product literature for CSI Divisions 00-14, to conform to the 49-division Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) format

DRAFTING TECHNOLOGIES II

ARC 173

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
631R 8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $35 3/20
6331 8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $35 16/20

Credits: 5

Basic drafting skills for civil engineering and profiles for subdivisions. Includes basic design drawings necessary for residential design, and also includes printing completed drawings on industry-standard hardware. Prerequisites: ARC 171. Instructor permission required. .

Note:

Only section 633R is an I-BEST class.

Course Outcomes

  • Accurately draw property lines when provided industry standard bearing and distance
  • Extrapolate 1-foot contours from provided 5-foot contour information
  • Produce accurate profile drawings from plat information
  • Obtain parcel information from local municipality in person or via city or county website

ENGINEERING MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

ARC 191

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6341 1 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $35 5/20

Credits: 5

Analysis of loading conditions and selection of wood-member sizes and materials for house design. Material stress and strain are computed. Prerequisites: ARC 125, MAT 99 or higher.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and use industry standard symbols and terminology
  • Investigate forces and resultants, calculate and diagram force equilibrium
  • Solve problems of force and unit material stresses, bending, deformation and shear
  • Define structural steel and reinforced concrete products and terminology

DETAILING AND LIGHT COMMERCIAL

ARC 221

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6351 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T Web-Enhanced $35 9/20

Credits: 5

Overview of specialized floor plan types, framing, sections, detailing, and specifications for light-framing and commercial buildings. Prerequisites: ARC 125 .

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and detail the structural components of a residential building
  • Determine appropriate locations and produce professional quality building sections
  • Create a set of plans and details for a commercial tilt building

DESIGN PROJECT II

ARC 225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6361 2 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th Web-Enhanced $35 0/20

Credits: 5

Project management and design of an intermediate architectural drafting project. Project conforms to regulatory codes, hypothetical client needs, and established schedules. Producing a complete set of computer-drafted and engineered construction drawings. Give effective oral reports of progress. Prerequisites: ARC 223, ARC 281

Course Outcomes

  • Meet client criteria while conforming to regulatory codes
  • Identify and meet schedule benchmarks
  • Draw and assemble a complete set of drawings for a 2-story home

SPECIAL INTERN PROJECT

ARC 227

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6371 Arranged Arranged Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $10 0/20

Credits: 5

Complete the written Work-Based Learning Experience Plan. Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.

SPECIAL DESIGN PROJECT

ARC 229

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6381 2 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $14.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Complete special design project as approved by the instructor to aid in realistic training. Prerequisites: ARC 225, ARC 281.

Course Outcomes

  • Conform to all steps, criteria and the timeline contained in the oral or written agreement
  • Manage the Project Design Schedule, client meetings and keep typed meeting minute notes of every client meeting
  • Maintain Project Management file with all meeting minutes, and all client-approved diagrams, sketches and plans
  • Use AutoCAD, Sketchup and/or Revit, as directed, to prepare professional drawings and concepts for client approval

COST ESTIMATING I

ARC 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6391 2 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T Web-Enhanced $35 5/20

Credits: 3

Completion of a computerized, detailed cost estimate for a one-story house with site development. .

Course Outcomes

  • Use a set of plans for a residential project to calculate the approximate cost of building

ENERGY ANALYSIS

ARC 237

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
63A1 2 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W Web-Enhanced $35 2/20

Credits: 1

Completion of two computerized energy analyses for a one-story house. .

Course Outcomes

  • Utilize the Washington State Energy Code to determine compliance for a residential home

INTERMEDIATE AUTOCAD

ARC 281

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
631M 1 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $35 3/20
63B1 1 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Muir, C. Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $35 10/20

Credits: 5

Use Windows-based AutoCAD applications to produce intermediate design and production drawings and details and save and print drawings on industry-standard hardware. Prerequisites: ARC 181.

Note:

Only section 631M is an I-BEST class.

Course Outcomes

  • Create drawings and details in AutoCAD that are suitable for architectural construction drawings
  • Utilize provided information to create, complete and/or modify AutoCAD drawings

APPLIED AUTOCAD

ARC 284

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
63C1 10 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 203 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th Web-Enhanced $35 0/20

Credits: 5

Use Windows-based AutoCAD applications to create a complete set of design and production drawings and details for a design project, and save and print the drawings on industry-standard hardware. Prerequisites: ARC 281.

Course Outcomes

  • Complete commercial details from provided sketches
  • Master the use of layout space and title borders
  • Use drafting software to draft civil site plans

FUNDAMENTALS OF SHOP EQUIPMENT

ARCF 103

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1701 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 2/18

Credits: 3

Covers shop safety, fundamentals of tool use, and proper use of shop equipment. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate the basic shop safety practices, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate the proper use of basic hand tools and shop equipment, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

WELDING & METAL SKILLS

ARCF 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1711 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 2/18

Credits: 4

Covers welding, heating, and cutting techniques, using MIG and oxyacetylene equipment. Students will learn safe handling and correct metal-forming techniques of sheet metal. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities the students will describe and/or demonstrate proper safety, set-up and use of an Oxy-Acetylene torch for welding, cutting and heating with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities the students will describe and/or demonstrate proper, safe set-up and use of MIG welder with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lecture and lab activities students will describe and/or demonstrate proper safety, set-up and use of basic sheet metal forming equipment including a brake and a shear with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

BASIC REPAIRS AND ASSEMBLY

ARCF 114

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1721 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 2/18

Credits: 8

Covers basic repair and assembly procedures for bolt-on body components. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate and/or describe proper metal straightening technique and use of body fillers, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate and/or describe proper procedures for removal, replacement, and adjustment of bolt on body parts, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will describe and/or demonstrate proper mixing, application and forming of fiber glass as a means of repair and/or customization, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

CUSTOM FABRICATION

ARCF 119

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1731 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/18

Credits: 6

Explores basic customizing techniques used on original factory parts, as well as fabrication of custom parts. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate and/or describe basic procedures and technique for customizing factory original body parts, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will demonstrate and/or describe basic procedures and technique for custom fabrication of body parts using fiber glass and/or sheet metal, with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

REFINISHING EQUIPMENT

ARCF 124

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1741 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 0/18

Credits: 4

Explores refinishing equipment use and maintenance. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will identify the spray painting equipment used in auto restoration and custom painting with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will know how a spray gun and airbrush work with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will identify the basic techniques of good spray painting and recognize variables that influence the quality of the spray finish with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will clean and properly care for a spray gun and airbrush with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will identify situations for which HVLP and airbrushes are recommended with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will explain the operation of spray booths and will demonstrate the operation of paint respirators with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

REFINISH PREPARATION

ARCF 129

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1751 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/18

Credits: 7

Explores corrosion protection and vehicle refinish preparation. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will determine whether or not the existing finish is defect free and adheres soundly to the automobile; recognize the surface defects that require additional surface preparation. The student will also describe the three methods of removing a deteriorated paint film with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will prepare existing substrates and bare metal for refinishing with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will determine when to apply a primer, a primer-sealer, a primer-surfacer or glazing putty with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will prepare plastic parts for refinishing with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will mask a vehicle for various paint applications with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given lectures and lab activities, the student will describe the anti-corrosive materials used to prevent and retard rust formation with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given lectures and lab activities, the student will select the correct anti-corrosive application equipment for specific applications with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

ADVANCED PAINT APPLICATION

ARCF 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1761 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/20

Credits: 6

Covers application of advanced masking, topcoat shading, and graphics on a restoration or custom project. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will improve project planning and application of skills gained in previous courses to 90% accuracy
  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage time/materials resources to 80% accuracy

FIBERGLASS/COMPOSITES TECHNIQUES

ARCF 133

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1771 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 0/20

Credits: 6

Further develop skills in customizing techniques used on original factory parts, as well as fabrication of custom parts. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lectures and lab activities students will describe and/or demonstrate basic procedures and technique for customizing factory original body parts, with a minimum of 70% accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities students will describe and/or demonstrate basic procedures and technique for custom fabrication of body parts using fiber glass and/or sheet metal, with a minimum of 70% accuracy

CUSTOM REFINISHING

ARCF 134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1781 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 2/18

Credits: 6

Covers topcoat, clear coat and custom refinishing. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will explain the difference between spot panel and complete refinishing with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will describe how to spray different types of materials with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will properly locate color information from a vehicles original color with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will describe the paint finish systems applicable to plastic repair with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will apply custom painting techniques with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities the student will apply decals, pin striping, wood-grain transfers, moldings and trim emblems with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will match color and texture with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will identify the steps in applying various types of color coats with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will apply base coat and clear coat systems with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

SURFACE IMPERFECTIONS/SHOW AND SHINE

ARCF 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1791 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 0/18

Credits: 4

Covers paint-application problem solving and show detailing. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will explain the final detailing, show & shine steps with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy
  • Given the lectures and lab activities, the student will recognize and correct defects occurring in a paint finish with a minimum of 70 percent accuracy

AUTOMOTIVE RESTORATION & CUSTOM LAB

ARCF 154

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
17A1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 0/18

Credits: 9

Finish projects and competencies in restoration and/or customizing. Nine credits in summer quarter; variable credit other three quarters. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lab opportunities the quality of the students hands on skills will show improvement to 90 percent accuracy
  • Given the lab opportunities students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently with less supervision

METAL STRENGTHENING AND SHAPING

ARCF 159

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
17B1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/21

Credits: 6

Metal straightening and shaping techniques on a custom or restoration project. . Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will improve project planning and application of skills gained in previous courses to 90% accuracy
  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage time/materials resources to 80% accuracy

CUSTOM PAINT APPLICATION

ARCF 167

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
17C1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Richards, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 306 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 0/18

Credits: 3

Covers application of custom masking, topcoat shading, and graphics. . Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will improve project planning and application of skills gained in previous courses to 90% accuracy
  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage time/ materials resources to 80% accuracy

APPLIED METAL SKILLS

ARCF 168

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
17D1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Freeman, K. Bldg. 03, Rm. 307 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/18

Credits: 3

Covers application of previously acquired metal skills as they relate to the student’s project work. Instructor permission required. .

Course Outcomes

  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will improve project planning and application of skills gained in previous courses to 90% accuracy
  • Given the lecture and guided project work students will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently and manage time/ materials resources to 80% accuracy

ART APPRECIATION

ART& 100

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0501 Arranged Arranged WAOL Online June 25, 2015 Aug. 19, 2015 Arranged Online $25 8/25

Credits: 5

Introduction to the diversity of the art world from ancient civilizations to contemporary society. A discussion of art terminology and methods will be covered in an overview of art materials and techniques. \

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the role of artists and their cultures in different time periods
  • Identify universal themes artists express
  • Identify and describe the formal elements and principles of art
  • Describe the various visual media and processes of making two or three dimensional art projects
  • Describe an art piece’s formal visual elements
  • Analyze different forms of art objectively and subjectively
  • Identify and describe the concepts behind the works of art
  • Produce a collage and contour line drawing

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

ASL& 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0502 2:30 p.m. 4:50 p.m. Wilson, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 200A July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 MW In-Person $0 11/20

Credits: 5

Informs students about deafness, deaf culture, the deaf community, and American Sign Language. Learn to communicate both expressively and receptively in American Sign Language in basic conversation situations. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP placement score or successful completion of ENG 94.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate the understanding of beginning expressive and receptive skills utilizing ASL vocabulary
  • Demonstrate the understanding of beginning expressive and receptive skills integrating both ASL basic grammar components and sentence structures
  • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively in groups and one-on-one settings, utilizing various skills acquired to accomplish specific tasks
  • Demonstrate knowledge of spatial relationships and ASL gloss
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the different types of hearing loss, and gain insight into how sounds affect the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  • Demonstrate increased awareness concerning how to interact with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing with and without an interpreter
  • Explain the historical development of ASL and Deaf Culture, dating back to as early as 355 B.C
  • Demonstrate an understanding of various technologies that are used to communicate with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

ENGINE MINOR MECHANICAL REPAIR

AUT 174

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4601 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Offerdahl, R. Bldg. 03, Rm. 701 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 20/18

Credits: 6

Diagnose and repair general engine mechanical, lubrication, and cooling-system problems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics and minor engine mechanical service and repair procedures. Prerequisites: Must have required tools and textbooks.

ENGINE MAJOR MECHANICAL REPAIR

AUT 175

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4611 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Offerdahl, R. Bldg. 03, Rm. 701 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 20/18

Credits: 7

Diagnose and repair engine blocks, heads, and valve trains. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, and removal and installation procedures to successfully diagnose and repair automobiles and light truck engines. Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed AUT 174 and have required tools and textbooks.

ENGINE MECHANICAL LAB

AUT 178

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4621 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Offerdahl, R. Bldg. 03, Rm. 701 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 20/18

Credits: 3

Repair engine components by applying knowledge attained in required courses. This is a hands-on class, utilizing live projects. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with diagnosis, maintenance and repair of automobiles and light truck engines. Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed AUT 174 and 175 and have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMOTIVE IGNITION SYSTEMS

AUT 217

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4631 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Covington, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 901 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 8/18

Credits: 7

Diagnose and repair electronic and computer-controlled automotive ignition systems. Upon completion of this course, students will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, and diagnostic and repair procedures used on automobiles and light trucks. Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, and 209 and must have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL SYSTEMS

AUT 223

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4641 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Covington, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 901 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 8/18

Credits: 7

Diagnose and repair fuel management systems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, and diagnostic and repair procedures used on automobiles and light trucks. Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, 209, and 217, and must have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMOTIVE EMISSIONS SYSTEMS

AUT 236

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4651 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Covington, G. Bldg. 03, Rm. 901 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 8/18

Credits: 7

Diagnose and repair emissions control systems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, and diagnostic and repair procedures used on automobiles and light trucks. Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, 209, 217, and 223, and must have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSIONS

AUT 247

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4661 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Brown, D. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 18/20

Credits: 7

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills to competently repair automatic transmissions. Upon completion of the course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance, and repair of automobile/ light truck automatic transmissions. Prerequisites: Must have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMATIC TRANSAXLES

AUT 250

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4671 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Brown, D. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 18/18

Credits: 7

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills to competently repair automatic transaxles. Upon completion of the course, the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance and repair of automobile transaxles. Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT 247 and have required tools and textbooks.

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS/TRANSAXLES LAB

AUT 251

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4681 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Brown, D. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 18/18

Credits: 4

This course is designed to teach the student to competently repair automatic transmission/transaxle assemblies by applying knowledge attained in required courses. This is a hands-on class, utilizing live projects. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with diagnosis, maintenance, and repair of automobile/light truck drive trains by applying academic knowledge to hands-on projects. Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses AUT 247 and 250, and must have required tools and textbooks prior to entering this course.

HYBRID ALTERNATE FUEL INTRODUCTION & SAFETY

AUTH 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4691 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers the history, evolution and general safety precautions for servicing. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

ALTERNATE FUEL VEHICLE SYSTEMS

AUTH 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46A1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers diesel, E85, CNG, and hydrogen systems in use today. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

TOYOTA HYBRID SYSTEM OVERVIEW

AUTH 115

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46B1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/15

Credits: 2

Covers the Toyota systems in use today with a focus on the Prius model. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID SYSTEMS

AUTH 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46C1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers the Toyota systems in use today with a focus on the Prius model. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

HONDA HYBRID SYSTEMS OVERVIEW

AUTH 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46D1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers the Honda hybrid systems in use today with a focus on the Civic model. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

HONDA CIVIC IMA HYBRID SYSTEM

AUTH 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46F1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers the Honda Civic Integrated Motor Assist systems in use today. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience. Fee: $30.00

FORD ESCAPE/MERCURY MARINER HYBRID SYSTEM

AUTH 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46G1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers the Ford Escape/Mercury Mariner Hybrid systems in use today with a focus on the Escape model. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

GENERAL MOTORS AND OTHER HYBRID SYSTEMS OVERVIEW

AUTH 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46H1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Covers General Motors and other systems in use today with a focus on the GM Dual Mode model system. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

ADVANCED LAB & FINAL EXAM PREPARATION

AUTH 145

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
46J1 7:30 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Bridges, W. Bldg. 03, Rm. 601 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 4/14

Credits: 2

Gives students a hands-on opportunity for preparation for the final exam. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a NATEF/ASA-certified automotive training program or have instructor’s permission with two years automotive experience.

PRIVATE PILOT I

AVP 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5101 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Training in basic aircraft control, aircraft systems, airport procedures, and traffic pattern operations. Prerequisite: FAA Class II Medical with Student Pilot Certificate prior to the first day of class. Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform unassisted takeoffs
  • Demonstrate correct communications and traffic pattern procedures
  • Perform landings with instructor assistance
  • Demonstrate basic understanding of steep turns, slow flight stalls, stall recovery, and emergency operations
  • Complete demonstrated stalls
  • Become familiar with pilot training, aviation opportunities, and human factors in aviation
  • Gain basic understanding of the college's pilot training program
  • Gain a basic understanding of the main airplane components and systems at an 80% proficiency level
  • Become familiar with flight instrument functions and operating characteristics, including errors and common malfunctions at an 80% proficiency level
  • Learn about the power plant and related systems at an 80% proficiency level

PRIVATE PILOT II

AVP 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5111 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Covers aircraft control, establishing and maintaining specific flight attitudes, and ground reference maneuvers. Prerequisite: AVP 105 or equivalent. Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Display increased proficiency and skill in instrument scan and interpretation during practice of instrument flight maneuvers
  • Perform takeoffs, landings, and go-around without instructor assistance
  • Accomplish emergency procedures with minimal instructor assistance
  • Increase proficiency and precision in ground reference maneuvers
  • Become familiar with the four forces of flight, aerodynamics principals of stability, maneuvering flight and load factor at an 80% proficiency level
  • Understand stall / spin characteristics as they relate to training airplanes at an 80% proficiency level
  • Understand importance of prompt recognition of stall indications at an 80% proficiency level
  • Understand important safety considerations, including collision avoidance precautions, right-of-way rules, and minimum safe altitudes. 80% proficiency
  • Discuss airport markings and lighting, aeronautical charts, and types of airspace. 80% proficiency level required

PRIVATE PILOT III

AVP 115

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5121 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Basic performance maneuvers, traffic pattern procedures, and takeoffs and landings. Upon successful completion, the student shall solo the aircraft. Prerequisite: AVP 110 or equivalent. Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Successfully pass the Presolo Written Exam with a minimum score of 80% and review incorrect responses with instructor
  • Demonstrate the ability and readiness for supervised solo flight in the traffic pattern
  • Exhibit understanding of attitude instrument flying
  • Demonstrate good understanding of local airport and airspace rules as well as systems and equipment malfunctions and related emergency procedures
  • Display the ability to solo the training airplane safely in the traffic pattern. At no time will the safety of the flight be in question
  • Complete solo flight in the local traffic pattern as directed by the instructor
  • Competently perform preflight duties and all other procedures and maneuvers for the safe conduct of a solo flight with the Chief Flight Instructor
  • Undergo additional instruction, if necessary to ensure that the student meets the standards for advancing to stage 2
  • Understand collision avoidance procedures and runway incursion avoidance at an 80% proficiency level
  • Become familiar with radar, transponder and services for VFR aircraft at an 80% proficiency level
  • Identify and explain services provided by FSS at an 80% proficiency level
  • Understand radio communication equipment and phraseology
  • Gain a basic understanding of the sources of flight information, particularly the AIM and AC

PRIVATE PILOT PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS I

AVP 118

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5131 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate required aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

PRIVATE PILOT IV

AVP 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5141 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Introduces knowledge, skill, and aeronautical experience necessary to successfully complete the navigation and cross country flight portion of flight training. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AVP 115 or equivalent.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain runway conditions that necessitate the use of short and soft field takeoffs and landings
  • Demonstrate the correct procedure for short and soft field takeoffs and landings
  • Perform ground reference maneuvers while maintaining altitude within 150 feet
  • Perform short, soft and normal takeoffs while airspeed varies no more than 5 knots
  • Perform Short, soft and normal landings within 300 feet of desired touchdown point
  • Perform takeoffs and landings, stall series, slow flight and ground reference maneuvers
  • Perform takeoffs and landings while maintaining good directional control and flying stabilized approach
  • Demonstrate basic understanding of VOR/ADF orientation, tracking and homing
  • Display the correct unusual attitude recovery techniques and be able to imitate emergency climbs and descents using communications and NAV facilities
  • Demonstrate the skill to perform cross-country flight safely as the sole occupant of the airplane while using NAV systems and RADAR services
  • Navigate to and land at an airport more than 50 n.m. from the original departure point
  • Demonstrate complete preflight planning, weather analysis, use of FAA publications, adherence to the preflight plan using dead reckoning and pilotage

PRIVATE PILOT V

AVP 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5151 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Provides the knowledge, skill, and aeronautical experience necessary to read and understand disseminated weather reports and forecasts. Meets the requirements for cross country navigation and basic instrument flight. Prerequisite: AVP 125 or equivalent.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate complete preflight planning, weather analysis, use of FAA publications, adherence to the preflight plan using dead reckoning and pilotage
  • Demonstrate competency in basic attitude instrument flying at night
  • Control altitude within 150 feet in basic maneuvers during night flight
  • Demonstrate skill in performing short and soft field takeoffs and landings at night
  • Display the correct recovery techniques from stalls and unusual attitudes during night flights
  • Demonstrate skill in performing short and soft field takeoffs and landings at night
  • Display the correct recovery techniques from stalls and unusual attitudes during night flights
  • Initiate emergency climbs and descents by instrument reference during night flight
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of altitude control
  • Control altitude within 150 feet during basic flight maneuvers and recover from stalls with a minimum loss of latitude
  • Complete 5 takeoffs and landings to a full stop
  • Perform stabilized landing approaches with touchdown at a predetermined area on the runway

PRIVATE PILOT VI

AVP 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5161 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Gain the proficiency to meet the requirements necessary for FAA Private Pilot Certification with an Airplane Category and Single-Engine Class Rating. Prerequisite: AVP 130 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform listed maneuvers as assigned by the instructor to the proficiency criteria established by the Private Pilot Practical Test Standards
  • Practice flight maneuvers and procedures assigned by the instructor with emphasis on correcting deficient areas in preparation for the final stage check
  • The Chief Flight Instructor will evaluate the student’s ability to perform all maneuvers outlined in the PTS to FAA Private Pilot proficiency standards
  • Perform all Private Pilot maneuvers to the proficiency standards required by the PTS for Private Pilot Certification
  • Become familiar with the accepted procedures and concepts pertaining to aeronautical decision making and judgment, including CRM
  • Gain an understanding of aeronautical decision-making and judgment
  • Develop a sound understanding of the planning process for a cross-country flight
  • Become familiar with the details of flying a typical cross-country flight, including evaluation of in-flight weather and decisions for alternative actions
  • Complete, stage 3 examination on aircraft performance, navigation, aeronautical decision making and cross-country with a minimum score of 80%
  • Complete final examination A, with a minimum score of 80%
  • Complete final examination B, with a minimum score of 80%

PRIVATE PILOT PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS II

AVP 138

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5171 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

INSTRUMENT PILOT I

AVP 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5181 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/20

Credits: 4

Introduces skills that will establish a strong foundation in basic attitude instrument flying and basic instrument navigation. Prerequisite: FAA Private Pilot Certificate. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Conduct takeoffs and landings at or exceeding the Private Pilot level. Control aircraft under instrument reference with full panel instruments
  • Demonstrate an understanding of and basic competence in full panel instrument attitude control.
  • perform aircraft control under instrument reference while maintaining altitude within 200 feet, heading within 15 degrees and airspeed within 15 knots
  • Display an understanding of the aircraft systems related to IFR operations and the importance of IFR takeoff preparations
  • Exhibit a basic understanding of systems and equipment related to IFR operations
  • Precisely control the airplane using full panel instrument reference
  • Recognize the approach of stalls and demonstrate the correct recovery procedures from unusual flight attitudes
  • Recognize and understand the effect of instrument systems and equipment malfunctions
  • Recognize the chain in instrument crosscheck necessary to maintain aircraft control while using partial panel procedures
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of IFR systems operation and recognize systems and equipment malfunctions
  • Recognize and recover from stalls using full and partial panel instrument reference
  • Perform correct recovery techniques from unusual attitudes using full and partial panel instrument reference

INSTRUMENT PILOT II

AVP 145

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5191 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/20

Credits: 4

Perform precision attitude instrument flight, including advanced navigation techniques and procedures. Prerequisite: AVP 140 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize and recover from stalls using full and partial panel instrument reference
  • Perform correct recovery technique’s from unusual attitudes using full and partial panel instrument reference
  • Display basic knowledge of VOR interception and radial tracking
  • Demonstrate increased competency in basic VOR and ADF procedures
  • Demonstrate increased proficiency in all VOR procedures
  • Demonstrate increased understanding of NDB procedures
  • Complete the instrument rating exercises in the FAR/ AIM with an 80% or higher
  • Demonstrate understanding of airport environment and lighting, as well as airspace usage and sources of flight information during oral quizzing
  • Complete chapter 3 questions for section A with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of enroute and terminal ATC services during oral quizzing
  • Complete chapters 3 B questions with a minimum passing score of 80%.

INSTRUMENT PILOT III

AVP 150

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51A1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/20

Credits: 4

Apply advanced navigation techniques and perform holding pattern entry procedures. Prerequisite: AVP 145 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate increased proficiency in full and partial panel VOR procedures
  • Understand concepts involved with localizer tracking
  • Demonstrate accurate VOR and NDB orientation in full panel and partial panel situations
  • Perform correct recovery techniques from unusual attitudes using full and partial panel instrument reference
  • Demonstrate the correct recovery techniques from stalls using positive control techniques with a minimum loss of altitude
  • Demonstrate accurate VOR and NDB orientation and tracking at all times
  • Perform correct recovery techniques from unusual attitudes using full and partial panel instrument reference
  • Use recovery techniques from stalls using positive control techniques with a minimum loss of altitude
  • Demonstrate basic understanding and proficiency in VOR and NDB holding pattern procedures
  • Maintain orientation at all times during both standard and nonstandard VOR holding procedures
  • Exhibit basic understanding and skill in standard NDB holding procedures
  • Perform the correct entry procedures for intersection and DME holding patterns

INSTRUMENT PILOT PRACTICE III

AVP 152

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51B1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

INSTRUMENT PILOT IV

AVP 155

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51C1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 3/20

Credits: 4

Perform holding patterns and instrument approach procedures. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AVP 150 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform the correct entry procedures for intersection and DME holding patterns
  • Explain and use the information displayed on the approach charts
  • Execute several initial and intermediate approach segments to arrive at the final approach fix
  • Complete the final approach and let down to the missed approach fix
  • Demonstrate the missed approach procedure as appropriate to the published chart used
  • Exhibit knowledge of front and back course localizer tracking while maintaining specific descent rates and altitudes
  • Demonstrate glide slope bracketing, using altitude changes to control airspeed and descent rates
  • Interpret and integrate information presented in graphic weather products during an oral quiz
  • Complete Chapter 9D questions with a minimum score of 80%

INSTRUMENT PILOT V

AVP 160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51D1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 3/20

Credits: 4

Perform cross country flight using advanced navigation procedures. Use ATC communication procedures and conduct instrument departures, arrivals, and approaches. Prerequisite: AVP 155 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate basic understanding and proficiency in VOR and NDB holding pattern procedures
  • Maintain orientation at all times during both standard and non-standard VOR holding procedures
  • Exhibit basic understanding and skill in performing standard NDB holding procedures
  • Demonstrate skill and knowledge to perform the correct holding pattern entries and procedures for standard and non-standard on-station holds
  • Demonstrate ability to fly non-standard NDB and localizer holding patterns using appropriate entry, timing, and wind correction procedures
  • Perform the correct entry procedures for intersection and DME holding patterns
  • Explain and use the information displayed on the approach charts
  • Execute several initial and intermediate approach segments to arrive at the final approach fix
  • Complete the final approach and let down to the missed approach fix
  • Demonstrate the missed approach procedure as appropriate to the published chart used
  • Perform a no-gyro radar approach
  • Demonstrate proficiency in holding patterns, non-precision approaches and missed approaches

INSTRUMENT PILOT VI

AVP 170

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51F1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 3/20

Credits: 4

Acquire the flight and aeronautical knowledge proficiency required for the issuance of the FAA Instrument-Airplane Rating. Prerequisite: AVP 160 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate thorough understanding of cross-country and simulated emergency procedures appropriate for the aircraft
  • Exercise command of the aircraft at all times, using sound judgment and accurately comply with ATC procedures and clearances
  • Develop competency and skill in utilizing resource management and decision making skills.
  • Understand appropriate emergency procedures and resource management and decision making for enroute IFR operations
  • Demonstrate complete understanding of IFR cross-country procedures
  • Perform all IFR and pertinent simulated emergency procedures at the instrument pilot proficiency level as outline in the current PTS
  • Demonstrate understanding of weather factors and weather hazards during oral quizzing.
  • Complete Chapter 9 A, B questions with a minimum score of at least 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of information contained in printed weather reports and forecasts during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 9C questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Interpret and integrate information presented in graphic weather products during an oral quiz
  • Complete Chapter 9D questions with a minimum score of 80%

INSTRUMENT PILOT PRACTICAL STANDARDS IV

AVP 172

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51G1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

COMMERCIAL PILOT I

AVP 175

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51H1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/20

Credits: 4

Acquire initial VFR cross-country flight training. Pilotage, dead-reckoning, and radio navigation will be covered. Prerequisite: FAA Private Pilot Certificate, Instrument-Airplane Rating. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate ability to act as pilot in command on a cross country flight of at least two hours to include a straight line distance of 100 nm from Clover Park
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and the precautions and procedures appropriate to flying at night.
  • Use sound judgment during pilot in command night flight
  • Demonstrate understanding of the airport environment, airspace, and flight information during oral quizzing
  • Demonstrate understanding of weather factors, weather hazards, printed reports and forecasts and graphic weather products during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 3A and Chapter 9 questions with a minimum passing score of 80%

COMMERCIAL PILOT II

AVP 180

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51J1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional VFR cross-country flight training. Additional flight training will encompass mountain flying techniques and local night flight operations. Prerequisite: AVP 175 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Use sound judgment during pilot in command night flight
  • Demonstrate correct operating procedures for night cross-country flights
  • Perform a two hour cross-country at night with the destination at least 100mn from Thun Field
  • Conduct a solo night flight to an airport with an operating control tower and perform takeoff and landings.
  • Complete Chapter 3A and Chapter 9 questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of pilotage and dead reckoning methods for cross-country VFR flight during oral quizzing
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the physiological factors, especially vision, affecting the pilot in flight operations during oral quizzing
  • Demonstrate understanding of FAR and NTSB Part 830 during oral quizzing

COMMERCIAL PILOT III

AVP 185

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51K1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 6/20

Credits: 4

Receive final training in VFR cross-country flight and night operations. The necessary cross-country flight hours required for Commercial Pilot Certification will be completed. Prerequisite: AVP 180 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Conduct a solo night flight to an airport with an operating control tower and perform takeoff and landings
  • Demonstrate ability to perform night flight to a level required of a Commercial Pilot
  • Demonstrate ability to accomplish a night cross-country flight
  • Explain operational and safety considerations associated with night cross-country flights
  • Demonstrate skill in cross-country planning by selecting optimum cruising altitudes and appropriate check points
  • Demonstrate fuel planning by accurately calculating fuel burn and provisions for an adequate reserve upon landing
  • Conduct a solo cross-country to a point more than 50 nm from the departure point and gain proficiency at operating at unfamiliar airports
  • Conduct a solo cross country flight
  • Gain proficiency conducting cross-country operations using radio navigation
  • Conduct a solo cross-country and compare the revised ETA to the ATA at each checkpoint. The difference should not be greater than 5 minutes
  • Conduct a cross-country flight with landings at a point exceeding 50 nm from the school, while adhering accurately to the preplanned navigation log

COMMERCIAL PILOT IV

AVP 210

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51L1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Receive initial flight and ground training in high performance Commercial Pilot Certification maneuvers. Flight maneuver training includes chandelles, lazy eights, steep power turns, and accuracy landings. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AVP 185 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Gain proficiency in planning and performing slow flight, stalls and ground reference maneuvers
  • Display a working knowledge of airplane systems
  • Exhibit at least Private Pilot proficiency in the performance of basic flight operations
  • Demonstrate pilot in command proficiency in the training aircraft by being familiar with flight characteristics, systems and emergency procedures
  • Demonstrate pilot in command proficiency in the training aircraft with the flight characteristics, systems and emergency procedures per PTS standards
  • Demonstrate understanding of weather factors, weather hazards, printed reports and forecasts and graphic weather products during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 9 questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Complete chapter 10 questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate through oral quizzing that the student has a thorough knowledge of chapter’s 9, 10.
  • Demonstrate understanding of Chapter 3-9 through oral quizzing

COMMERCIAL PILOT V

AVP 215

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51M1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Gain additional aeronautical knowledge and flying skills necessary for the performance of advanced precision flight maneuvers. Prerequisite: AVP 210 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate pilot in command proficiency in the training aircraft by being familiar with flight characteristics, systems and emergency procedures
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the smooth and accurate performance of the stall series, slow flight and specialty takeoff and landings
  • Demonstrate the correct procedure for short and soft field takeoffs and landings, with all landings not more than 100 feet beyond the selected point
  • Demonstrate steep power turns
  • Perform basic ground reference maneuvers while maintaining a specified altitude and ground track.
  • Display an understanding of the entry, performance, and recovery from, steep turns, chandelles, stall and spin recognition and recovery
  • Demonstrate correct entry and recovery procedures during the performance of lazy eights, chandelles, normal takeoffs and landings and eights on pylons
  • Perform all of the current Commercial Pilot maneuvers outlined in the Commercial PTS
  • Demonstrate understanding of retractable landing gear systems during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 11C questions with a minimum score of at least 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of advanced aerodynamic concepts during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 12A questions with a minimum score of 80%

COMMERCIAL PILOT VI

AVP 220

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51N1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Receive advanced training in all the required Commercial Pilot Certification maneuvers. Flying proficiency in these maneuvers will meet the requirements set forth in the FAA Practical Test Standards. Prerequisite: AVP 215 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform all of the current Commercial Pilot maneuvers outlined in the Commercial PTS
  • Perform stall series, mca, steep power turns, chandelles, lazy eights, eights on pylons, accuracy landings and short and soft takeoffs and landings
  • Demonstrate Commercial Pilot proficiency as outlined in the current Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards
  • Demonstrate understanding of maximum performance takeoffs and landings during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 14A with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of steep turns and chandelles during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 14B, C questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of lazy eights and eights on pylons during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 14 D&E questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of commercial pilot emergency procedures during oral quizzing
  • Demonstrate understanding of commercial pilot emergency procedures during oral quizzing

COMMERCIAL PILOT PRACTICAL STANDARDS V

AVP 223

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51P1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 3/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

COMMERCIAL PILOT VII

AVP 230

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51Q1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 4/20

Credits: 4

Operate a high-performance aircraft with retractable landing gear and constant speed propeller. Basic flight maneuvers and aircraft systems will be covered. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AVP 220 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Gain proficiency in planning and performing slow flight, stalls and ground reference maneuvers.
  • Display a working knowledge of airplane systems
  • Exhibit at least Private Pilot proficiency in the performance of basic flight operations
  • Demonstrate understanding of high performance powerplants during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 11A questions with at least an 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of environmental and ice control systems during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 11B questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of retractable landing gear systems during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 11C questions with a minimum score of at least 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of advanced aerodynamic concepts during oral quizzing

COMMERCIAL PILOT VIII

AVP 235

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51R1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 4/20

Credits: 4

Operate a high-performance aircraft with retractable landing gear and constant speed propeller. Advanced flight maneuvers as well as emergency procedures will be mastered. Prerequisite: AVP 230 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Exhibit at least Private Pilot proficiency in the performance of basic flight operations
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the smooth and accurate performance of the stall series, slow flight and specialty takeoff and landings
  • Demonstrate the correct procedure for short and soft field takeoffs and landings, with all landings not more than 100 feet beyond the selected point
  • Demonstrate steep power turns
  • Perform basic ground reference maneuvers while maintaining a specified altitude and ground track
  • Display an understanding of the entry, performance, and recovery from, steep turns, chandelles, stall and spin recognition and recovery
  • Demonstrate correct entry and recovery procedures during the performance of lazy eights, chandelles, normal takeoffs and landings and eights on pylons
  • Perform all of the current Commercial Pilot maneuvers outlined in the Commercial PTS
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and calculate aircraft performance data during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 11B questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of aircraft weight and balance computations and performance effects during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 12C questions with a minimum passing score of 80%

COMMERCIAL PILOT IX

AVP 240

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51S1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 4/20

Credits: 4

Operate a high-performance aircraft with retractable landing gear and constant speed propeller. Increase proficiency in advance flight maneuvers and emergency procedures. Obtain logbook endorsement for the operation of High Performance Airplanes. Prerequisite: AVP 235 or equivalent.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform all of the current Commercial Pilot maneuvers outlined in the Commercial PTS
  • Perform stall series, mca, steep power turns, chandelles, lazy eights, eights on pylons, accuracy landings and short and soft takeoffs and landings
  • Demonstrate Commercial Pilot proficiency as outlined in the current Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards
  • Demonstrate understanding of lazy eights and eights on pylons during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 14D,E questions with a minimum passing score of 80%
  • Demonstrate understanding of commercial pilot emergency procedures during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 13A questions with a minimum score of 80%
  • Demonstrate thorough understanding of the commercial pilot decision making during oral quizzing
  • Complete Chapter 13B questions with 80% accuracy or better
  • Complete stage 5 exam with a minimum score of 80%
  • Complete End-of Course Examination with a minimum passing score of 80% or better

COMMERCIAL PILOT X

AVP 245

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51T1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive initial preparative training to increase aeronautical skills and experience to meet the requirements for the issuance of a Commercial Pilot Certificate. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AVP 240 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Performance and knowledge of each commercial pilot maneuver should meet standards outline in current Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standard
  • Perform lazy eights with symmetrical loops, eights on pylons , chandelles and steep turns with smoothness and coordination
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the important performance elements of chandelles, lazy eights and eights on pylons
  • Performance and knowledge of each commercial pilot maneuver should meet standards outline in current Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standard

COMMERCIAL PILOT XI

AVP 250

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51U1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional preparative training to increase aeronautical skills and experience to meet the requirements for the issuance of a Commercial Pilot Certificate. Prerequisite: AVP 245 or equivalent.

Course Outcomes

  • Performance and knowledge of each commercial pilot maneuver should meet standards outline in current Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standard
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the flight characteristics, systems, and emergency procedures listed in this lesson
  • Demonstrate a high degree of proficiency in assigned instrument procedures
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the complex aircraft flight characteristics, systems, and emergency procedures assigned
  • Perform commercial pilot maneuvers in a complex aircraft

COMMERCIAL PILOT XII

AVP 255

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51V1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Receive final advanced preparative training to increase aeronautical skills and experience to meet the requirements for the issuance of a Commercial Pilot Certificate. Prerequisite: AVP 250 or equivalent.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Perform commercial pilot maneuvers in a complex aircraft
  • Demonstrate ability to safely act a pilot in command of the complex aircraft during cross-country flights
  • Display a basic competency in the normal and urgency procedures in a complex aircraft
  • Perform commercial pilot maneuvers and instrument maneuvers during a stage check and demonstrate competency which exceeds PTS standards
  • Fly instrument approaches while following the step-by-step procedure published on the approach chart
  • Display ability to descend to MDA or DH at the proper rate to a position from which a straight in or circle to land can be made
  • Perform commercial pilot maneuvers to Commercial Pilot PTS standards
  • Demonstrate during stage check complete understanding of VFR and IFR procedures, while exercising skill and judgment required of the PIC

COMMERCIAL PILOT PRACTICAL STANDARDS VI

AVP 257

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51W1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission only.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate mastery of flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate aeronautical knowledge required for flight operations and pilot certification

CERTIFIED FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR I

AVP 260

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51X1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Receive initial training in teaching and learning theory as well as overall review of commercial pilot aeronautical knowledge subject areas. Student will be trained to fly the aircraft from the right seat to Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards. Prerequisite: FAA Commercial Pilot; Airplane Certificate and Instrument Airplane Rating. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform and analyze basic flight maneuvers from the right seat of the training aircraft
  • Correctly perform and analyze slow flight, stalls, and slips from the right seat of the training aircraft
  • Accurately perform stall series, slow flight and slips from the right seat and develop the ability to perform maximum performance takeoffs and landings
  • Perform and analyze steep power turns and emergency procedures from the right seat of the training aircraft
  • Perform and correctly explain the elements required for performing chandelles and lazy-eights
  • Perform preflight preparation, normal and specialty takeoffs and landings, go-arounds and emergency procedures to Commercial Pilot PTS standards
  • Perform ground reference maneuvers, slow flight and stall series, chandelles, lazy-eights and emergency procedures to Com. Pilot PTS standards
  • Analyze and perform basic flight maneuvers and commercial maneuvers from the right seat during a stage check with the Chief Flight Instructor
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how people learn, the laws of learning and the procedures used to enhance learning through oral or written quizzing
  • Identify basic human needs, list defense mechanisms, identify means of controlling behavior, and state role of instructor during oral quiz
  • Identify the basic elements of communications process and list the barriers to effective communication during oral or written quizzing
  • List, define and describe the four -step teaching process during oral or written quizzing

CERTIFIED FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR II

AVP 265

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51Y1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 1/20

Credits: 4

Master proper teaching techniques from the right seat of the training aircraft. Develop proficiency in conducting aeronautical knowledge briefings. Successful completion will result when knowledge and proficiency meet and/or exceed FAA Practical Test Standards. Prerequisite: AVP 260 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Prepare and follow a lesson plan on basic flight maneuvers and be able to detect , analyze and correct any errors during the flight
  • Prepare a lesson plan and develop instructional techniques necessary to teach basic flight maneuvers including stalls and slips
  • While using a prepared lesson plan, practice and review the listed basic flight maneuvers to further develop instructional techniques
  • Perform specialty takeoff and landings, go-arounds and simulated emergency procedures to the proficiency level set forth in the Flight Instructor PTS
  • Perform the stall series and spin entries and recoveries, both left and right
  • Recognize the on-set of a spin and demonstrate prompt recoveries from spin entries
  • Perform all private and commercial flight maneuvers to Flight Instructor PTS proficiency standards from the right seat using a student prepared lesson plan
  • Demonstrate proficiency exceeding the requirements of the Practical Test Standards during an oral examination on aeronautical knowledge
  • Demonstrate proficiency exceeding the requirements of the Practical Test Standards during a flight test on private and commercial flight maneuvers
  • Identify and define the elements of flight instructor characteristics and responsibilities
  • Define and describe the various elements of a lesson plan and construct a sample lesson plan within a 30 minute period
  • During an oral quiz, demonstrate aeronautical knowledge that meets or exceeds the knowledge required by the current Instructor PTS standards

INSTRUMENT FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR

AVP 268

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
51Z1 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Collins, M. South Hill Campus Room 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 4

Acquire the aeronautical knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to obtain an FAA Instrument Flight Instructor Rating added to their Certified Flight Instructor Certificate. Prerequisite: FAA Commercial Pilot Airplane Certificate with Instrument Airplane Rating Certified Flight Instructor-Airplane Certificate. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Smoothly and accurately perform basic attitude instrument flight maneuvers and analyze the elements of each maneuver
  • Demonstrate increased skill in the performance of basic attitude instrument flight maneuvers
  • Demonstrate ability to accurately perform navigation tasks using VOR and ADF navigation
  • Demonstrate ability to accurately perform and correctly analyze basic attitude instrument flight maneuvers, navigation, and holding patterns
  • Accurately perform and analyze instrument approaches to the level described in the current Practical Test Standards
  • Perform and accurately analyze the elements of instrument approaches, holding patterns and emergency procedures to the current PTS standards
  • During a Stage Check with the Chief Flight Instructor, perform and analyze instrument approaches, holding patterns, and emergency procedures
  • Prepare and follow a lesson plan on basic attitude instrument flight maneuvers
  • Prepare and follow a lesson plan basic elements of VOR and ADF navigation
  • Prepare and follow a lesson plan on VOR, ADF, and holding patterns while recognizing and detecting common student errors
  • Prepare and follow a lesson plan on the execution of instrument approaches while recognizing and correcting common student errors
  • Using a prepared lesson plan, perform all flight maneuvers required for the Instrument Instructor Rating to a level exceeding the standards in the PTS

PATISSERIE I

BAKE 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3501 6 a.m. 10 a.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 0/20

Credits: 7

Provides students with the opportunity to attain fundamental cooking, time-management and production competencies in the program-run bistro. These include scones, muffins and cookies; demonstrating how to read, write and follow a standard recipe; and understanding the basic principles of various cooking methods. Students will uphold a high level of professionalism. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate basic baking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

DESSERT ALTERNATIVES

BAKE 114

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3531 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $54.75 6/20

Credits: 3

Covers how to make sugar-free, vegan, and gluten-free desserts. Students explore how to develop and use special ingredients, techniques and methods when making desserts not using standard ingredients such as eggs, butter, white flour, and milk.

Course Outcomes

  • Use different thickeners to create vegan desserts
  • Develop various gluten free desserts using flour alternatives
  • List five flour alternatives
  • Demonstrate sugar free desserts
  • Develop sugar free, gluten free and vegan dessert recipes
  • Define what it means to make food vegan, gluten free, or sugar free

PATISSERIE II

BAKE 115

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3511 6 a.m. 10 a.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 4/20

Credits: 7

Provides students with the opportunity to refine fundamental cooking, time management, and production competencies in the program-run bistro. These include scones, muffins, cookies and cake; demonstrating how to read, write and follow a standard recipe; and understanding the basic principles of various cooking methods. Students will uphold a high level of professionalism. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate intermediate baking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

PATISSERIE III

BAKE 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3521 6 a.m. 10 a.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $54.75 2/20

Credits: 7

Introduces students to the experience of managing, training, and mentoring fellow classmates. Provides students with the opportunity to further refine fundamental cooking, time management, and production competencies in the program-run bistro. These include scones, muffins, cookies and cake; demonstrating how to read, write and follow a standard recipe; and understanding the basic principles of various cooking methods. Students will uphold a high level of professionalism. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate advanced Baking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

RESTAURANT DESSERTS

BAKE 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3541 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF In-Person $54.75 6/20

Credits: 5

Introduces students to the challenges of creating individual desserts for restaurants. Students will make individual desserts for the college restaurant and learn the detailed art of the Petit Fours.

Course Outcomes

  • Create consistent presentations for individual plated desserts
  • Develop skills in composing various petits fours
  • Demonstrate the assembly process of individual desserts and petite fours
  • Repair decorating mistakes on desserts quickly and efficiently
  • Demonstrate proper cutting techniques for petits fours and individual desserts
  • Show proper covering techniques using fondant, liquid fondant and other coatings
  • Design individual finishing touches for the petits fours and individual desserts

SUGAR WORK

BAKE 153

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3551 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $54.75 6/20

Credits: 3

Introduces students to the stages of sugar work. Students will demonstrate how to make various sugar-based candies and pulled sugar items. The coloring and handling of sugar flowers and ribbons will also be demonstrated in this course.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate proper coloring techniques
  • Complete various hard candies
  • Demonstrate proper sugar handling techniques using pulling, casting, and blowing
  • Demonstrate how to work with Isomalt Sugar and rock sugar
  • Design and color sugar flowers and ribbons

WEDDING CAKES

BAKE 157

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3561 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Newman, S. Bldg. 23, Rm. 308 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $50 6/20

Credits: 3

Covers elaborate techniques used in the composition, design, and execution of wedding cakes. The use of gum paste, fondant, and modeling chocolate will be explored. Students will develop a cake rendering on the spot with a customer.

Course Outcomes

  • Design color, decoration, and flow of a 3 tiered cake on paper
  • Demonstrate proper tiering techniques for cakes of various heights and layouts
  • Identify different fillings and cakes and describe the best uses of each
  • Demonstrate proper flat icing techniques
  • Complete a consultation with a client in a professional manor
  • Create patterns using various piping techniques and decorating tools
  • Execute a 3 tiered wedding cake using their planned design
  • Explain how to transport and assemble cakes to various locations
  • Repair flaws in a cake under pressure and time restraints in a professional manner
  • Demonstrate and explain the proper use of fondant, gum paste, modeling chocolate and various frostings

RETAIL AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

BAKE 161

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
32D1 9 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Jolly, W. Bldg. 23, Rm. 101 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 WThF Web-Enhanced $75 1/18

Credits: 4

Familiarizes students with all aspects of retail service, cashiering and retail displays. Included are opening/closing procedures, retail layout and presentation, customer service, leadership, sanitation and safety, proper cash handling, and sales techniques. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand and model merchandising product to customers
  • Plan and execute a pre-shift meeting
  • Utilize proper cash handling in a retail environment
  • Understand and execute opening and closing procedures
  • Practice appropriate retail sanitation and safety
  • Demonstrate the ability have a consultation with customers for specialty items and events
  • Produce a plan for displaying items based on sales and marketing plan

GENERAL BIOLOGY W/LAB

BIOL&160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0503 8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noffke, W. Bldg. 21, Rm. 235 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 WF Hybrid $36 10/20
0504 10 a.m. 12 p.m. Noffke, W. Bldg. 21, Rm. 235 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 WF Hybrid $36 15/20

Credits: 5

Provides an introduction to cellular biology for students preparing for the health professions. Major concepts include the structure, reproduction, and metabolism of cells; genetics; ecological perspectives; and evolutionary biology. Prerequisites: COMPASS reading score of 81 and writing score of 77 or successful completion of ENG 094.

Lab Times

Item 0503 has additional lab times from 9-10 a.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays.

Item 0504 has additional lab times from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays.

Course Outcomes

  • Develop a list of characteristics of living things, and arrange the levels of organization from simplest to most complex
  • Demonstrate the methodology of scientific inquiry by using observation, experimentation, data collection and interpretation in everyday problem solving and generation of new knowledge
  • Recognize that the proper subject matter of science is the natural (physical) world and that all science is based on common laws or principles
  • Distinguish between inorganic and organic compounds, and describe the properties of carbon that make it the central component of organic compounds
  • Identify the major functional groups present in organic compounds and describe their properties and interactions. Compare the functions and chemical compositions of the major groups of organic compounds: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids
  • Demonstrate the special properties of water that support life
  • Compare and Contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Describe the structure and function of all of the organelles and their relationship to each other. Understand the fluid mosaic model of the cell membrane and how structure is related to function
  • Compare and contrast potential energy and kinetic energy. Describe how the first and second laws of thermodynamics relate to living systems
  • Explain the chemical structure of ATP and its central role in metabolism. Describe the relationship between enzyme properties and types and rates of chemical reactions
  • Describe the interdependence between photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Explain that all three domains of life must perform some form of cellular respiration
  • Discuss the significance of chromosomes in terms of their information content
  • Compare the roles of mitosis and meiosis in reproduction
  • Solve inheritance problems using Mendel’s principles
  • Relate the chemical and physical features of DNA to the structure proposed by Watson, Crick, and Franklin
  • Outline the flow of genetic information in cells from DNA to protein and how this process may be controlled
  • Articulate the scientific origins of biotechnological developments and evaluate the ecological, social, cultural, personal and ethical implications of those developments
  • Distinguish between environmentally induced and inherited abnormalities
  • Explain why evolution is the central theme of all biology, and how heritable variation and selection are the basis for evolution in a given environment
  • Use various laboratory techniques, including compound and dissecting microscopes and gel electrophoresis

HUMAN BIOLOGY W/LAB

BIOL&175

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0505 11 a.m. 12 p.m. Korpal, R. Bldg. 15, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $36 20/20
0506 Arranged Arranged Noffke, W. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $36 20/20

Credits: 5

An in-depth approach to body systems, emphasizing the relationship between structure and functions. A laboratory course appropriate for non-science majors or for students beginning study in life sciences. Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading Score of 81 and Writing Score of 77 or successful completion of ENG 94.

Note

Item# 0506 requires students to have a web cam.

Lab Times

Item 0505 has additional lab times from 12-2 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays.

Item 0506 has additional lab times from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Tuesday July 14 and Aug. 4.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe, recognize, label or diagram the arrangement of the atom with its subatomic particles
  • Determine bonding types or recognize descriptions of chemical bonding of atoms
  • Calculate pH and determine whether a solution is acidic, basic, or neutral based upon pH
  • Describe, recognize, and determine general characteristics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and evaluate their integration into the body via daily nutrition
  • List, describe, diagram, and locate within a cell the organelles and other cellular features such as the cytoskeleton
  • Diagram and describe the cellular processes of replication, transcription, translation, diffusion, osmosis, active transport, mitosis, meiosis, cell life cycle
  • List, describe, and recognize the major function and criteria for the classification of the four basic tissue types: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nerve
  • Label or list, describe or recognize the various layers of the skin and discuss their homeostatic interaction with each other and other body systems
  • Identify the major components of the skeletal system and describe the interaction of these components to the other body systems
  • Compare the types of muscle tissue by gross and microscopic structure, location, and function
  • Identify, describe and summarize the major components of the nervous system and describe the interaction of these components with other body systems
  • Diagram and describe the process of neural transmission
  • Identify, describe and contrast general and specific senses and evaluate homeostatic regulation of the body following internal and external stimuli
  • Locate, summarize and compare the endocrine organs and their hormonal functions within the body to maintain homeostasis
  • Name, summarize, determine function and differentiate the blood components
  • Designate, explain, and trace the heart actions with how they are initiated, identified, and controlled along with the resulting body reactions to these activities
  • Define, generalize and contract blood vessel anatomy and physiology with reference to pulse, cardiovascular disease, and major organ drainage
  • Summarize components and function of the lymphatic system emphasizing relationship to circulatory and endocrine systems and immune defense of the body
  • Label, describe, and contrast the various organs of the respiratory, digestive, reproductive and urinary systems with regard to function, structure and effect on other systems, including a brief summary of pre-natal development
  • Cite and interpret the need for proper nutrition for optimal metabolism with relation to its effect on all the major body systems and processes
  • Communicate summary knowledge of the importance of fluid, electrolytes, and pH balance to maintaining homeostasis with the systems and the body as a whole
  • Explore the systems of the body in the lab using models, posters, virtual models, and examination tools

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

BIOL&241

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0507 8 a.m. 9 a.m. Korpal, R. Bldg. 21, Rm. 231 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $36 14/24

Credits: 5

Provides students with the first course of the two-quarter study of body structure and related physiology on cellular through system levels. Includes an in-depth study of cells; tissues; and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Laboratory component included. BIOL& 160 with a grade of 2.0 or better and CHEM& 110 with a grade of 2.0 or better. (Note: BIOL 118 will be accepted as a prerequisite in place of BIOL& 160 through June 2015.)

Lab Times

Item 0507 has additional lab times from 9-11 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays.

Course Outcomes

  • Define, differentiate and correlate Anatomy and Physiology, the study of structure and function
  • Understand the structural organization of the human body including a basic knowledge of the 11 body systems, the organs included in each and their basic function
  • Know anatomical terms, body regions and directional terms
  • Learn basic chemistry and biology concepts as they relate to human anatomy and physiology
  • Develop a full understanding of the structure and function of the four basic tissue types that make up the human body which essentially “carries” out the functions of each body system
  • Specifically learn in detail the structure and function of the Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular and Nervous Systems
  • Correlate the lecture concepts with laboratory training aids for a better appreciation and understanding of the course content
  • Demonstrate hands on competency in microscopy using their own cheek swab slides as well as prepared histology slides
  • Develop essential dissection skills using preserved cats, brains and eyes
  • Perform basic neurological assessment tests such as opthalmoscopy, otoscopy and visual tests
  • Apply their anatomy and physiology knowledge in common personal and clinical situations
  • Complement their educational enrichment on Anatomy and Physiology with new and recent breakthroughs on topics covered through individual research and scientific paper writing

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

BIOL&242

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0508 8 a.m. 9 a.m. Korpal, R. Bldg. 21, Rm. 231 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $36 7/24
0509 1:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Slegers, E. Bldg. 21, Rm. 235 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh In-Person $11 8/24

Credits: 5

Provides students with the second course of the two-quarter study of body structure and related physiology on cellular through system levels. Includes an in-depth study of body organization and cardiovascular and lymphatic physiological processes. Includes immunology, respiratory, digestive, metabolic, excretory, reproductive and endocrine systems. Laboratory component included. Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL& 241 or grade of C or 2.0 or better

Lab Times

Item 0508 has additional lab times from 9-11 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Item 0509 has additional lab times from 3:30-4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand the various concepts and principles presented with each body system to be covered in this course
  • Know detailed anatomical structures of specific internal organs studied
  • Appreciate the function and relevance of individual structures that make up the complete human being
  • Demonstrate hands on competency in microscope use with sample tissue slides of specific body organs
  • Correlate the lecture concepts with laboratory training aids for a better appreciation and understanding of the course content
  • Learn basic clinical skills such as auscultation, percussion, palpation, basic EKG reading, blood pressure reading and respiratory evaluation
  • Apply their anatomy and physiology knowledge in common clinical situations
  • Exhibit proficient dissection skills of preserved cats, sheep hearts and kidneys
  • Complement their educational enrichment on Anatomy and Physiology with computer-generated laboratory simulations of common clinical situations
  • Apply their anatomy and physiology knowledge in common personal and clinical situations
  • Demonstrate good relational dynamics during group
  • Presentations/homework assignments

MICROBIOLOGY

BIOL&260

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0510 Arranged Arranged Noffke, W. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $36 12/24

Credits: 5

Provides students with the content of diversity, structure, and physiology of beneficial and harmful microbes. Laboratory practice in identification of microbial species through culturing, staining, and biochemical testing. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL& 160 with a grade of 2.0 or better and CHEM& 110 with a grade of 2.0 or better. (Note: BIOL 118 will be accepted as a prerequisite in place of BIOL& 160 through June 2015.)

Note

Items 0510 requires students to have a web cam.

Lab Times

Item 0510 has additional lab times from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Tuesday, July 21 and 28.

Course Outcomes

  • Knowledge of the history of microbiology as a science
  • Historical perspectives of microbial classification, genetics and disease
  • Relate historical microbiology to current and past events where microbial organisms play a key role
  • Describe the roles of microbes in the environment, food technology, industry, biowarfare, and bioterrorism.
  • Identify and compare categories of cellular and acellular agents known as microbes
  • Identify and compare structures, functions, and characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
  • Understand the roles of chemicals and chemical structure, bonding, reactions, and organic macromolecules in growth and metabolism of microbes
  • Describe the conditions promoting growth of bacteria and viruses, including metabolism and nutrition
  • Identify and describe a selection of diseases of bacterial and viral etiology, including the structure and characteristics of the organism, the relationship with the host, and host defenses
  • Identify techniques in culturing a selection of organisms
  • Describe historical and current issues of prions and prion implicated diseases
  • Describe genetic transfer among bacteria and the consequences
  • Describe structure and function of the genome, mutations, gene transfer, and their use in recombinant DNA technology
  • Identify mechanisms of pathogenicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents
  • Describe the infectious disease process, symbiotic and parasitic relationships, and epidemiology
  • Identify mechanisms of resistance and immunity to infectious diseases, including nonspecific and specific host immune responses, role of immunization, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency
  • Discuss methods of physical, chemical, and chemotherapeutic control of microorganisms, and the roles of antimicrobial agents
  • Discuss and demonstrate correct technique in microscopy, staining, classification of microbes, along with aseptic / sterile lab techniques
  • Apply basic concepts of microbiology to the world outside of the classroom
  • Understand the diversity in populations affected by microbial diseases and the role of socioeconomic factors in control of these diseases

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

BUS 310

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
BA21 Arranged Arranged Arranged Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $25 1/18

Credits: 5

Teaches students some of the techniques necessary to develop realistic and comprehensive project plans; identify risk areas; monitor the plans; and deal with problems. The course will also cover management of the procurement process, and communication with project stakeholders. Prerequisites: ENGL& 101.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

CAH 102

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3001 9 a.m. 10 a.m. Freyre, M. Bldg. 03, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 13/30
3011 Arranged Arranged Freyre, M. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 13/30
3021 Arranged Arranged Freyre, M. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $29.75 3/30
3031 Arranged Arranged Scott, P. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 24/30

Credits: 5

Provides students with the basic techniques of medical word building using basic word elements. The class will be organized according to specific body systems and will include key terms and the introduction of anatomical, physiological and pathological terms.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of medical word building using basic word elements
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of diagnostic and therapeutic terms that provide a solid foundation for medical terminology
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of major prefixes of position, number and measurement, direction and other parameters
  • Demonstrate proficiency in pronunciation of various multiple medical terms that are common to a medical environment

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH PROFESSIONS

CAH 103

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3041 Arranged Arranged Freyre, M. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 1/30

Credits: 5

Provides an overview of the law and ethics a student should know to help provide competent, compassionate care to patients.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate proficiency in privacy of health information, standards for electronic transactions of health information and claims, security of electronic health information and national identifiers for the parties in health care transactions
  • Demonstrate proficiency by obtaining 7-hour certificate in the etiology, and epidemiology of HIV/AIDS, transmission and infection control, testing and counseling, clinical manifestations and treatment, legal and ethical issues surrounding HIV/AIDS and psycho-social issues of HIV/AIDS
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the various laws surrounding the healthcare health care industry in general, an understanding of the various laws that affect allied health professionals and examine the various ethical issues in health care today per HIPAA
  • Discuss and explore the history and trends in health care, basic health care concepts and skills, various careers and pathways in allied health and personal and professional qualities of an allied health professional
  • Successfully participate in an allied health field study which may include site-visits to profession-specific sites, interviews with allied health care professionals, research job opportunities of various allied health positions and provide wage information
  • Create a professional resume, cover letter and Thank you letter/card
  • Work effectively as a team member
  • Explore, discuss and address cultural diversity in health care

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CAH 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3051 10:10 a.m. 11:10 a.m. Mandley, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $29.75 17/30
3061 11:20 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Mandley, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $29.75 18/30
3071 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Mandley, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 16/30
3081 2 p.m. 3 p.m. Mandley, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $29.75 6/30

Credits: 5

Provides training in the uses of Microsoft Windows and related programs with an introduction to Electronic Health Records. Students will use computers to develop touch control and proper keyboarding and 10-key techniques.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate keyboarding proficiency at 20wpm
  • Utilize Microsoft Windows programs and apply knowledge through a variety of vocationally related activities
  • Develop and manage technology based specialty related projects
  • Produce a resume, cover letter, educational plan and demonstrate knowledge of their specialty and higher education opportunities in their chosen field of study

KEYBOARDING

CAS 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5701 Arranged Arranged Reygers, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 1/30
2011 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 6/20
2001 12:30 p.m. 1:25 p.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2010 MW Hybrid $29.75 3/20

Credits: 3

Use computers to develop touch control and proper keyboarding techniques; introduction to basic word-processing functions. .

CAS 105 does not meet the computer literacy requirement.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify the home row position on the keyboard. Key by touch, without looking at the keyboard. Key at a rate of 20 wpm (words per minute) or more
  • Key the numeric keys by touch
  • Use symbol keys correctly
  • Build keying speed and accuracy
  • Use basic word processing skills to create, edit, and format documents efficiently. Accurately format business letters, memos, reports, and tables

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING

CAS 115

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2031 9:20 a.m. 10:15 a.m. Wilson, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 6/20
2021 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 17/20

Credits: 3

Explore personal computer concepts from a user’s perspective. In this introductory course, learn computer terminology; run programs; save, retrieve, and search for files; use help; and perform computer maintenance. Develop basic skills in word processing, Internet, email and PowerPoint.

Course Outcomes

  • Use the mouse to point, click, double click and secondary mouse click; describe the Windows interface; arrange open windows; switch between windows; use Help; and shut down Windows with 100% accuracy
  • Start and exit a program, use the calculator and WordPad, copy and paste, save and print a document, open files, and close a frozen program with 100% accuracy
  • View disk contents; sort disk contents; format and copy a disk; and create a new folder on a disk with 100% accuracy
  • Select, copy, rename, move, delete, restore, and find files with 100% accuracy
  • Customize the taskbar, Start Menu, mouse, and keyboard. Students will also create shortcuts, adjust the clock, and use the Classic desktop with 100% accuracy
  • Change the background, change desktop colors, create a screensaver, and assign sounds to program events with 100% accuracy

WORD I

CAS 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2051 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 11/20
2041 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 14/20

Credits: 3

Use beginning word-processing techniques while creating and editing business documents. Create tables, columns, envelopes and mailing labels. Work with special features to track and review changes and compare documents.

Course Outcomes

  • Start Word. Create new documents. Insert and edit text, symbols, and special characters. Check spelling and grammar. Correct errors. Use AutoCorrect feature. Save documents using various file formats. Preview and print documents, envelopes, and labels. Organize documents using file folders. Use Word help and the research functions
  • Format text and paragraphs. Change default size of text. Bold, underline, and italicize selected text. Align and space paragraphs. Undo and redo commands or actions. Move, copy, and paste text. Insert and modify content in headers and footers. Add footnotes. Insert manual page breaks. Find and replace text
  • Insert and modify tables. Create bulleted lists, numbered lists, and outlines. Set and use tabs. Apply and format columns
  • Modify document layout and page setup. Change margin settings and page orientation. Review and modify document properties. Go to a specific location in a document. Change and organize document views and windows
  • Create and preview Web pages. Insert and modify hyperlinks
  • Insert, position, and size graphics. Create and modify diagrams and charts
  • Identify the components of business letters and memos. Create and modify business letters and memos
  • Understand the risks from Internet usage, email, and using removable devices in multiple machines. Utilize programs to scan for computer risks
  • Use search engines and URLs to find information on the Internet. Evaluate the credibility of Web sites. Understand security and privacy issues
  • Communicate electronically. Open, reply, and forward messages. Attach and open files
  • Understand the legal and ethical use of information and computer resources
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

WORD II

CAS 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2061 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 1/20

Credits: 3

Explore advanced word processing with Microsoft Word. Perform mail merges, create styles, use advanced graphics tools, create basic forms with formulas, and utilize advanced report functions, including indexes. Create macros and modify the Word environment. Prerequisite: CAS 121

Course Outcomes

  • Control formatting options. Create and modify styles. Control pagination
  • Use the Mail Merge Wizard. Insert and edit merge fields in a main document. Utilize other data sources for merged data. Merge and print form letters. Sort and filter data records. Address and print mailing labels. Address and print envelopes
  • Sort lists and tables. Insert and update table formulas. Modify table formats
  • Create and modify basic forms. Create and modify a document background. Protect and restrict forms and documents
  • Insert and modify objects. Use advance layout features to format, position, and resize graphics. Create and modify diagrams and charts using data from other sources
  • Create and manage master documents and subdocuments. Insert and modify endnotes, footnotes, captions, cross-references, indexes, and reference tables
  • Summarize document content using automated tools. Use automated tools to navigate a document including the document map. Save documents using XML. Publish and edit Web documents
  • Activate and modify tracked change options. Manage document versions. Attach digital signatures. Customize document properties
  • Create, edit, and run macros. Customize menus and toolbars. Modify Word default settings
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

EXCEL I

CAS 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2081 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 6/20
2071 1:20 p.m. 2:15 p.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 1/20

Credits: 3

Create and analyze professionally formatted spreadsheets. Enter data, formulas and functions. Create charts and insert graphics. Sort and filter lists. Prerequisite: Math 82 skills preferred.

Course Outcomes

  • Open, save, close, and print a file; navigate within and between worksheets; work with ranges; move a selection of cells; work with rows and columns
  • Work with functions; copy and paste formulas, use relative and absolute references; use Average, MAX, MIN, IF, OR, AND, and PMT functions; use AutoSum and Date functions. Use nested functions
  • Format worksheet data, work with fonts and colors, align cell contents, clear and replace formats, use styles, use AutoFormat, format the printed worksheet
  • Freeze rows and columns, use find and replace, sort data, maintain a list using a data form, filter a list using AutoFilter, use Custom AutoFilters, use conditional formatting, insert subtotals, create and use PivotTables, create a PivotChart
  • Utilize the drawing toolbar to enhance worksheets with WordArt, clipart, SmartArt, and autoshapes. Modify cells and graphics with shadows and 3-d effects
  • Add hyperlinks to a worksheet.
  • Create and modify charts
  • Understand the risks from Internet usage, email, and using removable devices in multiple machines. Utilize programs to scan for computer risks
  • Use search engines and URLs to find information on the Internet. Evaluate the credibility of Web sites. Understand security and privacy issues
  • Communicate electronically. Open, reply, and forward messages. Attach and open files
  • Understand the legal and ethical use of information and computer resources
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

EXCEL II

CAS 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2091 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 3/20

Credits: 3

Use advanced spreadsheet features and functions to analyze and project data. Learn how to use what-if analysis tools such as scenarios and solver. Create macros; validate data; link worksheets/books; use pivot tables; find errors; and share, merge, and protect workbooks. Prerequisite: CAS 130.

Course Outcomes

  • Create and apply styles and custom number formats. Use conditional formatting
  • Create and use templates. Use a data form. Manage lists using sort, subtotal, filter, and pivot table commands
  • Link worksheets and workbooks. Work with multiple workbooks. Consolidate data and share and protect workbooks. Audit workbooks
  • Use advanced functions
  • Use goal seek, solver, and scenarios to analyze data
  • Create and use macros. Create toolbars and add menu items and toolbar buttons
  • Import and export data
  • Understand the risks from Internet usage, email, and using removable devices in multiple machines. Utilize programs to scan for computer risks
  • Use search engines and URLs to find information on the Internet. Evaluate the credibility of Web sites. Understand security and privacy issues
  • Communicate electronically. Open, reply, and forward messages. Attach and open files
  • Understand the legal and ethical use of information and computer resources
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

POWERPOINT

CAS 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
20A1 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 7/20
20B1 Arranged Arranged Calip, V. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 12/20

Credits: 3

Create professionally formatted presentations that include animation and transitions. Insert and format charts, graphics, diagrams and pictures. Save presentations for various delivery options.

Course Outcomes

  • Plan and modify a presentation, use help, create notes for slides, preview and print presentations
  • Apply a design template; format the presentation; insert, resize, and recolor graphics; create a table in a slide; add and modify tab stops; create and manipulate a shape
  • Insert slides from another presentation, create a design template, apply graphics and sounds. Create and modify charts, graphics, and SmartArt. Apply special effects and custom animation. Use the Pointer Pen to mark slides during a slide show, hide slides, and prepare presentation materials
  • Apply a design template from another presentation; use integration techniques: importing, embedding, and linking. Create and edit hyperlinks; add action buttons; create and customize a toolbar
  • Understand the risks from Internet usage, email, and using removable devices in multiple machines. Utilize programs to scan for computer risks
  • Use search engines and URLs to find information on the Internet. Evaluate the credibility of Web sites. Understand security and privacy issues
  • Communicate electronically. Open, reply, and forward messages. Attach and open files
  • Understand the legal and ethical use of information and computer resources
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

PUBLISHER

CAS 145

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
20C1 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $29.75 5/20

Credits: 5

Explore desktop publishing in this project-based class. Create and edit flyers, newsletters, brochures, logos, calendars and various business publications. Use mail merge to create letters and labels. Use tools to edit text, colors, graphic design objects and logos. Prepare files for commercial printing.

Course Outcomes

  • Create and edit a publication
  • Design newsletters and tri-fold brochures
  • Prepare letterhead, mailing envelopes, and business cards
  • Create mail merge letters and envelopes
  • Personalize and customize a publication
  • Create business forms and tables
  • Link a publication to another program
  • Create Web site with fill-in form fields. Use HTML code to enhance the Web page
  • Create macros

ACCESS I

CAS 151

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
20F1 2:20 p.m. 3:15 p.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 11, Rm. 112 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 4/20
20D1 Arranged Arranged Westerberg, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 3

Develop basic relational databases as you create, edit, format, and print tables, queries, forms, and reports. Copy records and import tables from another Access database. Define field properties and create relationships. Run, sort and filter queries. Use comparison and logical operators, and perform calculations. Explore the basics of creating a cohesive database.

Course Outcomes

  • Start Access. Create a database. Create, edit, format, and print tables, queries, forms, and reports. Use the Access Help system
  • Define relationships. Specify referential integrity
  • Define fields in a table. Modify the structure of a table. Add records. Copy records and import tables from another Access database. Sort and filter data. Change field characteristics. Add and delete fields. Modify the structure of a table
  • Create a query. Use calculated fields. Calculate statistics. Save a query. Create, run, sort, and filter queries. Use text and numeric data in query criteria. Use comparison and logical operators. Create calculations
  • Use forms to add, delete, sort, find, and filter records. Update the contents of a single field
  • Create reports to display tables and query results
  • Understand the risks from Internet usage, email, and using removable devices in multiple machines. Utilize programs to scan for computer risks
  • Use search engines and URLs to find information on the Internet. Evaluate the credibility of Web sites. Understand security and privacy issues
  • Communicate electronically. Open, reply, and forward messages. Attach and open files
  • Understand the legal and ethical use of information and computer resources
  • Successfully complete a standardized test

CHEMICAL CONCEPTS W/LAB

CHEM&110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0511 Arranged Arranged Celleri, A. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $45 16/20

Credits: 5

An introduction to chemistry intended for non-science majors. This course looks at how models of atoms, bonding and the structures of materials provide an understanding of common chemical properties and reactions. Co-requisites: Students who have not completed MAT 99 or achieved a COMPASS score of 76 or higher on College Algebra must take MAT 99 concurrently with this course.

Lab Times

Item 0510 has additional lab times from 12-1:50 p.m. on Fridays.

Item 0511 has additional lab times from 2-3:50 p.m. on Fridays.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand the basic terminology concepts of science and chemistry
  • Be able to solve fundamental chemical problems
  • Gain an awareness of the impact of chemistry in the modern world
  • Develop the knowledge needed to intelligently discuss environmental, energy and similar issues of public concern
  • Be able to critically evaluate specific information in terms of problem solving

INTRO TO CHEMISTRY

CHEM&121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0512 Arranged Arranged Celleri, A. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $45 7/20

Credits: 5

Understanding the metric system, atomic theory, bonding, quantitative relationships, solutions, gases, acids and bases, salts, and nuclear chemistry. Lab included. Prerequisite(s): CHEM& 110 or high school chemistry; co-requisite: MAT 99 or higher or appropriate COMPASS placement concurrently with this course.

Item 0512 has additional lab times from 4-5:50 p.m. on Fridays.

Course Outcomes

  • List the steps in the scientific method
  • Use the metric system in measurements and dimensional analysis
  • Distinguish between chemical and physical changes
  • Explain the atomic nature of matter
  • Explain the structure of the periodic table
  • Describe the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions in terms of protons, electrons, and neutrons
  • Predict shapes and polarities of molecules
  • Describe the nature of solids, liquids, and gases
  • Write chemical formulas and balance chemical equations
  • Perform calculations using the concepts of moles, reaction stoichiometry, solution concentrations, and the gas laws
  • Explain the concepts of acids, bases, and buffers
  • Use pH in acid/base calculations
  • Work safely in the chemistry laboratory
  • Perform and analyze experiments that require precise measurements
  • Explain and apply the concept of equilibrium
  • Use pH in acid/base calculations

INTRO TO CHEMISTRY

CHEM&131

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0513 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Celleri, A. Bldg. 21, Rm. 235 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Th Hybrid $45 1/16
0514 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Celleri, A. Bldg. 21, Rm. 231 July 1, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Th Hybrid $45 4/16

Credits: 5

Additional Lab Hours:
TBD, Building 21, Room 231

Course Outcomes

  • Understand nomenclature and terminology of various organic and biologically important structures such as hydrocarbons, alcohols, amines, fats, oils, proteins, and sugars. Obtain ability to express structures pictorially as Lewis diagrams
  • Ability to determine products of reactions based on reactants used and devise strategies to synthesize complex organic molecules, sugars, and biologically important structures
  • Develop strategies to research information in textbooks and online as needed to effectively complete assignments and labs in timely and accurate manner
  • Assist peers during lab related assignments to create synergistic environment and overall course success
  • Individually complete assignments and laboratory exercises in a timely fashion in order to enhance student comprehension
  • Build knowledge database of organic and biochemical processes, terms, and strategies to understand the basics of organic and biological chemistry
  • Obtain understanding of biochemical pathways of Glycolysis and the Krebs Cycle

PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS

CIT 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5401 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Meerdink, K. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111W July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $29.75 1/20

Credits: 5

Introduction to programming concepts while enforcing good programming style and logical thinking. Designed for students with little or no programming language experience, it begins with basic general programming concepts and key concepts of structure. Course then progresses to the intricacies of decision-making, looping, array manipulation, and methods. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Install and use IDE
  • Create and assign variables in programs
  • Use built-in functions in programs
  • Write programs using strings for input as well as output
  • Create modules and use the modules
  • Create and use lists
  • Write programs using if/else statements and loops

.NET PROGRAMMING

CIT 116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5451 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 6/20

Credits: 5

Learn to program using .NET Framework with focus on windows and console. Use decision structures, loops, and arrays to solve problems. Apply exception handling and data validation to programs. Use the predefined libraries in .NET Framework to solve problems. Create methods and learn to pass and return arguments. Create classes and use the classes as objects in programming. Use databases to store and retrieve the data from the applications. Prerequisites: CIT 142, CIT 150. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Learn to use the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to write, run, and debug programs
  • Develop windows forms using controls like labels, text boxes, buttons, group boxes, check boxes, drop down list boxes, etc
  • Write programs that use decision structures like if/else, if/else if, and switch statements. Understand and use the right decision structure to solve problems
  • Create programs that require iteration using for, while, do while loops
  • Apply exception handling to programs to throw, catch, re-throw exceptions Validate for data input and appropriate type and range of input values. Write methods that can be reused in different programs
  • Use .Net classes like Math, MessageBox, InputBox, etc. to solve problems and lookup the definition of methods
  • Write a class and use it in the Form. Call the methods, static and instance to distinguish between the two. Learn about the scope of variables in classes
  • Use Sql Server database to populate the Windows form with data and also to add and update the data. Use a predefined database to accomplish this

WEB DESIGN PRINCIPLES

CIT 118

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54D1 1 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Webster, M. Bldg. 11, Rm. 107 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $29.75 11/20

Credits: 5

Explores how the web works and methods and limitations of delivering content on the web. Examines usability issues such as interface design and structure, and how to accommodate a wide variety of viewports, from smartphones to cinema screen computer monitors. Students will build a four-page portfolio style website using Notepad and Photoshop, and post it to the internet. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the principles and limitations of delivering content on the web to computers and mobile devices
  • Write HTML 5 and CSS 3 in Notepad
  • Understand and apply the CSS Box Model to Interface Design
  • Optimize graphics in Photoshop
  • Build a 4 page website with Responsive navigation
  • Upload to a web server

PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP I

CIT 119

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5441 2 p.m. 3 p.m. Meerdink, K. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111W July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $29.75 3/20

Credits: 2

Supplement programming fundamentals course to provide the student more practice with algorithms and programming constructs like if/else statements, loops, strings, arrays, and collections.

JAVA OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING I

CIT 142

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5411 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Meerdink, K. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111W July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $29.75 20/20

Credits: 5

Construct a foundation of procedural programming concepts and skills requisite for professional object-oriented software development. Use Java, a modern structured, object-oriented language, to develop your problem-solving and algorithm formulation skills. Prerequisite: CIT 101.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Learn basic java programming skills related to procedural programming constructs involving decision structures, loops and arrays
  • Learn the concepts of object-oriented programming
  • Solve small scale problems’ using the various programming constructs
  • Familiarize with the usage of the JAVA API
  • Explain what classes and objects mean

PRINCIPLES OF RELATIONAL DATABASES

CIT 150

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54A1 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $29.75 2/20

Credits: 5

Delve into the fundamental concepts, terminologies, methodologies, and system organizations of database management systems. Develop the theoretical foundation of understanding necessary to design, implement, optimize, query and maintain a database system. Propose, design and develop a database, using a relational database management system to reinforce the theoretical concepts.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Compile and Organize Data
  • Understand data types
  • Work with database structures and terminology (tables, records, fields, etc…)
  • Understand and work with relationships such as primary and foreign keys
  • Understand and apply normalization to database structure
  • Define constraints to database field information
  • Gain a foundation is Structured Query Language (SQL)

PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP II

CIT 202

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5491 2 p.m. 3 p.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 2/20

Credits: 3

Supplement programming courses like .NET or Java to provide the student more practice with object-oriented programming concepts and collections.

ADVANCED WEB DESIGN

CIT 206

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54G1 1 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Dague, B. Bldg. 11, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 8/20

Credits: 5

Provides demonstrations and practical exercises for using HTML and CSS to create attractive and well-formed web documents. Prerequisites: CIT 118, CIT 120.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand web standards and the advantages of using standards-based design
  • Understand the differences between HTML and XHTML
  • Write HTML that validates to W3C web standards
  • Understand the basic syntax of CSS
  • Understand CSS cascade order and inheritance
  • Convert table-based page layouts to CSS-based page layouts
  • Build web pages using semantic HTML and CSS-based layout without HTML tables
  • Write CSS that validates to W3C web standards

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

CIT 208

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54H1 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Dague, B. Bldg. 11, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 5

Introduces emerging technologies such as website usability, usability testing, keyword analysis, website optimization, web payment systems, search engine optimization (SEO), and search engine marketing (SEM). New technologies are always changing and therefore the material is subject to change based on instructor discretion. Prerequisite: CIT 206 or co-requisite.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Create a simple, static ecommerce web site using CSS without tables
  • Understand and apply the principles of search engine optimization
  • Perform a keyword analysis using keyword tools
  • Set up a PayPal account and use PayPal Buy Now Buttons to collect payments
  • Set up search engine marketing (pay per click) accounts and campaigns
  • Understand and apply web site usability principles to web site design
  • Conduct web site usability tests
  • Optimize a web site for speed

ADVANCED .NET PROGRAMMING

CIT 212

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5461 12 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 4/20

Credits: 5

Learn advanced .NET programming — writing classes, working with indexers, delegates, events and overload operators. Work with databases using ADO.NET, data sources and datasets, XML files, LINQ. Prerequisite: CIT 116. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Review .Net Programming fundamentals and syntax working with numeric, string, and date data; coding control structures, procedures, and event handlers
  • Work with arrays and collections like Lists
  • Learn to debug applications
  • Create classes and use them in Forms
  • Apply exception handling to programs to throw, catch, re-throw exceptions. Validate for data input and appropriate type and range of input values. Write methods that can be reused in different programs
  • Create applications that use ADO.Net to interact with the database
  • Explore advanced object-oriented concepts

.NET PROGRAMMING FOR THE WEB

CIT 214

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5471 12 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 5/20

Credits: 5

Earn professional experience in analyzing, designing, and developing active, commercial web applications for the Microsoft web server using Microsoft ASP.NET with C#, connecting to Microsoft relational database management systems. Prerequisite: CIT 116. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Describe these terms: web application, web page, web form, client, server, HTTP, HTML, HTTP request, HTTP response, postback, and round trip
  • Distinguish between static web pages and dynamic web pages
  • Design, develop, and test a multi-page web application that uses a data source to get data
  • Apply Styles, CSS Properties, and Manage Styles windows to apply and work with any of the styles that are available to a form
  • Create web pages using server controls and validation controls.
  • Understand the difference between server controls and html controls
  • Manage state for your web pages using web.config, cookies, and/or sessions
  • Use a master page to provide the elements that are the same for a set of content pages
  • Use TreeView, Menu, and/or SiteMapPath controls for site navigation
  • Use a database to make the website dynamic

.NET PORTFOLIO

CIT 216

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5481 2 p.m. 3 p.m. Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 1/20

Credits: 5

Develop a portfolio that uses the concepts learned in .NET classes. Learn and use source control to maintain code, working in teams, and testing techniques. Apply latest web trends in .NET framework to keep current with the industry. Present this portfolio to an audience. Prerequisite: CIT 214. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Configure and use source control to setup a team project
  • Analyze and derive requirements given a problem statement
  • Design classes using a modeling tool from the requirements
  • Write code from the design diagrams
  • Learn and use testing techniques for unit testing
  • Present the project to an audience

C++

CIT 218

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5431 12 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Meerdink, K. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111W July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $29.75 1/20

Credits: 5

Deals with learning programming using C++ as the primary language with a focus on problem-solving and introduction to object-oriented concepts and terms. Prerequisite: CIT 143.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Learn basic C++.Net programming skills related to procedural programming constructs involving decision structures, loops and arrays
  • Learn the concepts of object-oriented programming
  • Solve small scale problems’ using the various programming constructs
  • Explain what classes, objects and inheritance means

CLIENT-SIDE WEB PROGRAMMING

CIT 222

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54J1 9 a.m. 10:50 a.m. Dague, B. Bldg. 11, Rm. 106 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 4/20

Credits: 5

Introduces the fundamentals of working with JavaScript. Applies variables, objects, arrays, strings, conditional statements and external data to create dynamic, interactive web pages. Prerequisite: CIT 220. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the basic syntax of the JavaScript programming language
  • Declare and use variables
  • Create and use functions
  • Understand the object-based nature of the JavaScript language
  • Use JavaScript objects, methods, and events
  • Understand and use arrays
  • Use IDs and event handlers with JavaScript
  • Handle HTML forms and form validation using JavaScript

WEB ANIMATION

CIT 225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54F1 11 a.m. 12:50 p.m. Webster, M. Bldg. 11, Rm. 107 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $29.75 3/20

Credits: 5

Build complex animated advertisements, interactive games and slideshows in both jQuery and Flash. Animate menu and div box transitions using HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery. Prerequisites: CIT 118, CIT 120. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Know when to use scripted animation and when to use timeline animation and why Apply simple algebra to scripting to achieve organic movement
  • Understand Object Oriented Programming (OOP) in Actionscript 3
  • Use Jquery, HTML 5 and CSS 3 for Animation

WEB DEVELOPMENT II

CIT 227

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54K1 1 p.m. 2:50 p.m. Dague, B. Bldg. 11, Rm. 106 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 2/20

Credits: 5

Provides practical experience in integrating PHP and MySQL to create dynamic web sites, including database-driven content pages, content management systems, and interactive forms. Prerequisite: CIT 210, CIT 220.

  • Design and implement MySQL databases for e-commerce web sites
  • Use the phpMyAdmin tool to administer MySQL databases
  • Use PHP to retrieve data from, and store data in MySQL databases
  • Combine PHP and MySQL to create dynamic web sites
  • Develop database-driven content management systems
  • Design and develop dynamic, interactive web forms

CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

CIT 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54L1 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Condon, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 107 July 10, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 F In-Person $4.75 3/20

Credits: 5

Create and manage a custom Wordpress website from Photoshop mockup through HTML, CSS, JavaScript and PHP. Prerequisite: CIT 220. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Build a Photoshop Mockup of a Wordpress capable design
  • Convert Mockup to working HTML & CSS
  • Set up Wordpress on local hardrive (WAMP on PC)
  • Upload Wordpress to live server
  • Set up and modify blank template
  • Edit PHP structure as needed to suit Photoshop Mockup

DATA & LOGIC STRUCTURES

CIT 245

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5421 12 p.m. 1:50 p.m. Meerdink, K. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111W July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $29.75 2/20

Credits: 5

Expand your understanding of object-oriented programming techniques by implementing abstract data types as data structures in solving complex computing problems. Study the fundamental algorithms of computer science while using mathematical principles to analyze the efficiency of their implementation. Prerequisite: CIT 143. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Analyze code focusing on the efficiency of the structures used
  • Learn and investigate different sorting algorithms
  • Delve into different data structures like Stacks and Queues, Linked Lists, Trees, Sets and Maps
  • Understand data structures like Search trees and Graphs

SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (REPEATABLE, VARIABLE 1-5CR)

CIT 297

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54B1 Arranged Arranged Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Study an advanced or specialized subject in the field of Computer Information Technology (CIT). This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of an emerging or specialized topic not yet included in this catalog. The offering is a normal college class taught by an instructor, with the usual textbook, written assignments, lab exercises, and examinations. Course topics offered are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

INTERNSHIP

CIT 299

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
54C1 Arranged Arranged Ortiz, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 111E July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/20

Credits: 7

Earn college credit by applying learned technical skills in professional work experiences directly related to your studies in Computer Information Technology. Perform 165 hours of part-time or full-time labor as an intern with a public or private enterprise, as a paid employee, or as a volunteer. Study and practice in resume building, interviewing, and job-search skills by actually identifying and then applying for an intern position. Work site supervisor and CIT faculty will jointly evaluate your performance. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Apply and Enhance technical skills learnt in the program on a live project
  • Demonstrate accountability and professionalism at workplace by attending meetings and submitting status reports
  • Escalate issues and seek timely help when tackling a project
  • Share with the other students the deliverables from the internship

PUBLIC SPEAKING

CMST&220

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0541 3:45 p.m. 6:20 p.m. Calip, V. Bldg. 14, Rm. 212 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $0 12/25
0538 7:30 a.m. 10:10 a.m. Dotson, T. Bldg. 14, Rm. 212 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 TTh In-Person $0 24/25
0540 12:40 p.m. 3:20 p.m. Heath, T. Bldg. 14, Rm. 212 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $25 23/25
0539 12:40 p.m. 3:20 p.m. Wilhelm, D. Bldg. 14, Rm. 212 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $25 22/25

Credits: 5

An Open Course Library class; inexpensive course materials. Assists students in developing real-world oral communication skills. Capture the dynamics of today’s business realities and see the benefits of effective communication. Selection of topics, library research, analysis, oral style, use of visual aids, and preparation and delivery of various types of speeches and oral presentations are included. The Internet, email, community interaction, and other practical tools support student learning and increase public speaking skills. Emphasis is placed in principles of cultural diversity. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP placement score or successful completion of ENG 94.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain the nature, value, and requirements of effective public speaking
  • Speak effectively to groups in an academic environment
  • Speak effectively to groups in a non-academic environment
  • Apply principles of cultural diversity to public speaking
  • Employ effective information literacy techniques in public speaking

FOUNDATION FOR COLLEGE SUCCESS

COLL 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2P51 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Hughes, R. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Aug. 17, 2015 MWF Hybrid $25 11/20
2P61 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Felch, C. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 7/20
2P71 1:50 p.m. 2:45 p.m. Felch, C. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Aug. 17, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 2/20
2P81 3 p.m. 3:55 p.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 6/20
2P41 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Schwarder, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 9/20
2P31 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Holster, E. Bldg. 15, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 17, 2015 MWF Hybrid $25 7/20
2P21 9:10 a.m. 10:05 a.m. Holster, E. Bldg. 15, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 16/20
2P11 9:10 a.m. 10:05 a.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 12/20
2P01 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Schwarder, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $25 6/20

Credits: 2

Learn the skills needed to succeed at Clover Park Technical College. This class is designed to prepare students to succeed in college. This course emphasizes college success strategies, study habits and campus resources. Jump-start your college career with a class that 80% of the students who have taken it say contributed to their success at CPTC. Anyone is welcome in Foundation for Student Success, but it is required for certificate- and degree-seeking students with COMPASS placement at or below MAT 82 and/or ENG 82. This course requires attendance at an orientation at the start of each quarter in the Student Center, Building 23.

Spring quarter College 101 Orientation will be held March 25, 2015 9:00 am - 12:45 pm in Building 23.

College 101 orientation is the first day of the College 101 course and is required for students to attend. Students will met with staff members and receive information on the various programs and services that are available on campus.

Note:

The 2P24 section of COLL 101 is linked with the 5W39 section of ENG 082. See the description of ENG 082 for details.

The 2P14 section of COLL 101 is linked with the 5W38 section of ENG 082. See the description of ENG 082 for details.

The 2P74 section of COLL 101 is linked with the 5W42 section of ENG 094. See the description of ENG 094 for details.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify college resources and support services available to students
  • Describe college processes and expectations of students
  • Demonstrate basic skills in operating the CANVAS the Learning Management System (LMS) used for online courses at CPTC
  • Apply a variety of learning strategies and study skills to college coursework
  • Demonstrate self-management techniques including planning, prioritizing, and scheduling to achieve educational, personal, and/or career goals
  • Demonstrate effective communication skills
  • Demonstrate effective problem solving strategies
  • Identify beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of successful students
  • Explain the importance of participating as an active member of the campus learning community and building mutually supportive relationships with students, faculty and staff
  • Describe effective strategies for managing stress and developing emotional intelligence

MEASUREMENT, TOOLS & SAFETY

CONST105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2201 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 2/30

Credits: 2

Introduction to residential and light construction applications and trades. Explores and applies safety standards to the use of various hand and power tools associated with the carpentry field.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify carpentry tools and uses
  • Read a standard tape measure
  • Use of fractions
  • Use the adding and subtraction method for measurements
  • Show understanding of how to use a measuring tape
  • Show understanding of proper lifting techniques
  • Demonstrate ability to use proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Identify and correct safety hazards in a work area
  • Be familiar with standard building practices and why we do them

SITE LEVELING, PLANS, CODES & MATERIALS

CONST108

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2211 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/30

Credits: 2

Introduction to use and operation of a builder level, including leveling and squaring a building site. Covers building plans, codes and inspections, and construction materials.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Proper use of a builders level
  • Level and square a building site
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Introduced to basic building codes
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Identify basic engineered lumber products
  • Identify basic lumber products

FOOTINGS & FOUNDATIONS

CONST112

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2221 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/30

Credits: 3

Introduction to the methods of construction footing and foundation forms, terminology, and inspections for the typical residential home.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Set foundation footings
  • Set footing Reinforcement bar as required by code
  • Set stem wall forms
  • Set stem wall reinforcement bar as required by code
  • Square, block and support all forms
  • Comply with Code requirements

FLOOR FRAMING

CONST116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2231 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/30

Credits: 3

Introduction to the construction procedures and terminology used in framing a residential wood floor.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify all parts of the floor system using proper terminology
  • Be familiar with the different floor systems (Joists vs Post and Beam)
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed for a specified floor system
  • Comply with code requirements in relation to nailing patterns used
  • Be familiar with different Simpson Metal hangers that may be required
  • Identify basic lumber products
  • Comprehend how a floor and foundation interact
  • Demonstrate proper techniques used to build a floor system

WALL FRAMING, SHEETING & CEILINGS

CONST120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2241 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/30

Credits: 5

Introduction to wall framing construction procedures and terminology, the application of ceiling and/or two-story framing, inspections, sheeting and aligning.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify all parts of a wall system using proper terminology
  • Be familiar with the different wall systems (balloon framing and platform framing)
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Introduced to basic building codes as pertains to wall building
  • Calculate materials needed for walls to be built
  • Comply with code requirements in relation to nailing patterns and headers requirements
  • Familiar with Metal that may be required and where to apply
  • Identify basic lumber products to be used
  • Demonstrate proper technique for building walls
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

ROOF FRAMING

CONST122

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2251 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/30

Credits: 5

Introduction to roof framing and the use of a framing square, including both truss roof and stick-built residential roofs.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify different roof types and terminology used in roofing
  • Comply with different building codes as applied to roofing
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed in roofing construction and finish
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Familiar with metal requirements and where to apply
  • Identify basic lumber products used in roofing
  • Demonstrate proper building technique for building roofs
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

ROOFING MATERIALS & INSTALLATION

CONST126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2261 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 3

Introduction to various roofing materials, including proper installation techniques.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify different roofing material and terminology used in roofing
  • Comply with different building codes as applied to roofing
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed in roofing finish
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Demonstrate proper technique for finishing roofs
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION

CONST130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2271 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 Arranged Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 4

Introduction to basic stair construction, including the application of building codes, stairway arrangements, components and layout.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify different stair types and terminology used in stair construction
  • Comply with different building codes as applied to stairs
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed in stair construction
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Identify basic lumber products used in stair construction
  • Demonstrate proper building technique for constructing stairs
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

EXTERIOR FINISH

CONST134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2281 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 3

Introduction to the installation of exterior trim, siding, window and door installation, or the equivalent of typical residential homes.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify different siding & trim types and terminology used
  • Comply with different building codes as applied to siding
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed in siding and trim
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Familiar with metal requirements and where to apply (flashing)
  • Identify basic lumber products used in siding
  • Demonstrate proper building technique for siding and trim
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

INTERIOR FINISH I

CONST138

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2291 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 3

Introduction to interior wall and ceiling finish, interior doors and hardware, cabinet and countertop installation, interior trim and finish flooring.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Install Gypsum Wall board, tape and mud seams
  • Install numerous types of wall texture
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Install, square and plumb interior doors
  • Install, caulk and prep interior trim
  • Demonstrate proper building technique
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

INTERIOR FINISH II

CONST142

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
22A1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 3

Continuation of interior wall and ceiling finish, interior doors and hardware, cabinet and countertop installation, interior trim and finish flooring.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Build Standardized kitchen and bathroom cabinets
  • Be familiar with basic kitchen layout to include the working triangle
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Demonstrate proper installation methods
  • Identify basic lumber products used
  • Demonstrate proper building technique
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

DECK CONSTRUCTION

CONST146

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
22B1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Smith, D. Bldg. 05, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/20

Credits: 3

Introduction to outside deck construction, including types, code requirements and safety.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify different terminology used
  • Comply with different building codes
  • Understand basic plan symbols and measurements
  • Calculate materials needed
  • Comply with inspection requirements
  • Install decks, rails and stairs as required
  • Identify basic lumber products used
  • Demonstrate proper building technique for building roofs
  • Demonstrate safe building practices and proper use of tools and equipment

INFECTION CONTROL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

COSMO112

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5201 9:30 a.m. 8:45 p.m. Frink, B. 'WCC128 ' July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M In-Person $75 1/20
53W1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Maguire, P. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 1, 2015 July 8, 2015 TWThF Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 2

Acquire knowledge for successful and responsible infection control, first aid, and safety. Learn concepts of microbiology, safe handling of tools, proper dispensing of chemicals, and how to prevent the spread of bacteria in a school or salon.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand state laws and rules
  • List the types and classifications of bacteria
  • Define hepatitis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and explained how they are used
  • Explain the differences between cleaning disinfection and sterilizing
  • List the types of disinfectants and how they are used
  • Discuss Universal Precautions
  • List your responsibilities as a salon professional
  • Describe how to safely clean and disinfect salon tools and implements

GENERAL SCIENCE OF HAIR

COSMO116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5211 9:30 a.m. 8:45 p.m. Frink, B. 'WCC128 ' July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M In-Person $75 1/20
53X1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Maguire, P. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 9, 2015 July 22, 2015 TWThF Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 5

Learn why professional hair services must be based on an understanding of the growth, structure and composition of hair. Gain skills in evaluating various hair and scalp conditions. Understand the purpose for draping and scalp massage as a foundation for attentive client care services.

Course Outcomes

  • Name and describe the structures of the hair root
  • List and describe the three main layers of the hair shaft
  • Describe the three types of side bonds in the cortex
  • Describe the hair growth cycles
  • Discuss the types of hair loss treatment
  • Describe the options for hair loss treatment
  • Recognize hair and scalp disorders commonly seen in the salon and school and know which ones can be treated by cosmetologists
  • List and describe the factors that should be considered in a hair analysis
  • Explain the two most important requirements for scalp care
  • Describe the benefits of scalp massage
  • Treat scalp and hair that are dry, oily, or dandruff ridden
  • Explain the rile of hair brushing to a healthy scalp
  • Discuss the uses and benefits of the various types of shampoo
  • Discuss the uses and benefits of the various types of conditioners
  • Demonstrate the appropriate draping for a basic shampooing and conditioning and draping for a chemical service
  • Identify the Three-Part Procedure and explain why it is useful

PRINCIPLES OF HAIR DESIGN

COSMO121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5221 9:30 a.m. 8:45 p.m. Frink, B. 'WCC128 ' July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M In-Person $75 1/20
53Y1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Maguire, P. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 23, 2015 July 29, 2015 TWThF Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 2

Learn design and art principles as guidelines to assist you in achieving designs for the client. Gain skills in the consultation portion of hair design and practice good life skills and professional behaviors for salon success and effective communications.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the possible sources of hair design inspiration
  • List the five elements of hair design
  • List the five principles of hair design
  • Understand the influence of hair type on hairstyle
  • Identify different facial shapes and demonstrate how to design hairstyles to enhance or camouflage facial features
  • Explain design considerations for men
  • List the principles that contribute to personal and professional success
  • Create a mission statement
  • Explain how to set long-term and short-term goals
  • Discuss the most effective ways to manage time
  • Describe good study habits
  • Define ethics
  • List the characteristics of a healthy, positive attitude
  • Understand the importance of professional hygiene
  • Explain the concept of dressing for success
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ergonomic principles and ergonomically correct postures and movement
  • List the golden rules of human relations
  • Explain the definition of effective communication
  • Conduct a successful client consultation/needs assessment
  • Handle an unhappy client

APPLICATIONS OF HAIRCUTTING AND HAIRSTYLING

COSMO136

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5231 9:30 a.m. 8:45 p.m. Frink, B. 'WCC128 ' July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M In-Person $75 1/20
53Z1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Maguire, P. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 30, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWThF Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 14

Introduces the techniques and tools of haircutting and hairstyling. Students will demonstrate proper use and care of all tools and implement effective infection control principles and practices. This course provides foundational skills for good hair design.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the possible sources of hair design inspiration
  • List the five elements of hair design
  • List the five principles of hair design
  • Understand the influence of hair type on hairstyle
  • Identify different facial shapes and demonstrate how to design hairstyles to enhance or camouflage facial features
  • Explain design considerations for men
  • List the principles that contribute to personal and professional success
  • Create a mission statement
  • Explain how to set long-term and short-term goals
  • Discuss the most effective ways to manage time
  • Describe good study habits
  • Define ethics
  • List the characteristics of a healthy, positive attitude
  • Understand the importance of professional hygiene
  • Explain the concept of dressing for success
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ergonomic principles and ergonomically correct postures and movement
  • List the golden rules of human relations
  • Explain the definition of effective communication
  • Conduct a successful client consultation/needs assessment
  • Handle an unhappy client

ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF HAIR CUTTING

COSMO141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53C1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Ganyon, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 July 15, 2015 ThF In-Person $75 8/20

Credits: 4

Presents advanced skills and techniques that enable students to remain current with haircutting trends. Procedures and theory are reinforced to achieve desired effect. Infection control principles and practices are reinforced. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 136.

Course Outcomes

  • Know theory of advanced haircutting in current trends
  • Independent practical applications of advanced haircutting in current trends
  • Independently determine proper combination haircuts on men and women utilizing all implements
  • Identify advanced haircutting tools
  • Demonstrate infection control principles and practices

CHEMICAL TEXTURE SERVICES

COSMO146

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5381 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Frederick, S. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 July 29, 2015 TW In-Person $75 10/20
5301 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Chiaro, L. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 July 22, 2015 MTW Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 6

Course Outcomes

  • Explain chemical actions that take place during permanent waving
  • Explain the difference between an alkaline wave and a true acid wave
  • Explain the purpose of neutralization in permanent waving
  • Describe how thio relaxers straighten the hair
  • Describe how hydroxide relaxers straighten the hair
  • Describe curl re-forming and what it is best used for
  • Compare the different kinds of advanced straightener’s

GENERAL SCIENCE OF HAIR COLORING

COSMO157

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53D1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Ganyon, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 Aug. 6, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 ThF In-Person $75 8/20

Credits: 6

Introduces the creative artistry of color through the study of color theory, the color wheel, basic color applications and techniques, and basic formulation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 116, 121, and 136.

Course Outcomes

  • List the reason why people color their hair
  • Explain how the hair’s porosity affects haircolor
  • Understand the types of melanin found in hair
  • Define and identify levels and their role in formulating haircolor
  • Identify primary, secondary and tertiary colors
  • Know what roles tone and intensity play in haircolor
  • List and describe the categories of haircolor
  • Explain the role of hydrogen peroxide in a haircolor formula
  • Explain the action of hair lighteners
  • List the four key questions to ask when formulating a haircolor
  • Understand why a patch test is useful in haircoloring
  • Define what a preliminary strand test is and why it is used
  • List and describe procedure for a virgin single-process haircoloring
  • Understand the two processes involved in double-process haircoloring
  • Describe the various forms of hair lightener
  • Understand the purpose and use of toners
  • Name and describe the three most commonly used methods for highlighting
  • Know how to properly cover gray hair
  • Know the rules of color correction
  • Know the safety precautions to follow during the haircolor process

LAB CLINIC I

COSMO161

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53G1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Ganyon, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#1 July 21, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TW In-Person $89 8/20

Credits: 6

Expand skills and knowledge by offering services to live models/clients in CPTC’s student clinic, a realistic salon environment. This course reinforces skills learned within the Cosmetology program and provides practice in advanced hairstyling and hair cutting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 112, 116, 121, and 136. .

Course Outcomes

  • Perform requested services on clients
  • Demonstrate all required skills of cosmetology
  • Practice cosmetology skills on other students and mannequins
  • Perform consultation and analysis procedures on clients
  • Build and recruit to maintain a clientele base
  • Demonstrate infection control principles and practices

LAB CLINIC II

COSMO162

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53H1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Klug, D. Bldg. 08, Rm. 100B July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TThF In-Person $89 7/20
5341 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Deleon, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 8, 2015 July 11, 2015 WThF Web-Enhanced $39 3/20

Credits: 8

Experience hands-on learning in a realistic salon setting. Fundamental and developing skills are reinforced and expanded as students provide services on live models/clients in CPTC’s cosmetology clinic. Effective client/student interaction will be practiced. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 161 and 157, or instructor approval. .

Course Outcomes

  • Perform requested services on clients
  • Demonstrate all required skills of cosmetology
  • Practice cosmetology skills on other students and mannequins
  • Perform consultation and analysis procedures on clients
  • Perform referral practices to maintain a clientele base
  • Demonstrate infection control principles and practices

LAB CLINIC III

COSMO171

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5391 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Frederick, S. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#2 July 2, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 ThF In-Person $89 10/20
5311 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Chiaro, L. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#1 July 8, 2015 Aug. 22, 2015 ThF Web-Enhanced $39 3/20

Credits: 8

Expand skills and knowledge by offering services to live models/clients in CPTC’s student clinic, a realistic salon environment. This course reinforces skills learned within the Cosmetology program and provides practice in advanced hairstyling and hair cutting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 112, 116, 121, and 136.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform requested services on clients
  • Demonstrate all required skills of cosmetology
  • Practice cosmetology skills on other students and mannequins
  • Demonstrate infection control principles and practices
  • Perform consultation analysis procedures on client
  • Build and recruit to maintain a clientele

COSMETOLOGY SALON BUSINESS PRACTICES

COSMO175

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53A1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Frederick, S. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 Aug. 4, 2015 Aug. 12, 2015 TW In-Person $75 10/20
5321 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Chiaro, L. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 July 27, 2015 Aug. 4, 2015 MTW Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 3

An introduction to the fundamental principles of manicuring and nail care. Topics include basic nail theory, nail disease and disorder, and anatomy of the hands. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 166.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify two options for going into business for yourself
  • Explain the responsibilities of a booth renter
  • List the basic factors to be considered when opening salon
  • Name the types of salon ownership
  • Identify the information that should be included in a business plan
  • Explain the importance of record keeping
  • Identify the elements of sucessful salon operations
  • Explain why selling services and products is a vital aspect of a salons

ARTIFICIAL HAIR

COSMO180

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53J1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Klug, D. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 Aug. 20, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 WTh In-Person $75 7/20
5351 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Deleon, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 1, 2015 July 6, 2015 WThF Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 1

Provides an overview of basic alternatives in artificial hair products and services. Students learn application and removal techniques and select appropriate forms of attachment to achieve intended outcomes. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 161 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • List and define terms as they relate to artificial hair
  • Identify human versus synthetic hair
  • Recognize and identify types of hair pieces
  • Apply and remove current hair extension practices

GENERAL SCIENCE OF NAILS

COSMO182

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53B1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Frederick, S. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 Aug. 11, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TW In-Person $75 10/20
5331 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Chiaro, L. Bldg. 08, Rm. 208 Aug. 5, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTW Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 4

Learn to work with the tools required for nail services and practice fundamental techniques for providing clients with a professional manicure and pedicure on natural nails. Develop skills in safety and sanitation associated with nail care. Topics include basic nail theory, nail disease, disorders and anatomy of the hands.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify the four types of nail implements and/or tools required to perform a manicure
  • Explain the difference between reusable and disposable implements
  • Describe the importance of hand washing in nail services
  • Explain why consultation is necessary each time a client has a service in the salon
  • Name the five basic nail shapes
  • List the types of massage movement most appropriate for a hand and arm massage
  • Explain the different between a basic manicure and a spa manicure
  • Name the correct cleaning and disinfection procedure for nail implements and tools
  • List steps in the post-service procedure
  • List steps in a manicure and pedicure

GENERAL SCIENCE OF SKIN

COSMO188

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53K1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Klug, D. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 Aug. 5, 2015 Aug. 20, 2015 WTh In-Person $75 7/20
5361 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Deleon, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 July 7, 2015 Aug. 17, 2015 MT Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 4

Provides an introduction to esthetic sciences. Applications in temporary hair removal, skin care, and cosmetic applications are presented. Histology and the recognition of disease and disorders of the skin will be emphasized. Infection control principles and practices will be applied. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 166 or instructor approval. .

Course Outcomes

  • List and define key terms associated with the study of skin
  • Recognize and illustrate the layers of skin and its functions
  • Recognize disease and disorders of the skin
  • Perform waxing and tweezing procedures while observing infection control practices and principles
  • Perform and record skin consultations
  • Perform appropriate facial application as determined by learner
  • List and recognize cosmetics used during make up applications
  • Apply and remove basic, special occasion and corrective make up procedures including eyelash enhancements

ADVANCED HAIR COLORING

COSMO225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53L1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Klug, D. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Aug. 5, 2015 WTh In-Person $75 7/20
5371 3 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Deleon, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. 207 Aug. 18, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MT Web-Enhanced $100 3/20

Credits: 7

Reinforce skills and learn the rational for advanced hair color techniques. Current trend applications as well as corrective techniques will be used. Students will determine and implement all aspects of hair coloring. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 157 and 161, or instructor approval. .

Course Outcomes

  • List and define terms and products utilized in professional hair coloring
  • Independently determine and demonstrate proper procedures for virgin and retouch services involving coloring, bleaching and highlighting applications
  • Independently formulate all types of color and bleaching mixtures
  • Perform preventive and corrective steps to avoid or solve hair coloring problems
  • Perform and design trend hair color applications
  • Demonstrate all necessary safety, infection control principles and practices

CLOVER PARK PRACTICAL PREPARATION

COSMO228

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53M1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Lind, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#4 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TWThF In-Person $75 6/20

Credits: 3

Prepares students to take the Washington State Cosmetology Practical Board Exam. Prerequisite: Successful completion of quarters 1- 4 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform all services required by the Washington State Cosmetology Practical Board Exam.

LAB CLINIC IV

COSMO230

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53N1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Lind, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#4 July 8, 2015 Aug. 21, 2015 WThF In-Person $89 6/20

Credits: 9

Hands-on learning experience in Cosmetology clinic. Reinforced skills and knowledge will be demonstrated through client and student interactions. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 170 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate client consultation as it pertains to requested service
  • Perform requested services interacting with clients
  • Apply acquired knowledge and techniques
  • Demonstrate Infection Control Principles and Practices

STATE BOARD WRITTEN TEST REVIEW

COSMO235

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53P1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Lind, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 July 7, 2015 Aug. 25, 2015 T In-Person $75 6/20

Credits: 4

Prepares student to take the Washington State Cosmetology Written Board Exam. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Quarters 1-4 or instructor approval

Course Outcomes

  • Define industry vocabulary as it pertains to cosmetology
  • Understand the Principles and Practices of Infection Control
  • Complete the Washington State Board of Cosmetology Written Exam

CAPSTONE

COSMO243

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53Q1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Lind, C. Bldg. 08, Rm. CL#4 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWThF In-Person $75 6/20

Credits: 6

Independently demonstrate knowledge and integration of cosmetology skills and concepts gained through the program. In this course students submit a cumulative portfolio that demonstrates achievement of the program’s student learning outcomes. Students may also participate in work experience opportunities that will round out their skills and prepare them for employment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of quarters 1-4 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of Cosmetology skills and concepts
  • Develop a Portfolio that demonstrates achievement of the program
  • Participate in work experience opportunities

INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP I

COSMO248

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53R1 Arranged Arranged Lind, C. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $89 0/20

Credits: 1

Provides on-the-job experience for students in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 33-hour course for students who want an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Participation in realistic on-the-job training

ADVANCED APPLICATION OF HAIRSTYLING

COSMO249

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53F1 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Ganyon, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 205 July 16, 2015 July 31, 2015 ThF In-Person $75 8/20

Credits: 4

Learn advanced hairstyling techniques to stay current with trends. Application of theory and procedures are combined to create specific looks. Infection control principles and practices are applied. Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 136.

Course Outcomes

  • Know theory of advanced hairstyling and current/seasonal trends
  • Independently demonstrate practical applications of advanced hairstyling and current/seasonal trends
  • Demonstrate three basic techniques of styling long hair
  • Perform basic braiding procedures
  • Demonstrate infection control principles and practices

INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP II

COSMO250

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53S1 Arranged Arranged Lind, C. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $89 0/20

Credits: 2

Provides on-the-job experience for students in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 66-hour course for students who want an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Participation in realistic on-the-job training

INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP III

COSMO252

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53T1 Arranged Arranged Lind, C. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $89 0/20

Credits: 3

Provides on-the-job experience for students in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 99-hour course for students who want an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Participation in realistic on-the-job training

INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP IV

COSMO254

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53U1 Arranged Arranged Lind, C. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $89 0/20

Credits: 4

Provides on-the-job experience for students in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 132-hour course for students who want an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Participation in realistic on-the-job training

INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP V

COSMO256

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
53V1 Arranged Arranged Lind, C. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $89 0/20

Credits: 5

Provides on-the-job experience for students in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 160-hour course for students who want an internship experience or who need additional hours meet the state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Participation in realistic on-the-job training

COOKING METHODS I

CUL 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3201 9:15 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 WThF In-Person $79.75 6/20

Credits: 7

Introduces students to the experience of preparing and cooking meals for restaurant service. Students will be given assignments and will rotate through restaurant stations throughout the quarter. Students will learn dishwashing and basic food preparation, to read and follow standardized recipes, deli operations, and station organization. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate basic cooking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

INTRODUCTION TO BAKING

CUL 113

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3231 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 July 6, 2015 Aug. 3, 2015 MT Web-Enhanced $100 13/26

Credits: 3

Introduces culinary students to the fundamentals of baking and to scientific principles. Students will learn different mixing and production methods in producing quick breads, pastries, cakes, pies, soufflés, mousses and custards.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Explain the basic principles and fundamentals of baking
  • Understand the basic principles of custards, puddings, cooked sugars, frozen desserts, soufflés, mousses and dessert sauces
  • Produce a variety of pies, tarts, including fruit, cream, chiffon and specialty items
  • Produce various types of cookies
  • Prepare the three basic meringue types
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce various restaurant desserts to a standard that is measured on taste, texture, flavor and appeal

PROFESSIONAL COOKING II

CUL 117

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3221 7 a.m. 9 a.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $100 13/26

Credits: 7

Covers the procedures and techniques of sauces and stocks. Students will learn how to prepare a variety of classic hot and cold sauces, use thickening agents properly, recognize and classify sauces, and prepare a variety of stocks.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate the correct techniques for a variety of cooking methods including roasting, grilling, sautéing, braising, stewing and steaming to prepare finished dishes to industry standard
  • Demonstrate the ability to thicken soups with various thickening agents
  • Prepare a consommé with appropriate garnish
  • Understand the structure and composition of meat

FOOD PREPARATION II

CUL 119

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3241 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 Aug. 4, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MT Web-Enhanced $100 13/26

Credits: 3

Provides practice in the fundamental techniques related to hot food cooking. Students will perform specific competencies to develop their proficiency in techniques and the science of cooking. Topics that will be covered are pasta, potatoes and grain cookery.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify the proper ways to make white & brown stocks per instructor demonstrations
  • Demonstrate and explain the preparation of clear, puree and cream based soups per instructor’s criteria
  • Display correct cooking procedures for a variety of dry, moist and combination cooking procedures

COOKING METHODS II

CUL 123

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3211 9:15 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 WThF In-Person $79.75 4/20

Credits: 7

Introduces the experience of preparing and cooking meals for restaurant service. Students will be given assignments and will rotate through restaurant stations throughout the quarter. They will be expected to practice a high level of previously learned competencies in knife skills, sanitation, proper handling and storage of product, and working under stringent time guidelines. Instructor permission required. Prerequisite: CUL 109.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate intermediate cooking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

COOKING METHODS III

CUL 139

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3251 9:15 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Massey, R. Bldg. 31, Rm. 100 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 WThF In-Person $100 4/20

Credits: 7

Introduces students to the experience of preparing and cooking meals for restaurant service. Students will be given assignments and will rotate through restaurant stations throughout the quarter. Students will be expected to practice a high level of previously learned competencies in knife skills, sanitation, proper handling and storage of product, and working under stringent time guidelines. Instructor permission required. Prerequisite: CUL 123

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate intermediate cooking techniques
  • Exhibit kitchen safety and sanitation practices
  • Prepare quality food according to specifications
  • Demonstrate positive work habits and the ability to work as a team member
  • Work quickly and efficiently

DENTAL SCIENCES II

DAS 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7781 12 p.m. 2 p.m. Carson-Lewandowski, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 109 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 TTh Hybrid $25 18/20

Credits: 5

Explores the general characteristics and uses of dental materials, and covers oral pathology conditions in the oral cavity. This course is also designed to provide the necessary information to accurately identify each of the body’s systems, functions, and how they interact with each other. The student will explore the structures of the head and oral cavity. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103-118 prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and describe abnormal oral conditions and ways to prevent transmission of these diseases or conditions in the dental office
  • Describe fundamentals of a cavity preparation, placement of a tofflemire and matrix band, and identify a variety of dental cements, their properties, uses, and proper manipulation
  • Demonstrate proper manipulation of various dental materials
  • Describe orally related conditions that affect the older patient
  • Describe the major medical disorders that can affect a patient's oral health
  • Describe the type of dental management a medically compromised patient would receive

DENTAL ASSISTING SKILLS II

DAS 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7791 12 p.m. 1 p.m. Carson-Lewandowski, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 109 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M Hybrid $25 18/20

Credits: 6

This course will introduce the student to advanced study model principles, coronal polish and fluoride treatments, advanced moisture control to include the application of rubber dams, intermediate charting, and dental instruments and hand pieces. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103-118 prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate proficiency in applying and removing rubber dams
  • Demonstrate proficiency in performing coronal polish and fluoride application
  • Demonstrate taking an accurate preliminary impression and pouring up and trimming a diagnostic cast
  • Accurately chart intraoral conditions for a patient utilizing the Universal Charting system at 100% accuracy
  • Identify the parts of a dental instrument and describe how instruments are identified
  • Identify the categories and functions of dental burs, instruments, and handpieces and describe when each would be utilized in a dental procedure
  • Demonstrate proficiency in changing dental burs in various dental handpieces in a timely manner

DENTAL SPECIALITIES I

DAS 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7701 1 p.m. 2 p.m. Wirth, R. Bldg. 21, Rm. 109 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W Hybrid $25 18/20

Credits: 3

Explores in depth the dental specialties of endodontics, orthodontics and periodontics. This course introduces the students to periodontal charting. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103–118 prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe various orthodontic procedures and identify the instruments associated with them
  • Describe the indications and contraindications for endodontic treatment and the sequence of endodontic procedures
  • List and recognize instrument used for endodontic procedures
  • Describe causes, signs, treatment, and instruments associated with diseases of the supporting structures of the teeth
  • Demonstrate proficiency at recording a periodontal chart at 100% accuracy

PRINCIPLES OF RADIOGRAPHY II

DAS 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
77A1 1 p.m. 3 p.m. Carson-Lewandowski, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 109 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $25 18/20

Credits: 5

Introduces students to intraoral and extraoral radiographic imaging, legal issues associated with radiography, and manual and automatic processing techniques. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103 – 118 prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the exposing of radiographs, types of x-ray film, care of dental film, and infection control in dental radiography
  • Demonstrate exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs
  • List and describe the advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography
  • Describe the components of informed consent with regard to dental imaging
  • Describe the Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act
  • Describe the components of a quality assurance program

CERTIFICATION REVIEW I

DAS 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
77B1 Arranged Arranged Carson-Lewandowski, D. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $237 18/20

Credits: 1

Prepares students to take the Infection Control Exam through the Dental Assistant National Board. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103–118 prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Take and pass the Infection Control exam for the Dental Assistant National Board

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II

DAS 239

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7711 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $14 5/20

Credits: 10

Provides Dental Assistant students with the opportunity to use the advanced skills and information acquired in DAS 103-237. Students will spend 270 hours rotating through a minimum of two private offices or dental clinics. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103 - 237, Infection Control certification, all college-level general education courses, and completion of the Radiation Health & Safety component prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Given the materials, lectures, videos, guided practice sessions and assessments, the performance objectives have been brought forward to the clinical experience courses and must be performed with at least 75% accuracy

ADVANCED THEORY

DAS 241

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7721 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $29.75 0/20

Credits: 5

This course will introduce the student to dental business administration procedures. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103–237, their Infection Control certification and the Radiation Health & Safety component prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.

Course Outcomes

  • Discuss oral and written communications and identify the differences between verbal and non-verbal communications
  • Describe and compare the handling of different types of phone conversations
  • Discuss the role of the office manager/business assistant in the dental office
  • Describe various types of filing systems to include the pros and cons of each
  • Describe the functions of computerized practice management systems and manual bookkeeping systems
  • Discuss the management of inventory systems
  • Discuss fiscal management as it applies to the dental office
  • Identify dental procedures and coding
  • Detail claim forms and describe the procedure and purpose of claim forms follow up

CERTIFICATION REVIEW III

DAS 243

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7731 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $237 6/20

Credits: 1

This course will prepare the student to take the final component of the Dental Assistant National Board exam, General Chairside. Upon successful completion of the exam and all Dental Assistant courses, the student will receive their Certified Dental Assistant credential and will be eligible for graduation. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete DAS 103–237, Infection Control certification, and their Radiation Health & Safety component prior to continuing in the Dental Assisting.

Course Outcomes

  • Take and pass the General Chairside exam for the Dental Assistant National Board

DENTAL TERMINOLOGY & PROCEDURES

DBOA 103

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7741 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $25 10/20

Credits: 4

Introduces information to correctly recognize and identify various occupations within the dental environment. Terminology necessary to complete all other courses. Information provided to accurately identify the names and numbers of teeth in the primary and permanent dentition. Students will complete the Washington State Dental Association (WSDA) HIV/AIDS course.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and recognize the duties and responsibilities of the various occupational roles within the dental field
  • Recognize and utilize basic dental terminology frequently used in the dental office
  • Research dental treatment procedures
  • Complete the Washington State Dental Association (WSDA) HIV/AIDS self-study Course

DENTAL CHARTING, SCHEDULING & RECALL MANAGEMENT

DBOA 111

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7751 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $25 15/20

Credits: 5

Explores dental charting symbols and treatment descriptions. Develop, decipher and present a comprehensive treatment plan. Covers the necessary information to accurately develop a patient recall system and maintain productive and effective patient scheduling. Students will have training and access 24 hours a day to the Dentrix Dental Software to learn and practice dental charting, scheduling & recall procedures. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: DBOA 103

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize, interpret and present various charting methods and symbols commonly used in the dental practice at 75% accuracy
  • Recognize dental terms, treatment procedures, and the cost and time involved in dental treatment at 75% accuracy
  • Demonstrate their ability to develop, decipher and present a treatment plan at 75% accuracy
  • Accurately demonstrate an understanding of the various ways of utilizing time units, dental staff abilities and patient needs to effectively schedule patient dental treatment at 75% accuracy
  • Develop an appointment matrix and schedule patients for appropriate treatment and appointments at 75% accuracy. These tasks will be completed manually and in the Dentrix Dental Practice Management software
  • Role play as a dental team member in a “morning huddle" classroom demonstration at 75% accuracy
  • Develop a patient recall system electronically using Dentrix at 80%
  • Identify the teeth and radiographic landmarks and mount radiographs at 90% accuracy

DENTAL CORRESPONDENCE & EMPLOYMENT SKILLS

DBOA 119

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7761 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $25 11/20

Credits: 4

Explores a wide variety of dental office forms and development of manual and computerized inventory filing systems. Organizational skills are the primary emphasis of this course. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: DBOA 103

Course Outcomes

  • Prepare records for filing, apply alphabetical indexing rules and demonstrate the rules of filing
  • List and explain various types of inventory systems and factors determining supply quantity
  • Construct supply orders for the clinical and business office areas of a dental practice
  • List the components and describe the function of a clinical record and explain the rules for data entry
  • Identify and categorize various types of records maintained in a dental office and distinguish between active and inactive records.

DENTRIX ADVANCED TRAINING

DBOA 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7771 Arranged Arranged Wirth, R. Online July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged Online $25 8/20

Credits: 2

Provides expanded Dentrix software skills to students with basic Dentrix Dental Software training and/or experience. Students will have training and access 24 hours a day to the software. Students will demonstrate setting up practice defaults in the Office Manager module, manage electronic charting in the Dentrix Dental Software, pursue dental insurance claims processing and payment posting processes, and explore and generate management reports. Prerequisite: DBOA 111 and/or industry experience with the Dentrix Dental Software.

Course Outcomes

  • Manage electronic charting in the Dentrix dental software
  • Pursue Dental Insurance claims processing and payment posting processes in the Dentrix software

DRAFTING II

DSN 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3601 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Houser, S. Bldg. 19, Rm. 210 Aug. 13, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/28

Credits: 5

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles needed to create an as-built plan set to include floor plan, power/ mechanical plan and elevation. Field surveys, symbols and graphics, and formatting of drawings will be introduced. Prerequisites: DSN 105.

Course Outcomes

  • Complete an as-built field measurement
  • Collaborate with fellow students
  • Identify examples of an as-built floor plan, power/mechanical plan and elevation from working drawings
  • Properly format working drawings
  • Draft graphic symbols for: floor plan markers for elevations
  • Draft graphic symbols for an electrical/mechanical plan
  • Draft an elevation
  • Identify an understanding of the basic building components
  • Have familiarity with the basic vocabulary of basic building components to enable the designer to facilitate the process
  • Complete projects to include: as-built floor plan, electrical/mechanical plan and elevation

MATERIALS, METHODS, & TECHNIQUES OF INTERIOR DESIGN

DSN 123

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3611 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Bowman, M. Bldg. 19, Rm. 210 July 1, 2015 July 15, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/28

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the fundamental design materials and applications for interior environments, including hard and resilient flooring, soft flooring, paint, wall coverings, cladding, acoustics, metal, plaster, glass and millwork. Students will also learn to visually present material selections in a professional manner.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify the proper carpet and quantity for an interior space and basic knowledge of oriental rugs
  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify the proper flooring material and quantity for an interior space
  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify the proper wallcovering and quantity for an interior space
  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify the proper paint and finish and quantity for an interior space
  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify drapery treatment and estimate for an interior space
  • Given lecture, handouts and exercises student will be able to specify upholstery and estimate for an interior space

LIGHTING

DSN 132

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3621 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Houser, S. Bldg. 19, Rm. 210 July 16, 2015 July 29, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/28

Credits: 5

This course introduces students to the fundamental skills and concepts of lighting design. It is an approach to quality lighting with a primary focus on the design process. Areas covered are: basic lighting, human factors, sustainability, products and design fundamentals.

Course Outcomes

  • Identity the general considerations for lighting solutions
  • Identify types of lighting sources
  • Identify CRI (Color Rendering Index) ratings of various light sources
  • Identify typical Kelvin temperatures for various light sources
  • Identify LRV (Light Reflectance Value) of colors and materials
  • Design lighting solutions for the home, using appropriate lighting fixtures
  • Use energy-efficient lighting design principles
  • Complete a lighting plan on a RCP (Reflected Ceiling Plan)
  • Complete switching solutions on a RCP (Reflected Ceiling Plan)
  • Calculate energy allowances for watts used in a space and complete a Lighting Schedule to include: tag, symbol, watts/fixture, quantity, total watts and notes and selection rationale

TEXTILES

DSN 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3631 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Bowman, M. Bldg. 19, Rm. 210 July 30, 2015 Aug. 12, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 5/28

Credits: 4

This course is a comprehensive study of the textile products available for use in residential interior design, with an emphasis on window treatments, upholstery, the proper selection of materials, and working with drapery and upholstery showrooms and workrooms.

Course Outcomes

  • Given lecture and book study student will be able to identify textile fibers
  • Given lecture and book study student will be able to identify fabric structure
  • Given lecture and book study student will understand various dyeing and printing techniques
  • Given lecture and book study student will understand various pattern weaves and finishes
  • Given lecture and demonstration student will assemble a swatch catalog showing identification, fabric content, construction, and proper application
  • Given field study student will understand the proper use of textile showrooms and workrooms

INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL INTERIOR DESIGN

DSN 204

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3641 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Houser, S. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 July 15, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/30

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to commercial interiors. Contents include areas of practice, ADA and code compliance, and commercial design case studies.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify areas of practice in commercial design
  • Utilize commercial/contract design magazines to become familiar with the commercial design world, including products, manufacturers, news-worthy projects, design and architectural firms and trends
  • Identify what makes different commercial interior spaces feel and function the way they do, and attract certain clientele/customers through a commercial space observation
  • Identify non-residential requirements in ICC/ANSI and ADAAG
  • Experience obstacles people in wheelchairs face within building interiors through a wheelchair exercise
  • Access resources for the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design
  • Utilize the ADA Standards for Accessible Design to identify some common barriers found in public buildings, as well as solutions to these problems
  • Access the 2009 International Building Code (IBC) for commercial building environments and identify the main areas used for Interior Designers
  • Recognize and identify building codes as they apply to interior environments

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN: AN OVERVIEW

DSN 215

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3681 Arranged Arranged Watts, J. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/28

Credits: 5

Explores the history and principles associated with green and sustainable design. This course uncovers how the built environment affects people and the natural environment, environmental movements throughout history, green building assessment methods and certification programs, and environmental responsibilities associated with the interior design profession. Prerequisites: Basic competency with computers and navigating the web.

CAD I

DSN 216

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3651 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Watts, J. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 16, 2015 Aug. 4, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/30

Credits: 5

Introduction to CAD (Computer Aided Drafting). The successful student will learn the basic functions and commands to produce drawings for interior design.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize and identify the different parts of the AutoCAD User Interface
  • Modify and save a workspace in AutoCAD
  • Set up a new drawing in AutoCAD
  • Set up layers in AutoCAD
  • Correctly use basic AutoCAD commands to create shapes and working drawings
  • Modify objects in AutoCAD
  • Add text and dimensions to an AutoCAD drawing
  • Plot an AutoCAD drawing.

SUSTAINABILITY FOR RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS

DSN 224

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3691 9 a.m. 11 a.m. Watts, J. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 10, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 F Web-Enhanced $25 0/28

Credits: 4

Examines sustainable approaches to the built environment including preservation, rehabilitation, restoration, and reconstruction. This course will also take a look at applying sustainable design elements to residential and a variety of commercial project types. Prerequisites: It is recommended to have completed or be concurrently enrolled in DSN 215 Sustainable Design: An Overview. Basic competency with computers and navigating the web.

DESIGN I

DSN 225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3661 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Houser, S. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 Aug. 5, 2015 Aug. 19, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/30

Credits: 5

Using provided programming information, students will be introduced to space planning for commercial interiors, including programming, design schematics, ADA standards for accessibility and code considerations. Prerequisites: DSN 216.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify elements of Design Programs and Building Shells
  • Use the bubble diagramming technique and circulation studies to quickly explore all the planning options of a given space planning problem
  • Develop a rough floor plan with consideration to plumbing, major spaces, circulation, basic room allocations and furniture and equipment
  • Comply with barrier-free design standards for commercial design
  • Comply with building code requirements for commercial design
  • Complete a student project collaboration review
  • Complete a full space plan utilizing stated objectives and standard drafting techniques

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES IN DESIGN

DSN 226

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
36A1 1 p.m. 2 p.m. Watts, J. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 2, 2015 July 30, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $25 0/28

Credits: 5

Introduces sustainable strategies for the integrated interior environment, including identifying materials, products, lighting systems, and building components that embody the principles of sustainability. Prerequisites: It is recommended to have completed or be concurrently enrolled in DSN 215 Sustainable Design: An Overview. Basic competency with computers and navigating the web.

SUSTAINABLE INTERIORS & THE INTEGRATED DESIGN PROCESS

DSN 229

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
36B1 1 p.m. 2 p.m. Watts, J. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 Aug. 4, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $25 0/28

Credits: 5

Covers the steps to design and present a green interior space. Students will learn more about the integrated design process, develop their own sustainable interior design, and present it in a professional manner in preparation for real-life sustainable design proposals. Prerequisites: Completed or concurrently enrolled in DSN 215, 224, 226. Basic competency with computers and navigating the web.

20TH CENTURY & CURRENT DESIGN PHILOSOPHIES & SIG

DSN 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3671 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Bowman, M. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 Aug. 20, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 7/30

Credits: 3

Includes the study of historically significant 20th- and 21st-century designers and architects, their philosophies, and the role of their significant historic works.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify some notable designers and architects of the 20th and 21st century
  • Research a designer’s life and identify his/her: individual style and methods, design philosophy, significant works and historic significance
  • Present findings in a PowerPoint presentation
  • Cite references using the APA Format

INDEPENDENT STUDY

DSN 265

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
36C1 Arranged Arranged Houser, S. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $0 0/20

Credits: 3

Explore or expand knowledge of interior design within an independent study format. With guidance and instructor approval, the student will select a meaningful project within an area of interest to strengthen their range of abilities. The student will fulfill several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation to the instructor. Prerequisites: Instructor Approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Given one-on-one discussion with the instructors within the sixth quarter of the Interior Design Program, the student will select an area of interest and project model that they would like to explore. The project model must be approved by the instructors and must be a valid and meaningful addition to the student’s representative work or skills in interior design. The project model may involve expansion of prior work or may involve a new topic of study. Examples of project models may include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Additional work on Residential Design Projects
  • Additional work on Commercial Design Projects
  • Alternative configuration, expansion of, or digitally imaged version of student portfolio
  • Additional research paper on interior design topics, issues, construction methods, conservation, color studies, historic preservation, etc
  • Additional internship experience as defined within the Internship Course Syllabus
  • Additional exploration of AutoCAD computer programs, systems design, space planning or other design specialty areas
  • Following approval of the project model, the student will complete a project agreement form (including project definition, schedule, objectives and assessment criteria) that will be signed by both the student and the instructors. The student will be responsible for fulfilling their goals on an independent study basis. At the conclusion of the project he/she will complete a self-assessment and will present the object model to the instructors for evaluation. The successful student must demonstrate the ability to follow his /her own written program and goals to produce a cohesive solution

INDEPENDENT STUDY

DSN 270

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
36D1 Arranged Arranged Bowman, M. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 4

Explore or expand knowledge of interior design within an independent study format. With guidance and instructor approval, students will select a meaningful project within an area of interest to strengthen their range of abilities. The student will fulfill several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course, where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation to the instructor. Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Given one-on-one discussion with the instructors within the sixth quarter of the Interior Design Program, the student will select an area of interest and project model that they would like to explore. The project model must be approved by the instructors and must be a valid and meaningful addition to the student’s representative work or skills in interior design. The project model may involve expansion of prior work or may involve a new topic of study. Examples of project models may include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Additional work on Residential Design Projects
  • Additional work on Commercial Design Projects
  • Alternative configuration, expansion of, or digitally imaged version of student portfolio
  • Additional research paper on interior design topics, issues, construction methods, conservation, color studies, historic preservation, etc
  • Additional internship experience as defined within the Internship Course Syllabus
  • Additional exploration of AutoCAD computer programs, systems design, space planning or other design specialty areas
  • Following approval of the project model, the student will complete a project agreement form (including project definition, schedule, objectives and assessment criteria) that will be signed by both the student and the instructors. The student will be responsible for fulfilling their goals on an independent study basis. At the conclusion of the project he/she will complete a self-assessment and will present the object model to the instructors for evaluation. The successful student must demonstrate the ability to follow his /her own written program and goals to produce a cohesive solution

INDEPENDENT STUDY

DSN 275

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
36F1 Arranged Arranged Watts, J. Bldg. 19, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Explore or expand knowledge of interior design within an independent study format. With guidance and instructor approval, the student will select a meaningful project within an area of interest to strengthen their range of abilities. The student will fulfill several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course, where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation to the instructor. Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Given one-on-one discussion with the instructors within the sixth quarter of the Interior Design Program, the student will select an area of interest and project model that they would like to explore. The project model must be approved by the instructors and must be a valid and meaningful addition to the student’s representative work or skills in interior design. The project model may involve expansion of prior work or may involve a new topic of study. Examples of project models may include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Additional work on Residential Design Projects
  • Additional work on Commercial Design Projects
  • Alternative configuration, expansion of, or digitally imaged version of student portfolio
  • Additional research paper on interior design topics, issues, construction methods, conservation, color studies, historic preservation, etc
  • Additional internship experience as defined within the Internship Course Syllabus
  • Additional exploration of AutoCAD computer programs, systems design, space planning or other design specialty areas
  • Following approval of the project model, the student will complete a project agreement form ( including project definition, schedule, objectives and assessment criteria) that will be signed by both the student and the instructors. The student will be responsible for fulfilling their goals on an independent study basis. At the conclusion of the project he/she will complete a self-assessment and will present the object model to the instructors for evaluation. The successful student must demonstrate the ability to follow his /her own written program and goals to produce a cohesive solution

NATURE AND THE OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

ECE 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4111 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Chase-Deitrich, D. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 9, 2015 Aug. 20, 2015 Th In-Person $3 13/20

Credits: 2

Gain skills and knowledge on the components of an outdoor classroom. Ways to incorporate creativity while supporting children as they explore nature in the environment will be included, as well as sustainable practices for young children.

Course Outcomes

  • Research benefits for children of being outdoors and negative effects of nature deprivation
  • Design areas that stimulate observation, creativity, exploration, manipulation and movement in children
  • Develop activities that focus on beauty and wonder in nature
  • Gain skills in utilizing strategies that encourage a child’s observation skill in nature
  • Select materials for outdoor learning centers and create a center
  • Evaluate an outdoor environment using an assessment tool
  • Introduce green practices that can be incorporated into children’s settings

ISSUES AND TRENDS GREEN

ECE 134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41B1 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $3 2/20

Credits: 2

Research topics that cover some of the current sustainable practices and trends in the ECE field.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Research topics in Early Childhood Education and sustainable practices
  • Apply knowledge of Early Childhood Education to research related to sustainable/green practices in the field
  • Write a research based paper and create a project to reflect the implementation of sustainable practices research on work in the field
  • Define and explain the relevance of Sustainable “green” Practice and how it can positively impact the field of early learning

SCHOOL AGE MATH, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY

ECE 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41M1 Arranged Arranged Kaasa, M. Online July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $28 3/20

Credits: 3

Explore the different aspects of the school age curriculum in science, math, and technology.

Course Outcomes

  • Examine and create activities that allow school age children to question, explore, make observations and reach conclusions
  • Analyze how to use children’s curiosity to design learning experiences, activities and materials that develop the skill of scientific inquiry and scientific disposition
  • Identify the mathematics concepts and skills that are appropriate for school age children
  • Design educational activities and materials for mathematics
  • Examine the use of appropriate science and mathematics software for school age children
  • Analyze criteria for the selection of appropriate software for school age children
  • Identify different media and technology (internet, DVD, CD, etc.) appropriate to use for school age children
  • Examine the integration of the multiple intelligences with math, science and technology concepts

ECE CURRICULUM: MATH

ECE 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41N1 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Lockhart, S. Bldg. 10, Rm. 205 July 8, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $3 6/20

Credits: 2

Explore the different aspects of early childhood curriculum in mathematics.

Course Outcomes

  • List & apply the principles of math in an early childhood environment
  • Describe the role of the early childhood teacher in teaching math to children
  • Research & list appropriate sources for Infant/Toddler and Preschool children’s math curriculum
  • List math developmental skills
  • Identify and create developmentally appropriate activities in math
  • Design developmentally appropriate learning centers that support math experiences
  • Learn about appropriate math software for children

PRACTICUM 4: GREEN

ECE 190

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41C1 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $3 0/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for practical field experience with a sustainable practices or “green” specialization. Includes a seminar component.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior
  • Maintain successful employment, or volunteer at an instructor approved school or early learning program
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in the area of specialization – “Green” (sustainable practices)

PRACTICUM 4: THE EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT CHILD

ECE 194

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41D1 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 1/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for practical field experience with an emotional intelligence specialization. Includes a seminar component.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior
  • Maintain successful employment, or volunteer at an instructor approved school or early learning program
  • Objective 3: Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in the area of specialization – Emotional Intelligence

PRACTICUM 4: WORKING WITH FAMILIES

ECE 198

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41F1 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 2/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for practical field experience with a working with families specialization. Includes a seminar component.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior
  • Maintain successful employment, or volunteer at an instructor approved school or early learning program
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in the area of specialization – working with families

BASIC CHILD CARE TRAINING (STARS)

ECED&100

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41K1 6 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Holland-O'Hern, C. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $3 2/20
41H1 Arranged Arranged Havens, A. Online July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $28 1/20

Credits: 3

Designed to meet licensing requirements for early learning teachers and family home child care providers, the STARS 30-hour basics course is recognized in the MERIT system. Topics include child growth/development, cultural competency, community resources, guidance, heath/safety/nutrition and professional practice.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify ways to create partnerships and provide resources for all families
  • Observe and describe developmental characteristics and behaviors of infants, toddlers, preschoolers and young children
  • Plan for learning through play and active involvement for children in care programs
  • Demonstrate techniques for keeping children healthy and safe in preparing food, hand washing, diapering/toileting, cleaning, managing medication, preventing accidents, and identifying incidences of child abuse of neglect
  • Describe techniques for meeting the nutritional and exercise needs of young children
  • Identify appropriate guidance techniques
  • Relate how the Washington Administrative Code governs child care programs and support staff in safely caring for children
  • List examples of professional practice in Early Childhood Education

INFANTS & TODDLERS - NURTURING CARE

ECED&132

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4101 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Beisley, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 205 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T Web-Enhanced $28 8/20

Credits: 5

Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers and culturally relevant care.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe developmental milestones from birth to 36 months articulating the influences of individual development, temperament, and cultural norms
  • Develop a plan to create reciprocal, culturally sensitive partnerships with families
  • Describe infant/toddler child care regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition & safety
  • Describe guidance techniques that are appropriate and effective with infants and toddlers
  • Create and critique infant & toddler learning environments
  • Construct a plan for developmentally appropriate culturally relevant curriculum that supports language, physical, cognitive, creative, social and emotional development
  • Identify resources supporting infant/toddler programs and infant/toddler specialists

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

ECED&160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41J1 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Havens, A. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W Hybrid $28 12/20

Credits: 5

Investigate learning theory, program planning, and tools for curriculum development promoting language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills and growth in young children.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain major early childhood curriculum theories and current trends such as theme-based, emergent, inquiry based, integrated and project approach
  • Use a variety of resources, including Washington State Guidelines, program standards, and National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Developmentally Appropriate Practice principles to plan curriculum
  • Create curriculum which supports children’s language/communication, cognitive, social/emotional, fine/gross motor and creative development
  • Plan developmentally appropriate activities and schedules which promote child growth and learning
  • Observe, document and assess individual and group needs, interests and skills for the purpose of curriculum planning and on-going modifications of plans

PRACTICUM III

ECS 183

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4121 4 p.m. 5 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 5/20

Credits: 5

Provides the student with practical field experience. Students will work at community child care centers or the Hayes Child Development Center on the Lakewood campus, allowing them to apply classroom study to on-the-job situations. Includes a scheduled seminar.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate work place behavior
  • Maintain successful employment
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate understanding of the learning environment for children

PRACTICUM IV INFANTS AND TODDLERS

ECS 217

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4141 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 1/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for practical field experience with specialization in infants and toddlers.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior
  • Maintain successful employment or volunteer in an infant/toddler center
  • Apply transferable skills in the workplace
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in the area of specialization – infant and toddler development

SCHOOL AGE ENVIRONMENT

ECS 225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41L1 Arranged Arranged Kaasa, M. Online July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $28 5/20

Credits: 2

Focuses on the environment suitable for the development of school-age children.

Course Outcomes

  • Learn how to set up an enriching learning environment for school age children
  • Learn how to set up stationary verses transient environments
  • Create spaces that encourage learning through play
  • Create spaces that encourage multiculturalism and family
  • Learn how to observe and assess the school age environment by using the school-age environment rating scale

PRACTICUM IV SCHOOL AGE

ECS 230

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4151 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 1/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for practical field experience with school-age specialization.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior
  • Maintain successful employment, or volunteer a t a school age center
  • Apply transferable skills in the workplace
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in the area of specialization- school age development

ISSUES AND TRENDS IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION

ECS 235

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4161 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $3 1/20

Credits: 2

Research that covers some of the current issues and trends in the ECE field.

PRACTICUM IV - LEADERSHIP

ECS 286

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4171 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 2/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for a practical field experience with a leadership specialization. Includes a seminar component and observations. There is a focus on emotional intelligence and conducting meetings.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate work place behavior
  • Maintain successful employment or volunteer at a center
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in area of specialization-leadership

PRACTICUM IV - CHILD DEVELOPMENT

ECS 287

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4181 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 0/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for a practical field experience with a preschool specialization. Includes a seminar component and observations.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate work place behavior
  • Maintain successful employment or volunteer at a center
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in area of specialization-child development

PRACTICUM IV - FAMILY CHILDCARE PROFESSIONAL

ECS 288

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4191 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 2/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for a practical field experience with a family childcare specialization. Includes a seminar component and observations.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate work place behavior
  • Maintain successful employment or volunteer at a center
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in area of specialization-family child care

MENTORING IN ECE

ECS 290

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4131 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 205 Aug. 6, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th In-Person $3 7/20

Credits: 1

Learn fundamental skills needed for early childhood mentors who practice as trainers and coaches. Covers concepts of adult learning, communication, observation, feedback, and conflict resolution. Also offered online.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe “phase” and “stage” theories of adult development and how they relate to adult learning
  • Describe the developmental stages of early childhood teachers and the effects to mentoring relationships and the needs of protégés
  • Indicate the stages in mentoring relationships and the role of self-awareness and respect for differences
  • Identify a variety of communication skills, modeling practices, and conflict resolution techniques
  • Conduct an observation and conferencing process utilizing tools of self- assessment and constructive feedback
  • Define and describe the skills and methods involved in planning, facilitating and implementing an adult learning session

THEORIES OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT

ECS 292

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41G1 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Felch, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M Web-Enhanced $28 7/20

Credits: 3

Exploration of child development theories and their application to the education of young children. .

Course Outcomes

  • Identify and list main components of John Dewey’s theory
  • Identify and list main Domains and indicators of Washington State Guidelines for Child Development
  • Identify and list main components of Erikson’s theory and its application to ECE
  • List Piaget’s stages of Cognitive Development and their application to ECE
  • Identify and list the main components of Vygotsky’s theory
  • Research other theorists and practitioners and current best practice models of development application

ECE PRACTICUM IV: SPECIAL NEEDS

ECS 297

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
41A1 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Colombini, L. Bldg. 10, Rm. 111 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $17 0/20

Credits: 3

Provides the student with the opportunity for a practical field experience with specialization in special needs. Includes a seminar component.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate work place behavior
  • Maintain successful employment or volunteer at a center
  • Apply transferable skills in the work place
  • Demonstrate appropriate practices in area of specialization-special needs

AC/DC: BASIC THEORY, FRACTIONS & OHM’S LAW

EFS 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5801 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 5/20

Credits: 7

Introduces basic theory of electricity, electrical measurements of circuits, fractions, Ohm’s law, decimals, and decimal fractions. Formulas in electrical work, positive and negative numbers, exponents, powers of ten, and solving Ohm’s law. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of chapter one and end of chapter test, the student will be able to explain the basic theory of electricity, electrical measurements, and circuits
  • Upon the completion of chapter two and the end of the chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to do fractions, ohms law, decimals, decimal fractions, and the metric system
  • Upon the completion of chapter three and the end of the chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to do formulas, positive and negative numbers, formulas with exponents, units of measurements in electronics, solving the ohms law formulas for current, voltage and resistance
  • Upon the completion of chapter four and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to calculate and solve for voltage, resistance and current in a series circuit

AC/DC ELECTRICITY: SERIES PARALLEL & COMBINATION CIRCUITS

EFS 106

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5811 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 5/20

Credits: 7

Introduces the student to voltage, current, resistance, total values, and control of current in a series circuit. Introduction to parallel circuits, current and resistance, and voltage in a parallel circuit. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: EFS 105, or instructor’s permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of chapter five and the end of the chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to calculate total current, total resistance and total voltage in a parallel circuit
  • Upon the completion of chapter six and at the end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to solve parallel series circuits, series parallel circuits, line drop and electrical distribution systems
  • Upon the completion of chapter seven and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to solve for power in a simple circuit, combine un-like terms, total power in an electrical circuit, solve the power formula for current or voltage, and solve exponential power formulas
  • Upon the completion of chapter eight and the end of the chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to combine like terms, combine unlike terms, solve algebraic equations, solve equations by transposition and cross multiplication, and combine unlike involving signed numbers

AC/DC ELECTRICITY: ELECTRICAL & POWER APPLICATIONS

EFS 107

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5821 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 5/20

Credits: 7

Introduces electric power in electric circuits, solving the power formula for current and voltage. Algebra for complex electric circuits. Resistance of wire of different sizes and length, sizing wire for a given load. Instantaneous values, maximum values and phase angles of an AC sine wave. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: EFS 106, or instructor’s permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of chapter eleven and at the end of chapter test, the student will be able to solve for percentages, evaluate conversion factors for electrical and mechanical power, find efficiency of electronic components, determine input and output of electrical devices, load matching and power transfer
  • Upon the completion of chapter twelve and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to solve ratios and proportions, learn the American Wire Gage Table (AWG), resistance of wire of different materials, resistance of wire of different lengths, resistance of wire of different cross sectional area, and resistance of wire of any diameter, any length, or any material
  • Upon the completion of chapter thirteen and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to determine the maximum current carrying capacity of wires, find the maximum size of wire to a given load. Calculate the correct size of wire to prevent excessive voltage drop
  • Upon the completion of chapter fourteen and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to explain and perform basic trigonometric functions of a right triangle and find the length of sides of a right triangle
  • Upon the completion of chapter fifteen and end of chapter test, the student will demonstrate the ability to make and explain graphs, the generation of an AC voltage, instantaneous values, maximum values, phase angles of an AC sine wave, effective values of an AC sine wave, measuring an AC sine wave, vectors and phase’s and the Pythagorean theorems and power

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE PRINT READING

EFS 108

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5831 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 1/20

Credits: 7

Introduces the student to practical print reading as it applies to the National Electrical Code. Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of each chapter of the NEC Print reading book, the student will demonstrate the ability to read prints as they apply to the National Electrical Code

NATIONAL ALARM INSTALLER TRAINING PROGRAM

EFS 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5841 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 1/20

Credits: 7

Introduces the student to basic alarm by completing the comprehensive lessons, viewing video, and completing lesson tests. With final test, the student will have a thorough exposure to alarm systems. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will describe basic alarm systems and components.
  • Getting started: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will explain the three units of electricity, voltage, current and resistance, and basic Ohm’s Law formula
  • Relays: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will describe relays, their operation, and uses in alarm systems
  • Protective Circuits: Upon completion of the reading assignments, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will explain voltage sources, intrusion detectors, connecting wiring, current indicators, protective loops, and end of line devices
  • Using a volt meter: Upon completion of the reading assignments, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of the lesson test, the student will demonstrate the use of volt ohm meters and their uses in the alarm industry
  • Installations tools: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will demonstrate the proper respect for tools, different types of screwdrivers and their proper use, special purpose screwdrivers and common hand tools used in the alarm industry
  • Installation and wiring: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will explain the installation and wiring alarm systems in residential and commercial buildings, home running wiring, junction boxes, backbone or spine wiring, multi-conductor cables, wiring between floors of a building, concealing magnetic contacts, end of line resistors, and tamper switches

CCTV APPLICATION & DESIGN

EFS 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5851 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 1/20

Credits: 7

Introduces the student to basics of CCTV systems design and applications. Through individual lessons, the student will be exposed to the basics of CCTV systems design and applications. Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Video Theory: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will describe CCTV system and its components
  • Cameras & Lighting: Introduction: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test the student will explain camera sensitivity, definition of CCD explanation and attributes, advantage of the chip camera over the tube type camera, CCD chip definition and description, dummy cameras, common rules of thumb and spectral response charts
  • Lenses: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson tests, the student will describe lenses consideration and choices, color camera lenses, focal length, field of view, depth of field, zoom lenses, cs style cameras and lenses, IRIS and F stop explanation, 2X tele-converters, and lenses terminology
  • Industrial time-lapse video recorders: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will demonstrate industrial recorders versus consumer VCR’s, video recording and playback , time-lapse procedures, location and environment, audio recording with time-lapse, event recording, and options
  • Housings & bracket: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will select camera housings and camera mounting brackets
  • Video motion detectors: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test the student will explain video motion detection used and digital computer interfaced motion detection
  • Video Theory: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will describe CCTV system and its components

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODES

EFS 118

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5861 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 7/20

Credits: 6

Introduces National Electrical Codes. Through individual tests, the student will be able to research applicable electrical codes. Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon completion of NEC test the student will demonstrate the ability to use the computer and National Electrical Code for windows by query, search for a single word, search for more than one code with logical operators, search for exact phrase, search by section and tables, link tables, charts and exceptions together, insert bookmarks and highlight applicable text and references. All questions must be referenced to the appropriate NEC article and sub-paragraph

NATIONAL FIRE CODES

EFS 119

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5871 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 7/20

Credits: 6

Introduces the National Fire Codes. Through individual tests, the student will be able to research applicable fire codes. Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon completion of NFPA test the student will use the computer and National Fire Code for windows by query, search for a single word, search for more than one code with logical operators, search for exact phrase, search by section and tables, link tables, charts and exceptions together, insert bookmarks and highlight applicable text and references. All questions must be referenced to the appropriate NFPA article and sub-paragraph

CCTV FIELD SERVICE & INSTALLATION

EFS 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5881 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 7/20

Credits: 7

Introduces basic systems service and installation of CCTV systems. Through individual lessons, the student will be exposed to the basics of CCTV field service and installation. Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Video Theory: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson test, the student will demonstrate the use of a CCTV system and its components
  • Camera Theory: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the video accompanying tape and completing the end of section test, the student will explain camera tube and CCD comparisons, CCD explanations and attributes, CCD chip definitions, descriptions and common rules of thumb concerning cameras
  • Lenses: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completing the end of lesson tests, the students will explain lenses, consideration and choices, color camera lenses, focal length, field of view, depth of field, zoom lenses, CS style cameras and lenses, IRIS and F stop explanation, 2X tele-converters and lenses terminology
  • Protective Circuits: Lenses selection tools: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completion of the end of the lesson test, the student explain lenses selection, lenses slide rule focal length, field of view, illumination guide, lenses selection wheel and lenses view finder
  • Monitors: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completion of the end of lesson test, the student will demonstrate the application and size of monitors, location and layout, operator fatigue and monitor terminology
  • Housings & bracket: Upon completion of the reading assignment, viewing the accompanying video tape and completion of the end of lesson test, the student will demonstrate how to select camera housings and camera mounting brackets

WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE CODES

EFS 124

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5891 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 7/20

Credits: 2

Introduces the student to the Washington Administrative Codes pertaining to industrial safety and to electrical installations in the state of Washington. Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Upon completion of Washington Administrative Code test the student will describe the WAC as applied to the electrical trade. All questions must be referenced to the appropriate WAC article
  • Upon completion of WAC RCW 19.28, WAC296-46 and WAC 296-401A the student will explain the WAC Codes applicable to the Low Voltage Industry

ADDRESSABLE FIRE SLC SYSTEMS/DESIGN

EFS 207

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58A1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 0/20

Credits: 7

Introduces Addressable and Intelligent Fire Alarm Systems using Signaling Line Circuits (SLC). Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, and hands-on practical application and design. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the 78-Credit Hour Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security Certificate, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of an Addressable Fire Alarm System
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of an Intelligent Fire Alarm System
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of a Signaling Line Circuit as used with a Fire Alarm System
  • Demonstrate by practical application the Installation, Design and Service of Addressable Fire Alarm Systems

BIOMETRICS ACCESS

EFS 211

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58B1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 0/20

Credits: 7

Introduces biometrics access control. Various biometrics systems are explored, as well as computer programmed access-control systems. Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, as well as hands-on practical application, installation and design. Prerequisites: EFS 207 or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of various Biometric Systems as well as their application
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of the computer programming of various Access Systems
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of networking of various Access Systems

ADVANCED VOICE EVACUATION FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS

EFS 216

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58C1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 0/20

Credits: 7

Introduces Advanced Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm Systems as used in high-rise applications. Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, and hands-on practical application, installation, and design. Prerequisites: EFS 211 or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of a Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm System
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of Initiating Devises and Zoning Application of High Rise Installations
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of a Notification Devices and Voice Evacuation of High Rise Applications
  • Demonstrate by practical application the Installation, Design and Service of Voice Evacuation Fire Alarm Systems and interconnections to Building controls such as elevator recall

FIRE CODES, NICET, NFPA

EFS 221

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58D1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 3/20

Credits: 7

Introduces Fire Codes, AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction), NICET (National Institute for Certification of Engineering Technologies), and NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). Includes comprehensive lessons; lecture; and hands-on practical application, installation, and design. Prerequisites: EFS 216 or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of National and Local Fire Codes
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, Including Acceptance testing and required periodic Inspections
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of the Requirements of the National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technology
  • Demonstrate by practical application the National Fire Protective Association NFPA 72

HIGH SECURITY STRUCTURED CABLING

EFS 226

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58F1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 3/20

Credits: 7

Introduces High Security Structured Cabling in residential and commercial applications. Explores cabling as a total package. Includes most applications of security and low voltage needs. Includes comprehensive lessons; lecture; and hands-on practical application, installation, and design. Prerequisites: EFS 221 or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of various applications of High Security Structure Cabling
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of the Cable types and uses
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of NEC Code requirement for proper Installation of various cables
  • Demonstrate proper trouble shooting techniques on Structured wiring

CCTV DIGITAL NETWORK SOLUTIONS

EFS 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
58G1 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Gordon, J. Bldg. 14, Rm. 213 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $5 3/20

Credits: 7

Introduces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Digital Network Solutions. Explores applications that require the camera to be recorded and viewed digitally and or remotely via various networks. Includes comprehensive lessons; lecture; and hands-on practical application, installation, and design. Prerequisites: EFS 226, or instructor’s permission. Instructor permission required.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of various applications of Digital Recording
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of the Various Networking Solutions of CCTV
  • Identify terms and concepts and demonstrate an understanding of Micro Applications using CCTV

BASIC READING AND WRITING

ENG 082

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W35 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 12/21
5W36 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Heath, T. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 6/25

Credits: 5

Introduces and develops basic reading and writing skills. Focus is on writing proper sentences and sound paragraphs that express a main idea clearly and fully with a minimum of errors in sentence structure, punctuation and spelling. Coursework emphasizes writing from observation as well as writing in response to reading. Helps refine reading comprehension and increase vocabulary for college-level reading requirements. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP placement score.

Note: The 5W40 and 5W42 sections of Basic Reading and Writing are part of College Success through Basic Reading and Writing, which are linked with COLL 101 2P22 and 2P32, respectively. Placed into English 082? Want to be a part of an active, social and engaging class? In this 7-credit Learning Community you will practice using time management, note taking and study skills while working on your English sentence structure, punctuation and spelling.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify, label, and explain the different parts of speech
  • Write using correct sentence structure, grammar, and punctuation
  • Construct a simple paragraph which clearly expresses a main idea
  • Increase vocabulary skills through reading and writing
  • Implement successful test-taking strategies
  • Use Canvas/technology to communicate and take tests

ADVANCED READING AND WRITING

ENG 094

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W42 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Schwarder, C. South Hill Campus Room 107 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $25 1/25
5W41 Arranged Arranged Martindale, K. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 13/25
5W40 1:50 p.m. 2:45 p.m. Martindale, K. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 4/25
5W38 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Schwarder, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 9/20
5W37 9:10 a.m. 10:05 a.m. Schwarder, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 20/25
5W39 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Martindale, K. Bldg. 16, Rm. 205 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 6/25

Credits: 5

Enhances writing ability with emphasis on organization, unity, coherence and adequate development of short essays. Introduction to various types of paragraphs and essays and review of the rules and conventions of standard written English. Both paper and electronic communication tools will be used. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP placement score or successful completion of ENG 82.

Course Outcomes

  • Use a variety of skills and strategies to understand readings
  • Write clear, organized short essays which demonstrate organization, paragraph unity and coherence/clarity, sentence variety, and effective sentence structure
  • Understand the appropriate methods for incorporating other’s words and ideas into their own work

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

ENGL&101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0544 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Quincy, D. Bldg. 14, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 21/25
0548 Arranged Arranged Martindale, K. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 25/25
0543 9:10 a.m. 10:05 a.m. Heath, T. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 15/25
0542 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Heath, T. Bldg. 14, Rm. 104 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 9/25
0547 Arranged Arranged Martindale, K. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 21/25
0546 Arranged Arranged Heath, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 9/25
0545 6:30 p.m. 9 p.m. Quincy, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 113 July 2, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $25 8/25

Credits: 5

Introduction to expository writing where emphasis is placed upon unified, coherent essays. Learn to generate essays that support a thesis and to use the rhetorical modes of development (narration, description, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, persuasion) appropriately. Recognize writing as a process and use secondary MLA/ APA documentation styles to support critical thinking and writing. Prerequisite: COMPASS score of 77 in writing and 86 in reading. Placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.

Note: Sections 0556 and 0557 are part of the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP). Click here to learn more about ALP.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize writing as a process and effectively use processes of prewriting, drafting, rewriting, and editing in his or her work
  • Work in a collaborative community where critical analysis of writing, both professional and novice, is promoted as a means of cognitive and social development
  • State a purpose and develop it by using a variety of supports, including but not limited to, definition, illustration, description, cause and effect, and persuasion
  • Express ideas with clarity and specificity
  • Distinguish between central and supporting ideas
  • Demonstrate an awareness of audience, sensitivity to language, and competence in handling conventional, and some unconventional, grammatical, punctuation, and spelling rules
  • Use MLA or APA documentation to support a critical analysis of purpose and detailed bibliographic research
  • Use computer technology in the discovery process of critical research and to enhance essay presentation
  • Employ effective information literacy techniques in public speaking

HAZARDOUS WASTESITE OPERATIONS

ENV 134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4511 9:15 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Smith, K. Bldg. 16, Rm. 102 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $4.75 9/16
4501 9:15 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Smith, K. Bldg. 16, Rm. 102 July 1, 2015 July 28, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $4.75 17/16

Credits: 7

Training provided in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.120 HAZWOPER Standard and WAC 296-843-20010. Training includes theory and application of incident management/command structures, response operation, toxicology, and planning, in addition to statutory requirements.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Given lecture, demonstration and practicum students shall be able to properly and adequately perform initial and continuing site evaluation. 100% minimum standard is required on all practical exams
  • Given lecture, demonstration and practicum student shall properly select and use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). 100% minimum standard is required on all practical exams
  • Given lecture, demonstration and practicum student shall define and perform his/her appropriate role as set in applicable health and safety regulations. 100% minimum standard is required on all practical exams

INTERNSHIP

ENV 240

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4551 Arranged Arranged Fritz, A. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $0 2/20

Credits: 10

All students finishing the program are required to complete an internship. This is a temporary full-time position in the public or private sector where the student gains confidence and experience in a chosen area of employment. Students experience on-the-job opportunities as well as making a skilled contribution to the internship provider. Opportunities to find internships are provided, but the student is in charge of finding his or her own internship. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 4th-quarter courses, or instructor permission. Enrollment in ENV 246, Environmental Science Capstone required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Obtain an internship, sending both a resume and cover letter to them, using the telephone and having a personal interview
  • Perform internship of approximately 300 hours, both giving assistance and receiving educational instruction from the provider

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CAPSTONE

ENV 246

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4561 Arranged Arranged Smith, K. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 2

This course accompanies ENV 240 Internship. The Capstone Project integrates the CPTC core abilities with the internship and identification of how the core abilities apply in the workforce. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 4th-quarter courses, or instructor permission. Enrollment in ENV 240, Internship required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Explain how each of the CPTC Core Abilities (Communication, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Information/Technological Literacy, and Personal/Professional Responsibility) is demonstrated in the individual’s internship experience
  • Identify skills learned in program coursework and how they are implemented in the internship experience
  • Identify skills learned during the internship not covered in program courses
  • Reflect how the internship process enhances the learning process and helps prepare one for employment

ENVIRONMENTAL CRITICAL AREAS

ENV 251

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4531 9:15 a.m. 3 p.m. Fritz, A. Bldg. 16, Rm. 104 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 19, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 15/20
4521 9:15 a.m. 3 p.m. Fritz, A. Bldg. 16, Rm. 104 July 15, 2015 July 31, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 11/20

Credits: 7

Environmental critical areas, including wetlands, wildlife conservation areas, aquifer recharge areas, flood hazard and landslide areas are covered. Focus is on wetland delineation and reporting. Appropriate sections of federal, state and local regulations are addressed. Field trips to local sites. Delineation project on the campus wetland. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify five critical areas as described in Pierce County development regulations title 18E on written exams with 80%
  • Identify/define wetland types, function and value on written exams with 80% accuracy
  • In field laboratory setting identify 30 common wetland vegetation species with 80% accuracy
  • Perform wetland delineation at the intermediate level and write an analysis
  • report summarizing data collected

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY FOR ESTHETICIANS

ES 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62K1 7:30 a.m. 8:25 a.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 2

A comprehensive survey of the body systems and how they work as they relate to the practice of esthetics. Class projects include eukaryotic cell, cranial puzzle, muscles of the head and neck, and muscle flash cards.

Course Outcomes

  • Correctly draw and label a eukaryotic cell
  • Design a cranial puzzle of the facial skeleton and cranial bones
  • Create a model of the head and neck and identify 30 muscles without errors
  • Identify all body systems without errors
  • Explain homeostasis and negative feedback loop of the human body
  • Explain how knowledge of body systems informs all esthetic services
  • Understand how knowledge of anatomy and physiology helps estheticians practice safely and recognize contraindications for salon services

HISTOLOGY & PHYSIOLOGY OF THE SKIN

ES 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62L1 8:30 a.m. 9:25 a.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 3

A comprehensive examination of the epidermis, dermis and hypocutis, including specialty cells and dermal adnexa. Examination of the physiology of the epidermal basement membrane, accessory organs of skin and epidermal differentiation as they relate to the practice of esthetics.

Course Outcomes

  • Design and build a vertical cross-section of skin, including depth of UVR, hairy and hairless skin, desquamation model, and hair follicles
  • Recognize and name micro-domains of skin
  • Recognize and explain physiology of skin domains
  • Classify specialty cell functions of epidermis and dermis
  • Explain terminal differentiation as it relates to homeostasis and the negative feedback loop
  • Distinguish between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and explains how they impact each domain of skin
  • Accurately describe the source of biochemicals of the natural moisturizing factor and detail its function

INTRODUCTION TO COSMETIC CHEMISTRY

ES 113

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62M1 9:30 a.m. 10:25 a.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 3

Fundamentals of chemistry, including differences between organic and inorganic matter, simple chemical reactions, pH for estheticians, and composition of, as well as indications for, commonly used products for esthetic salon services.

Course Outcomes

  • Test common skin care products and evaluate their pH for compatibility with epidermis
  • Identify characteristics of: solutions, suspensions, and emulsions, and state uniqueness of each
  • Explain surfactant molecules accurately and draw one
  • Describe surface tension and how laundry is cleaned using surfactants
  • Articulate and write how skin pH is undermined by alkaline/base ingredients and how those ingredients are also used to facilitate extraction services without detriment to barrier functions
  • Explain tyrosinase inhibition
  • Explain transepidermal water loss and perturbations of epidermal barrier function remedied by occlusive formulations
  • Accurately decipher a skin care formulation back label
  • Research every ingredient in skin formulation with at least 10 ingredients

CHARTING AND MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR ESTHETICIAN

ES 116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62N1 10:30 a.m. 11:25 a.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 4/20

Credits: 4

Survey of common medical charting notations and terminology employed in medical practice, particularly as it relates to spa, salon, and medical office environments.

Course Outcomes

  • Decipher 50 common medical chart notation abbreviations
  • Summarize purposes of HIPPA laws and describe when they apply to esthetic services and various office procedures
  • Complete workbook and flashcards for medical terminology and identify dermatological procedures using proper terms
  • Pronounce medical terms correctly

SKIN DISEASES & Disorder

ES 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62P1 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 5

Identify normal skin and anomalies of skin, including primary, secondary, and vascular lesions, as well as irregularities of skin pigmentation. Identification of skin diseases and differentiate them from common noncontagious lesions is included.

Course Outcomes

  • Create and maintain a compendium of all skin lesions listed in Milady’s textbook for use in industry and state board examination study
  • Recognize common skin lesions and which contraindicate salon services
  • Explain histopathology of basal, squamous, and malignant melanoma
  • Identify grades of acne

BACTERIOLOGY, SAFETY AND SANITATION

ES 123

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62Q1 1 p.m. 2 p.m. Shields, M. Bldg. 02, Rm. 123 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 4

Overview of pathological and non-pathological microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, endo and ecto parasites, disease vectors and transmission. Levels of decontaminations pertaining to salon, spa and medical office venues.

Course Outcomes

  • Conduct online research of Material Safety Data Sheets, download and explain it
  • Distinguish between Decontamination Levels I and II
  • Explain diseases transmission common to salon services
  • Differentiate between Hepatitis A, B, and C and their viability outside the human body
  • Explain the difference between a self-limiting virus and bacterial infection
  • Understand salon safety and sanitation practices as they pertain to Washington state WAC 308-20-110
  • Differentiate between Herpes Simplex types I and II, and Herpes Zoster, and other skin infections that contraindicate salon services

FACIAL PROCEDURES I

ES 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62C1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 10/20

Credits: 4

Introduction to facial procedures, including client intake and assessment, skin analysis, clinical indications and contraindications, European facial instruction, product selections and recommendations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisite: ES126, ES130, ES132, ES134, ES137.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform European facial manipulations
  • Assess clinical indications as revealed by skin analysis
  • Provide appropriate product recommendations for treatment objectives and home-based care

TEMPORARY HAIR REMOVAL

ES 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62D1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 10/20

Credits: 5

Survey of temporary hair removal, including contraindications, methods of epilation and safety and sanitation employed in the esthetics profession. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisites: ES125, ES130, ES132, ES134, ES137

MAKEUP APPLICATION

ES 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62F1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 10/20

Credits: 2

Course includes color theory and basic makeup application techniques. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisite: ES125,ES126, ES132, ES134, ES137.

Course Outcomes

  • Use of proper tools for successful makeup application
  • Safety and sanitation protocols for makeup application
  • Employ color theory and concepts to achieve desired application

SKIN CARE AND BODY TREATMENTS

ES 132

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62G1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 10/20

Credits: 4

Body treatments to include mud wraps, body scrubs, wet and dry room techniques including back treatments, and cellulite body treatments. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisite: ES125, ES126, ES130, ES134, ES137.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform proper treatment assessment and draping
  • Proper product selections and use
  • Utilize correct equipment safely

MACHINE FACIALS

ES 134

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62H1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 10/20

Credits: 4

Includes indications, contraindications and safety for electrical modalities including galvanic, high frequency, and microcurrent. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisite: ES125, ES126, ES130, ES132, ES137.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform proper treatment assessment and application of machine facials
  • Employ all safety and sanitation protocols for machine-based facials

MICRODERMABRASION AND SUPERFICIAL PEELS

ES 136

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6241 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 12/20

Credits: 4

Clinical exfoliationtechniques employing chemical and mechanical methods. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all first-quarter Esthetic courses. Co-requisite: ES140, ES143, ES159, ES146, ES152.

Course Outcomes

  • Effectively operate and manage each clinical position
  • Coordinate clinical activities with other students, teamwork
  • Work cooperatively with other students and clients, strengthen practitioner skills

SPA/CLINIC OPERATIONS

ES 137

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62J1 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Errigo, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 319 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 10/20

Credits: 1

Realistic training in our student-run clinic incorporating point of sale, dispensary, laundry, spa and clinical operations and management positions. Co-requisites: ES125, ES126, ES130, ES130, ES134.

CLINICAL APPLICATIONS I

ES 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6201 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 11/20

Credits: 7

Realistic training in our student-run clinic incorporating every aspect of an exemplar esthetics practice. Co-requisites: ES143, ES159, ES146, ES136, ES152.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform clinic applications at an entry level esthetic practice

CLINICAL APPLICATIONS II

ES 143

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6211 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 12/20

Credits: 7

Realistic training in our student-run clinic incorporating every aspect of an exemplar esthetics practice and advanced modalities.

CORRECTIVE CONCEALING MAKEUP

ES 146

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6231 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $64 11/20

Credits: 1

Theory and application of corrective and concealing techniques for makeup applications Co-requisites: ES140, ES143, ES159, ES136, ES152

Course Outcomes

  • Safely and sanitarily apply concealing makeup as appropriate for existing clinical conditions
  • Skillfully apply concealing makeup as appropriate for existing clinical presentations

LASER THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

ES 148

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6261 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 1/20

Credits: 7

Didactic applications of multiple laser modalities. Course will include all related safety and first aid components. Co-requisites: ES150, ES154, ES156, ES157, ES158

Course Outcomes

  • Define and discuss multiple laser applications including all clinical concepts
  • Hands on applications of multiple laser services for all clinical concepts if desired by student at outside facilities
  • Differentiate different laser platforms and the wavelength use

MEDIUM DEPTH PEELS

ES 150

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6271 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 1/20

Credits: 2

Didacticapplications of clinical-based medium depth peels. Course includes all related safety and first aid measures. Co-requisites: ES140, ES143, ES159, ES136, ES152

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate safe and effective application processes for all medium depth peels
  • Differentiate each chemical component and layer of the epidermis or dermis that is affected

PHARMACOLOGY FOR ESTHETICIANS

ES 152

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6251 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 12/20

Credits: 1

This course includes common medications and drug interactions as they pertain to esthetic skin-care services. Co-requisites: ES140, ES143, ES159, ES136, ES146.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify common medications and drugs that interact and effect treatments

ADVANCED SKIN CARE AND MASSAGE TECHNIQUES

ES 154

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6281 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 1/20

Credits: 6

This course includes advanced modalities of skin care including MLD and other industry-related techniques. Co-requisites: ES148, ES150, ES156, ES157, ES158.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify applicable modality for specific clinical indications
  • Perform various modalities as indicated for specific clinical applications

ADVANCED COSMETIC CHEMISTRY

ES 156

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6291 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $0 1/20

Credits: 3

In-depth study of cosmetic chemicals, product knowledge and how to review a medical study. Research papers produced consisting of chemical products, ingredients and contraindications that may occur during an esthetic treatment. Co-requisites: ES148, ES150, ES154, ES157, ES158.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify chemical ingredients in products
  • Describe the components of a medical study
  • Research products and develop/deliver a presentation of advanced cosmetic chemical components

ADVANCED COSMETIC CHEMISTRY

ES 157

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62A1 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 1/20

Credits: 2

Independent research and preparation of a business plan and portfolio as capstone project. Co-requisites: ES148, ES150, ES154, ES156, ES158.

Course Outcomes

  • Create and present a complete business plan appropriate for submission to a bank, spa or medical clinic owner
  • Create and present a portfolio incorporating client treatment plan from inception to completion including photos and documentation of progressive treatments

STATE BOARD PREPARATION

ES 158

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
62B1 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Siedlicki, M. Bldg. 08, Rm. 327 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $0 1/20

Credits: 2

This course includes kit preparation and simulation of state board examinations. Co-requisites: ES148, ES150, ES154, ES156, ES157.

Course Outcomes

  • Comply with existing State of Washington Department of Licensing examination requirements

INTRO TO BUSINESS PLAN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ES 159

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6221 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Sorensen, K. Bldg. 08, Rm. 325 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $50 11/20

Credits: 1

Introduction to independent research and preparation of a business plan and portfolio as capstone project. Co-requisites: ES140, ES143, ES146, ES136, ES152

Course Outcomes

  • Online research of area demographics
  • Outline startup costs for opening a business

WORKSHOP SAFETY

FSME 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ01 7:30 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Staff Bldg. 03, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 3

Covers occupational safety and health for workers in manufacturing and engineering workshop environments. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Discuss applicable safety laws and regulations including Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) safety standards
  • Identify the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) appropriate for typical manufacturing tasks
  • Explain OSHA safety rules concerning PPE for eye protection
  • Explain OSHA safety rules concerning PPE for hearing protection
  • Identify hazardous energy sources in a typical workshop environment
  • Demonstrate lockouUtagout procedures
  • Explain when a machine or a process should be stopped to investigate or correct a hazard
  • Interpret information resources such as MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets)
  • Demonstrate how to safely identify, handle, store, monitor and measure hazardous materials
  • Describe the safety procedures required in an electrical lab environment
  • Demonstrate electrostatic discharge (ESD) safety procedures
  • Identify potential causes of fire in the work environment
  • Describe the appropriate course of action for dealing with different types of fires
  • Demonstrate the correct use of fire-fighting equipment
  • Describe means of escape and evacuation
  • Explain how to size up a load, and identify hazards before carrying a load
  • Describe precautions for carrying things on stairways
  • Demonstrate the steps necessary to lift and put down a load safely
  • Describe incident reporting procedures in a typical workshop environment

QUALITY PRINCIPLES, INSPECTION AND TEST

FSME 111

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ11 7:30 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Staff Bldg. 03, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Provides students with a foundational set of measurement, data analysis, and documentation skills. Teaches students how to interpret manufacturing drawings and schematics, how to take measurements and analyze data, and introduces quality principles and terminology used in industry. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the philosophy of, and the terms associated with Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, and ISO 9001
  • Demonstrate the ability to create clear and accurate QA documentation using office software (e.g. Word,Excel)
  • Demonstrate the use of precision steel rulers
  • Demonstrate the use of micrometers
  • Demonstrate the use of vernier calipers
  • Demonstrate the use of dial calipers
  • Demonstrate the use of depth micrometers
  • Demonstrate the use of inside micrometers
  • Demonstrate the use of a height gauge
  • Select appropriate measurement and/or inspection equipment for common manufacturing processes
  • Set up and inspect parts using surface plates, angle plates, sine bars and plates, and V blocks
  • Document measurements and observations by filling out quality charts and records
  • Use technical vocabulary to discuss measuring protocols, sampling and testing procedures and reporting
  • Communicate issues with hand sketches
  • Use a spreadsheet (e.g. Excel) to record, analyze, and present data
  • Calculate the mean, median, mode and standard deviation for a set of experimental results
  • Identify object lines, hidden lines, center lines, extension lines, dimension lines, and projection lines
  • Identify line combinations
  • Identify 3-view drawing, view arrangement, 2-view drawing, 1-view drawing
  • Identify size dimension, location dimension, cylinder dimension, circular dimension, and arc dimension
  • Identify size dimensions for holes and angles
  • Identify location dimensions for points, centers, and holes
  • Identify large arc dimensioning and baseline dimensions
  • Identify detail and assembly drawings
  • Identify cutting planes (full sections and section lining)
  • Identify half-sections (partial sections and full section assembly drawings)
  • Interpret orthographic projection drawings
  • Interpret oblique and isometric drawings
  • Interpret geometric dimensioning and tolerancing information from printed and CAD drawings
  • Explain the information presented in title blocks, general notes, revision blocks, abbreviations, parts lists, drawing references, numbering systems, and other technical information
  • Identify, using correct vocabulary, the tools, and materials and machining processes as stated on a blueprint
  • Describe the shape and location of each feature of an object in all views of a machine drawing
  • Extract geometric and other data from printed schematics and drawings, including the use of sectional and auxiliary views
  • Extract geometric and other data from 2D and 3D CAD files

FABRICATION FUNDAMENTALS 1

FSME 112

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ21 7:30 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Staff Bldg. 03, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Teaches students the basic workshop skills needed to fabricate parts and structures. Also introduces students to the properties of common materials used in manufacturing and engineering. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate best practices for maintaining a clean and safe workshop environment
  • Prepare a work area to do layout and fabrication
  • Select appropriate tools for common manufacturing tasks
  • Operate hand and power tools safely and effectively
  • Demonstrate acceptable methods for hand cutting and forming sheet metal
  • Demonstrate acceptable methods of drilling and countersinking
  • Demonstrate acceptable methods of riveting
  • Demonstrate acceptable methods using a break & shear
  • Demonstrate acceptable methods using abrasive tools
  • Explain how to maintain hand and power tools for effective use and longevity
  • Use math to make equipment adjustments/calibrations and to complete fabrication projects
  • Identify the major classes of materials used in manufacturing and engineering including metals, plastics, and composites
  • Define bulk material properties such as elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity
  • Identify how metal alloys have differing properties and are suited to different uses
  • Describe common failure mechanisms for metals, plastics, and composites
  • Utilize online and offline reference sources to determine the properties of commonly-used engineering materials
  • Choose appropriate materials to be used in the manufacture of typical parts or structures

FABRICATION FUNDAMENTALS 2

FSME 113

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ31 7:30 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Staff Bldg. 03, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 0/20

Credits: 5

Introduces students to more advanced manufacturing and engineering fabrication techniques including welding, the use of machine tools, composites, and electrical wiring. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain the basic theory behind welding
  • Explain the difference between MIG, TIG and Oxy/Acetylene welding
  • Describe the differences between various types of welds
  • Interpret welding symbols used on blueprints and schematics
  • Prepare a work area for a welding project
  • Safely set up welding equipment
  • Prepare metal for welding procedures using proper joint design and joint preparation techniques
  • Construct a part or structure by welding
  • Discuss methods for testing the strength of welds
  • Identify and characterize the materials used in the manufacturing of composite parts and structures
  • Identify uses and hazards involved in handling common composite supplies
  • Prepare a work area for a composites project
  • Demonstrate safe handling techniques for composite materials, adhesives, solvents, etc
  • Construct a composites part
  • Discuss methods for testing composite parts and structures
  • Identify symptoms/causes of delamination
  • Identify tools used for the repair of composite parts
  • Define and describe voltage, current, resistance, power and energy
  • Explain the difference between alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC)
  • Explain the theoretical concepts of soldering
  • Make electrical connections for power circuits
  • Demonstrate the use of appropriate grounding techniques
  • Use a digital multimeter and electrical schematics to troubleshoot problems in electrical circuits
  • Demonstrate electrostatic discharge (ESD) safety procedures.
  • Describe the construction of printed circuit boards (PCBs)
  • Identify and discuss the different soldering techniques and arrangements for through-hole and surface mount components
  • Demonstrate acceptable soldering techniques
  • Demonstrate acceptable de-soldering techniques
  • Demonstrate rework and repair techniques
  • Identify the components of an engine lathe
  • Calculate cutting speeds and feeds for a variety of materials
  • Explain the safety procedures that apply to machine tools
  • Identify machine accessories
  • Set up basic lathe operations
  • Perform metal removing operations such as turning, facing, drilling, grooving, turning between centers, and threading
  • Perform basic machine maintenance

GPS TECHNOLOGIES

GEO 215

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4541 9:15 a.m. 3 p.m. Fritz, A. Bldg. 16, Rm. 104 Aug. 24, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 13/20

Credits: 2

Use global positioning system equipment to create maps and to create files for use in ArcGIS (geographic information system). Focuses on Trimble GPS technologies. Analysis tools and layout features for map creation are covered.

DIGITAL IMAGING II

GTC 149

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8901 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Condon, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 154 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $54.75 13/20

Credits: 5

Builds on the fundamentals of Photoshop and introduces advanced imagery to include blending, advanced layers, advanced selections, vector tools, filters and tonal correction. Prerequisite: GTC 133 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Through lecture, demonstration, hands-on projects and reading assignments, the successful student
  • will: use image editing, masking, color correction, the creation and management of layers
  • and channels to manipulate images
  • Competencies will be demonstrated by completing written tests with a minimum average of 70 percent accuracy, projects with an minimum average grade of C

PREPRESS I

GTC 164

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8911 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Condon, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 154 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th In-Person $54.75 13/20

Credits: 5

Students will create, edit, and manipulate PDF files. Combine files into portfolios, and secure PDF documents. They will also work with many of the advanced features of Adobe Acrobat, including OCR text recognition, pre-flight, print production tasks, touch up, commenting, proofing, and live collaboration.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Through reading assignments, lectures and demonstrations the student will use prepress equipment
  • and skills to produce negatives, stripp flats, impose books, proof jobs, and make plates
  • Competencies will be demonstrated by completing; written tests with a minimum average of 70
  • percent accuracy, projects with an minimum average grade of C

INTRO TO VECTOR-BASED ILLUSTRATION SOFTWARE

GTC 169

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8921 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Owens, D. Bldg. 11, Rm. 158 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $54.75 13/20

Credits: 5

Vector-based software, tools and features will be used to create text and logos, apply image effects and design web graphics. The course incorporates branding and identifiers when designing products and enables students to design for both print and web.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify interface and tools, using the Pen, Rectangle, Selection, Direct Selection tools
  • Create vector-based images for use in upcoming projects, such as Ads or Flyers
  • Select, identify, and color objects using the Color, Swatch, Gradient, Fill and Stroke panels
  • Draw basic shapes in conjunction with the Ellipse, Polygon, Rectangle and Star tools
  • Draw and modify paths and points using the Direct Selection tool
  • Align and Distribute objects, via Horizontal Right, Center, Left. Vertically Align, or Distribute Bottom, Center and Top
  • Create symmetrical patterns
  • Create and blend paths
  • Attach or place objects and text into paths

INDESIGN I

GTC 174

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8931 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Owens, D. Bldg. 11, Rm. 158 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $54.75 13/20

Credits: 5

Perform techniques of the application on the Macintosh computer. Create files for electronic output, create documents using color and color separations for creating ads, brochures, menus and other documents. Explore PDF files, EPS files and production work. Prerequisite: GTC 143 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Given assigned reading and lecture, the student will study and produce style sheets (paragraph and character) for complex forms, and documents, apply terms, vocabulary, concepts, and techniques that will maintain style, continuity and format throughout and concepts pertaining specifically to these documents and the various software and hardware used in producing these documents
  • Given assigned reading and lecture, the student will examine and produce a menu, a newsletter design or complex tabular material and apply techniques that will maintain style, continuity and format throughout with the use of tabs, tables or both elements
  • Given assigned reading and lecture, the student will demonstrate knowledge of proofing and explain the various steps associated with proofing and customer changes using customer relations and techniques to resolve situations that arise in regard to changes, extra charges, miscommunications and deadlines. Projects involving timed test with quick reproduction and font recognition will be created

PREFLIGHT

GTC 203

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8941 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Owens, D. Bldg. 11, Rm. 158 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th In-Person $54.75 11/20

Credits: 5

Explore the prepress environment using page layout, vector object-oriented and imaging software applications. Creating projects in color for collect for output and packaging of files. Perform electronic and laser separations for digital output. Prerequisites: GTC 223, GTC 276 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify the steps necessary to produce projects and a flow chart of the production process, specific to Print and Web
  • Apply terms, verbage, concepts, techniques that pertain specifically to design and production processes ie. Designer/CSR/Prepress Operator
  • Identify and use the correct high-quality images for print; explain the various steps associated with the use of these images for high-quality output
  • Demonstrate knowledge of file formats, file transfer methods, the different types of printing; explain the various steps associated with Collect for Output /Packaging files, color separations, Postscript, EPS and PDF files for output to a Service Provider
  • Demostrate typography and proofreading skills and apply as it relates to the customer correction cycle

ADVANCED PAGE LAYOUT PRINCIPLES

GTC 225

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8951 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Owens, D. Bldg. 11, Rm. 158 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $50 11/20

Credits: 5

Apply page advanced layout techniques using industry-standard software to produce files for output. Preflight and package press-ready files. Output composite and separations to postscript. Impose jobs for output service provider. Prerequisite: GTC 276,209,164 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Produce Preflight and Packaged press-ready files using page layout software. Must provide and produce Mockup/Dummy for all projects. Booklets, and compact disk covers
  • Create a Package design project from Mockup to Production Flat
  • using a Dieline
  • Repurpose and Prepare an Interactive page layout document based on an original print layout file. Must show proficiency in file format changes
  • Objective 4 Demonstrate a basic knowledge of proofreading skills, customer relations and interaction skill sets

CAPSTONE CLASS

GTC 254

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8961 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Moyer, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 154 July 6, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 M In-Person $54.75 11/20

Credits: 5

Preparation of personal job hunting package of student’s chosen specialty within the graphic technologies program, including industry research, business cards, cover letters, envelopes, resumes, personal sales pitches, and portfolios. Prerequisites: GTC 223, GTC 243 or instructor approval.

Course Outcomes

  • Using acquired skills and knowledge, lectures and demonstrations the student will use prepress
  • equipment and skills to produce a well-organized Job skills portfolio to include; resume' , cover
  • letter, archived capstone projects
  • Research job opportunities. Demonstrate quality control, professional work habits, troubleshooting techniques
  • Competencies will be demonstrated by completion of Portfolio demonstrating competency of graphic technologies skills

PAPER, PRICING, AND ESTIMATING

GTC 264

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8971 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Moyer, J. Bldg. 11, Rm. 154 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $54.75 11/20

Credits: 5

Explore paper production, paper quality choices and cost within the printing industry. Estimate both materials and time for various printing processes.

Course Outcomes

  • Using acquired skills and knowledge, lectures and demonstrations the student will categorize paper by weight, texture, and surface characteristics
  • Explore paper pricing. Match job quality to paper choices
  • Impose jobs according to final size and run size
  • Estimate production cost and overall value of common printing jobs
  • Competencies will be demonstrated by completing assignments with an minimum average grade of C

BASIC ELECTRICITY

HAC 102

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1801 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 5

Discusses the structure of matter, movement, electrons, conductors, insulators, direct and alternating current, and electrical units of measurement. The electrical circuit will also be studied along with electrical measurements, Ohm’s law, series and parallel circuits, and electrical power. Magnetic fields, inductance, transformers, capacitance, impedance, sine waves, and using electrical measuring instruments are also included.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain and define the basic concepts of current, voltage, resistance and power as applied to direct and alternating current and be able to take electrical measurements using meters and apply Ohm’s law and the power formula
  • Recognize AC and DC series, parallel and combination circuits and understand their implications on voltage, amperage, resistance and wattage
  • Recognize basic AC and DC circuit components, their symbols as used in electrical diagrams/schematics and describe their functions
  • Explain the basic concepts of magnetism and electromagnetism to include their effects in electrical circuits, generators, power supplies and basic motors
  • Demonstrate safe work practices in the classroom and lab using personal protective equipment and appropriate safety procedures
  • Identify electrical conductors and their proper applications to include the proper methods and materials to make wire connections and terminations
  • Build simple electrical circuits using an electrical diagram and be able to identify electrical short circuits and open circuits
  • Document newly learned skills

ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS

HAC 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1811 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 4

Discusses types of automatic control devices that respond to thermal change, the bimetal device, control by fluid expansion, the thermocouple, and electronic sensing devices. Covers space temperature controls (both high and low voltage), sensing temperatures of solids, pressure-sensing devices, oil-pressure safety controls, air-pressure controls, devices that control fluid flow, and maintenance of mechanical and electromechanical controls.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize the types of basic automatic controls and their components
  • Recognize and understand the functions and operation of devices responding to thermal changes and fluid expansion to include bimetal devices, mercury switches, thermocouples and electronic temperature sensing devices
  • Explain the application and maintenance of low voltage and line voltage temperature controls, pressure sensing devices and controls, transducers, gas pressure switches, regulators, mechanical and electromechanical controls
  • Install and demonstrate switches, a light and receptacles including three-way/four-way switches
  • Demonstrate safe work practices in the classroom and lab to include lockout/tagout procedures, recognizing hazardous locations and application of electrical safety requirements
  • Install a two station signaling circuit and do a complete circuit analysis of the installation
  • Use a circuit tracer to locate the Over Current Protective Device for that circuit
  • Correctly identify and install a plug on a cord
  • Complete a solder connection using proper soldering technique
  • Demonstrate professionalism with good work habits, good attendance and good communication

ADVANCED CONTROLS AND TROUBLESHOOTING

HAC 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1821 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 4

Control terminology, applications, and electronic control circuits are covered. Pneumatic controls and direct digital controls are also explored, along with programmable thermostats. Also covers procedures for troubleshooting basic and complex circuits, thermostats, and high-voltage circuits controlled by thermostats. Describes procedures for measuring amperage and voltage in low-voltage circuits and discusses pictorial and line diagrams.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize the types of advanced automatic controls/control systems and their components
  • Recognize and understand the functions and operation of advanced automatic controls/control systems to include pneumatic controls, direct digital controls (DDC’s). and program logic controllers (PLC’s)
  • Demonstrate the ability to read and interpret ladder diagrams as related to DDC/PLC control system
  • Write ladder programs to demonstrate common PLC logic functions
  • Demonstrate safe work practices in the classroom and lab to include recognizing potentially hazardous situations and applying appropriate electrical safety procedures/practices
  • Demonstrate through written examination your ability to successfully troubleshoot PLC systems
  • Explain and be able to successfully troubleshoot simple and complex circuits to include thermostats, various types of switches and loads using electrical meters and pictorial and line diagrams
  • Demonstrate professionalism with good work habits, good attendance and good communication

SIEMENS CONTROLS

HAC 160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1851 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 2

Serves as an introduction to the concepts of direct digital controls (DDC training). The course is a generic approach to understanding DDC terminology, the fundamentals of today’s new building control systems, how they work, features, and troubleshooting. Improve your control of HVAC systems, fire, security, access, control, lighting, and energy management.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize Siemens controls and components and understand their operation
  • Explain the many and varied applications for Siemens controls in the HVAC/R and building systems environment
  • Explain the unique installation requirements for Siemens controls as they apply to the HVAC/R and building systems environment
  • Define typical troubleshooting logic and techniques for Siemens controls as they apply to the HVAC/R and building systems environment
  • Demonstrate professionalism with good attendance and good communication

ELECTRIC MOTORS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

HAC 162

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1831 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 4

Types of electric motors are discussed, along with starting and running components and characteristics, motor speeds, and power supplies. Specific topics also included are single and split phase motors, the centrifugal switch, electronic replay, capacitor start motors, capacitor run motors, permanent split capacitor motors, shaded pole motors, single phase hermetic motors, positive temperature coefficient motors, and variable speed motors. Discussions will take place pertaining to various characteristics and insulations, bearings, mountings, and motor drives.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize the types and characteristics of single and three phase motors and as well as their components, component functions and their proper electrical connection
  • Recognize and understand the functions and operation of various motor starting devices to include start windings, centrifugal switches, current relays, potential relays, PTC’s, shaded poles, and start & run capacitors
  • Explain the application and cooling of motors in the HVAC/R trade, especially special motors such as hermetic motors, two-speed and variable speed motors, converters, invertors, electronically commutated motors (ECM’s), power supplies
  • Demonstrate safe work practices in the classroom and lab to include recognizing potentially hazardous situations and applying appropriate electrical safety procedures/practices
  • Inspect and install A/C and D/C rotating equipment
  • Demonstrate professionalism with good work habits, good attendance and good communication

ELECTRIC MOTORS & TROUBLESHOOTING

HAC 164

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1841 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 2/20

Credits: 3

Discusses mechanical and electrical motor troubleshooting. This includes drive assemblies, belt tension, pulley alignment, open and shorted windings, shorts to ground, capacitor problems, wiring and connectors, and troubleshooting hermetic motors.

Course Outcomes

  • Create an electrical ladder diagram and wiring diagram for each motor control circuit that is constructed
  • Build a two-wire control circuit for a single-phase motor
  • Build a three-wire control circuit for a single-phase motor
  • Demonstrate safe work practices needed for installation and troubleshooting of motor controls and control circuits
  • Build an on-delay motor control circuit
  • Build an on-delay/off-delay motor control circuit for two single-phase motors
  • Troubleshoot four basic motor control circuits

GREEN AWARENESS

HAC 167

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1861 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Anderson, R. Bldg. 25, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 3/20

Credits: 3

When it comes to HVAC/R electrical, “green” means maximizing the energy efficiency of existing equipment, specifying the most efficient systems available for the application and the available budget using renewable and sustainable fuel sources, and conserving water. Those items will be discussed along with the core knowledge of energy management and analysis, green heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration, electrical generation and consumption, and “green” plumbing.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand Energy Management and Audits
  • Understand Renewable and Sustainable Energy
  • Discuss Solar and Wind Energy
  • Discuss "Green" Plumbing
  • Discuss our Carbon Footprint
  • Learn Heat Load Calculations
  • Discuss the various agencies involved with "Green Awareness"

HEATING I

HAC 170

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1871 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Mcghee, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 18/40

Credits: 7

This course covers controls, thermal physics, electrical, and equipment for residential and light commercial heating system installation and servicing with emphasis on electric and gas heating. Co-requisite: HAC 170, 175, 181, and 183. Prerequisite: HAC 102 - 167. .

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate through class participation and written examinations, a basic knowledge and understanding of both LP and natural gas heating systems
  • This will include, but not be limited to, the ability to identify the components of a gas heating system, explain how they function as well as define in detail the electrical systems and operation of a typical gas heating system
  • Demonstrate through use of computer simulators, the ability to troubleshoot and “repair” faults for both LP and natural gas heating systems
  • Through Skills Checks associated with technical videos, demonstrate the ability to work as a team member to develop team answers to questions regarding gas heating principles and systems. Through class participation, state and explain such answers
  • Realize the importance demanded in the industry of taking personal responsibility for an appropriate attendance/tardy record
  • Demonstrate through class participation and written examinations, an entry knowledge and understanding of basic safety practices

HEATING I LAB

HAC 175

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1881 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Pearce, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 300 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $24.75 18/40

Credits: 5

Will teach students to competently troubleshoot and repair electric heat and gas-burning appliances. Also covers thermal physics and equipment for heating-system analysis and efficiency. This is a hands-on class using live projects. Prerequisite: Must have required hand tools of the trade and be enrolled in Heating I.

Course Outcomes

  • Check a thermocouple for proper millivolt reading
  • Change a thermocouple
  • Check a gas valve for proper milivolt output
  • Change a gas valve
  • Check an electronic spark module for proper operation
  • Remove, clean and reinstall burners. Check burners for proper operation
  • Adjust gas pressure on a furnace
  • Check rollout and all other safety controls
  • Demonstrate the proper threading of black iron pipe
  • Demonstrate the proper assembly of threaded pipe fittings
  • Demonstrate the proper technique of silver brazing
  • Demonstrate reliability and commitment through consistent attendance and performance

HEATING II

HAC 181

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1891 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Mcghee, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 402 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $45 18/40

Credits: 6

This course covers controls, thermal physics, and equipment for residential and light commercial heating system installation and servicing with emphasis on oil and hydronic heating. Prerequisite: Must have required hand tools of the trade and be enrolled in Heating I. .

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate through class participation and written examinations, a basic knowledge and understanding of electric, oil, and hydronic heating systems. This will include, but not be limited to, the ability to identify the components of a such heating systems, explain how they function as well as define in detail the electrical systems and operation of a typical electric, oil or hydronic heating systems
  • Demonstrate through use of computer simulators, the ability to troubleshoot and “repair” faults for oil heating systems
  • Through Skills Checks associated with technical videos, demonstrate the ability to work as a team member to develop team answers to questions regarding electric, oil and hydronic heating principles and systems. Through class participation, state and explain such answers
  • Realize the importance demanded in the industry of taking personal responsibility for an appropriate attendance/tardy record

HEATING II LAB

HAC 183

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
18A1 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Pearce, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 300 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $24.75 18/40

Credits: 4

Will teach students to competently troubleshoot and repair electric, oil, and hydronic heating equipment. Also covers thermal physics and equipment for heating-system analysis and efficiency. This is a hands-on class using live projects. Prerequisite: Must have required hand tools of the trade and be enrolled in Heating I.

Course Outcomes

  • Check a heating element and a fan motor for voltage and proper operation. Test all safety controls
  • Check a packaged sequencer and step sequencer for proper timing of heaters and fan sequence
  • Check a step down transformer for input and output voltage. Install a thermostat and adjust for proper operation
  • Check the temperature rise across the inlet and outlet of a furnace
  • Check safety controls on heating equipment
  • Change the nozzle in a burner assembly
  • Check a high voltage transformer and primary control
  • Check the oil pump on an oil furnace for proper oil pressure
  • Complete an efficiency test on an oil furnace to include; CO2 measurement, smoke test, draft check, and temperature rise
  • Select and prepare base and filler metals for welding
  • Prepare and adjust equipment based on metal type, metal thickness
  • Demonstrate safe working habits
  • Demonstrate reliability and commitment through consistent attendance and performance

ADVANCED REFRIGERATION SYSTEM

HAC 201

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
18B1 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Pearce, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 300 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $24.75 12/20

Credits: 10

Troubleshooting and repair of refrigeration equipment, thermal physics, equipment for refrigeration systems analysis and efficiency. Prerequisites: Must have required hand tools of the trade. Must be enrolled in HAC 249, 256.

Course Outcomes

  • Explain how and why we use vacuum and evacuate a refrigeration system
  • Explain how to recover, recycle and reclaim refrigerant
  • Wire a current, potential or solid state relay into a motor circuit.
  • Demonstrate proper flaring, cutting and swaging of copper tubing
  • Demonstrate the proper set up of an oxygen/acetylene torch
  • Evaluate the performance of a system with a capillary tube or TXV metering device
  • Evaluate the performance of a refrigeration system using R134A, R414 B, R22 & R404A
  • Demonstrate safe working habits
  • Demonstrate reliability and commitment through consistent attendance and performance

JOB READINESS

HAC 249

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
18D1 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Pearce, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 300 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $24.75 12/20

Credits: 5

Covers resume writing, cover letter preparation, Internet job search, Work Source job readiness workshop, and tips on filling out job applications. Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in HAC 201, 256.

Course Outcomes

  • Check heating element and fan motor for voltage and operation
  • Check packaged, step sequencers for proper timing of heating elements and fan
  • Check a step down transformer for input and output voltage. Install Thermostat adjust for proper operation
  • Check temperature rise across inlet and outlet of furnace
  • Check safety controls on heating equipment
  • Change nozzles in burner assembly
  • Check high voltage transformer and primary controls
  • Check oil pump on oil furnace for proper oil pressure
  • Do an efficiency test on an oil furnace, including CO2, smoke test and temperature rise across heat exchanger
  • Demonstrate safe working habits
  • Demonstrate reliability and commitment through consistent attendance and performance
  • Prepare a resume & cover letter for a proper job search

COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMPS

HAC 256

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
18C1 7 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Pearce, D. Bldg. 25, Rm. 300 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $24.75 12/20

Credits: 7

Troubleshoot and repair residential and commercial heat pumps through study material and DVD format. Heat pump fundamentals, heat pump electrical, and heat pump charging are explored. Prerequisites: Must have required hand tools of the trade. Must be enrolled in HAC 201, 249.

Course Outcomes

  • Students will describe a reverse- cycle heat pump
  • Students will explain a change over valve (COV) or reversing valve (RV). Identify what type of metering device is use
  • Students will check the COV for failure, either electrical or mechanical, using meters and a gauge manifold
  • Students will list and identify the components of a heat pump
  • Students will learn sequence of operation of a heat pump
  • Students will identify the various heat sources for heat pumps, and explain auxiliary heat
  • Demonstrate reliability and commitment through consistent attendance and performance

PATIENT CALCULATIONS

HDT 104

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
88C1 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 F Hybrid $25 20/20

Credits: 4

Emphasis on fractions, combined percentages, metric, apothecary measurements and conversions, Roman numerals and dosage calculation formulas. Self-paced lab. (For hemodialysis students only). Prerequisites: COMPASS score of 68 in reading and 33 in writing, or successful completion of ENG 082. COMPASS score of 37 for pre-algebra.

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

HDT 107

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8871 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 3

Covers the issues, trends, and impacts of electronic and networked information technology upon the provision of health care services in general and explores specific issues related to the hemodialysis technician profession.

Course Outcomes

  • Assess a computing system in relation to the specific needs of a Hemodialysis Technician
  • Know how Health IT has, is, and will continue to impact the field of Hemodialysis
  • Master the technology used in the practice of a Hemodialysis Technician
  • Explain the importance of and methods for maintaining patients' privacy and security using Electronic Medical Records
  • Practice patient-centered principles when using a Health IT system and electronic medical records
  • Know how to keep current on Health IT

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS/KEYBOARDING

HDT 116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8861 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 2

Students will use computers to develop touch control and proper keyboarding and keypad techniques with emphasis on alpha/numeric data entry. Course includes keyboarding alphabetic, figure, symbol keys, and skill building; continued keyboarding drills and practice to develop a minimum speed and accuracy of 35 wpm. Introduction to MS Office Suite for basic business correspondence. Internet navigation will be used for student research projects.

Course Outcomes

  • Keyboard accurately minimum of 35 wpm with 98% accuracy
  • Find specified internet web sites
  • Use MS Office Suite Outlook to send and receive e-mail
  • Ten touch key at 150 kspm with 98% accuracy

HEMODIALYSIS TERMS ANATOMY PHYSIOLOGY

HDT 122

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8891 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 W Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 6

Provides the basic techniques of medical word building to be applied in acquiring an extensive medical vocabulary. Introduces anatomical, physiological, and pathological terms relating to body systems and medical abbreviations.

Course Outcomes

    HDT 122
  • Meet or exceed knowledge of basic techniques of Medical word building
  • Demonstrate knowledge of anatomical, physiological & pathological terms
  • Identify medical abbreviations
  • Meet or exceed the ability to apply medical terms specific to the renal system

FIRST AID/CPR/HIV

HDT 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8811 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Markovits, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 July 2, 2015 WTh Hybrid $54 20/20

Credits: 1

CPR, First Aid and rescue breathing for adult patients. Includes history, causes, virility of blood-borne pathogens, bodily substance isolation, and personal protection devices relating to dealing with HIV/Aids patients. Proper lifting techniques and body mechanics will be covered. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-quarter hemodialysis classes.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate CPR competency
  • Meet or exceed knowledge of causes & virility of blood borne pathogens relating to and dealing with HIV/AIDS patients
  • Identify situations that require personal protection, device & body substance isolation

HEMODIALYSIS PRINCIPLES & PROCEDURES

HDT 131

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
88B1 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Hybrid $120 20/20

Credits: 4

Defines the basic principles of diffusion, filtration, fluid dynamics and osmosis relating to the dialysis process. Overviews of the dialysis environment and kidney functions. Patient vitals and monitoring the treatment, including normal and abnormal values. Perform laboratory tests and use patient documentation procedures. Identify causes, signs, and symptoms, preventions and interventions for medical and technical complications that may occur during dialysis. Includes patient dietary and nutrition requirements. .

Course Outcomes

  • Define basic principles of diffusion, osmosis relating to dialysis
  • Identify normal kidney function
  • Explain how dialysis treatment replaces some of the normal kidney function
  • Initiate, monitor and terminate a dialysis treatment
  • Identify complications of dialysis treatment

MACHINE SETUP/MAINTENANCE

HDT 138

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8881 4:30 p.m. 6 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $33.75 20/20

Credits: 4

Covers use and setup of hemodialysis machines. Instruction focuses on organizing and setting up the dialysis machine and equipment, priming and dry machine stringing. Various testing equipment commonly used in dialysis units are studied, as well as preparation and mixing of hemodialysis concentrates. Includes standard precautions and aseptic techniques. Prepares student to initiate monitor and terminate a routine hemodialysis treatment. .

Course Outcomes

  • Strip, clean and setup a dialysis machine in 5 minutes
  • Prime a dialysis machine using standard procedures and aseptic techniques
  • Prepare and mix solution for a dialysis treatment
  • Demonstrate use of conductivity/pH meters, test strips by reading and applying correctly
  • Simulate TX on and off procedure

WATER TREATMENT

HDT 141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8821 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Markovits, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 3

Basic concepts of water treatment and dialyzer reuse are covered, including instruction on the varied devices used in hemodialysis. Also studied are advantages and disadvantages of filters, carbon tanks, deionizers, ultraviolet light, and reverse osmosis in the treatment of water for dialysis. Students will prepare a typical water treatment monitoring schedule. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-quarter hemodialysis classes. .

Course Outcomes

  • Explain the function of the devices used to treat water for hemodialysis
  • Demonstrate knowledge of AAMI regulations as they relate to dialysis
  • Prepare a typical water treatment-monitoring log
  • Perform a chloramines test, hardness test and pH test using various equipment

VASCULAR ACCESS

HDT 149

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8831 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Markovits, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 3

The history and importance of vascular access are reviewed, including the major types of permanent and temporary vascular access. Use of appropriate needle insertion for arteriovenous fistulae and grafts. Instruction in catheter care and connections. Use the four types of anastomosis used for internal arteriovenous fistulae. Management of thrombosis, infection, hematoma, bleeding, steal syndrome, aneurysm, and catheter dislodgement. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-quarter hemodialysis classes. .

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history & importance of vascular access
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the major types of vascular access
  • Connect and disconnect dialysis following standard procedures and aseptic techniques
  • Insert fistulae needles into grafts and fistulae training arms using correct angles of insertion

PROFESSIONAL PATIENT INTERACTION

HDT 151

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8841 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Markovits, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 3

Explores the relationship and psychological boundaries between the technician, the patient, and the renal facility. Includes concepts of patient education. Basic interpersonal verbal and non-verbal communication is covered, with a focus on adapting to an individual’s special needs or cultural orientation. Students will be given the tools to develop listening skills by practicing assertive communication and developing appropriate interpersonal relationships using the concepts of patient confidentiality. Covers body mechanics and proper lifting techniques. Includes information on sexual harassment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-quarter hemodialysis classes.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand the relationship and psychological boundaries between the patient and technician
  • Use proper body mechanics & lifting techniques
  • Demonstrate proper communication with patients, coworkers and the dialysis facility

CLINICAL PRACTICUM

HDT 161

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8851 Arranged Arranged Markovits, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MWF Hybrid $39 19/19

Credits: 6

During the clinical experience, the student will participate in a dialysis facility as a member of the health care team in applying principles of hemodialysis, standard precautions, fluid management, initiating and concluding a dialysis treatment, patient and equipment monitoring, and treatment of routine hemodialysis problems in accordance with the standard dialysis procedures and policies of the facilities. Student will need to complete a total of 300 hours in the clinic. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-quarter hemodialysis classes.

Course Outcomes

  • Remove old tubing, clean machine and set-up dialysis machine for next patient
  • Identify and use proper lifting techniques
  • Initiate and conclude a dialysis treatment using standard precautions and aseptic techniques
  • Program and monitor dialysis machine correctly for each patient
  • Perform test and duties needed

FIELD STUDY

HDT 163

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
88A1 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Savona, T. Bldg. 21, Rm. 227 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Th Hybrid $29.75 20/20

Credits: 1

Familiarizes the student with various dialysis companies in the greater Puget Sound area. The students will be partnered in small groups and will be required to contact four different dialysis companies in the area in order to conduct an interview with a staff member. The information gathered will be collected into a notebook to be submitted at the end of the class. Information to be included: interview notes, locations of individual dialysis units, maps to each unit, contact person for each of the units, size of the company, etc. The notebook will be a reference for the student when seeking a dialysis technician position at the end of the course.

Course Outcomes

  • Student will compile information for future reference
  • Student will make contact with staff members for the purpose of networking. To help obtain employment when finished with Hemodialysis Technician program

HISTOLOGY INTERNSHIP

HISTO150

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6701 Arranged Arranged Haggerty, R. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $44 5/20

Credits: 10

Covers the clinical phase of working in an affiliated histology laboratory. The staff of the affiliated laboratory directly supervises students. A report of No Record on File Regarding Crimes Against Persons from the Washington State Patrol is required for participation in this class. Prerequisites: Successful completion of HISTO 135, 140 and 145. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Complete 300 hours of on-the-job training
  • Understand daily workflow of the histology laboratory
  • Perform skills with professionalism
  • Meet expectations of the clinical setting as well as those of the instructor
  • Complete checklists within student intern packet
  • Meet attendance expectations of clinical site

HISTOLOGY SEMINAR

HISTO160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
6711 Arranged Arranged Haggerty, R. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Online $55 5/20

Credits: 5

Covers what students have learned while working in an affiliated histology laboratory. Students will also review for their certification exam. Prerequisites: To be taken concurrently with HISTO 150. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • The student will read and accept, by way of signature sheet, the requirements, qualifications, exam content, continuing education, and code of ethics for the histology technician. This information is provided through recommended websites
  • The student will review safety and instrumentation via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review fixation and processing via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review fixation and processing via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review Nuclear and cytoplasmic staining and Laboratory mathematics via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review Carbohydrate and Amyloid, Connective tissue and muscle staining via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review Nerve staining via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review microorganism staining and pigment and mineral staining via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will review Immunohistochemistry via homework assignment and pass a 20 point quiz on the topic area
  • The student will complete a 100 point final

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

HS 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24D1 12:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Mandley, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 106 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 18/20

Credits: 3

Introduce students to the uses of Microsoft Windows and related programs. Students will become familiar with community resources for career and educational opportunities and will develop proficiency in the use of technology. Prerequisites: Students must be a high school graduate or have passed a high school equivalency test and have COMPASS scores of 86 for reading and 77 for writing or successful completion of ENG 094. Students must have a COMPASS pre-algebra score of 37 or higher or have successfully completed MAT 60 prior to starting the course. Students must consent to and receive a “No Record on File” report related to Crimes Against Persons from the Washington State Patrol.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate keyboarding proficiency at 20 WPM
  • Effectively utilize Microsoft Windows programs and apply knowledge through a variety of human services related activities
  • Develop and manage human services related projects
  • Produce a resume, cover letter, resource binder and demonstrate knowledge of
  • scholarships and higher education opportunities in their chosen human services field of study

INTERNSHIP I

HS 151

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2401 12 p.m. 5 p.m. Callahan-McCain, T. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Daily Hybrid $39 16/25

Credits: 5

Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their choice. Duties and tasks are supervised. Students perform relevant job duties and tasks within an agency of their choice, attend supervision meetings, identify applicable community resources, and perform other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice. Prerequisites: Students must consent to and receive a “No Record on File” report related to Crimes Against Persons. Students must complete the following first-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 237, HS 127, HS 123, HS 115, HS 225, HS 110.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Under agency supervision, correctly identify the duties associated with the position selected
  • Under agency supervision correctly identify the target client base, available services, and eligibility criteria for services related to the specific position
  • Under agency supervision demonstrate expected workplace behavior appropriate for the specific position
  • Complete self-evaluations and professional portfolio of internship work product and experiences

MENTAL HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

HS 226

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2421 9 a.m. 9:50 a.m. Callahan-McCain, T. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 19/25

Credits: 5

Explores current perspectives of mental health in the helping professions by focusing on the identification, definition, diagnostic criteria, and assessment and evaluation of psychological disorders. An emphasis will be placed on the continuum that exists between normal and abnormal behavior by examining biological, psychological and socio-cultural causal factors as they relate to adults and children. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following first-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 237, HS 127, HS 123, HS 115, HS 225, HS 110. HS 226

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify, explain and apply the primary methods for gathering information during an interview & assessment
  • Effectively utilize the DSM-IV to assess diagnostic criteria for a variety of mental disorders
  • Complete topical research and summarize through the use of existing research an analysis of issues relating to a specific interviewing topic
  • Effectively summarize client interactions using documentation styles commonly required in human services settings

DYNAMICS OF VIOLENCE

HS 228

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2411 10 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Callahan-McCain, T. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Hybrid $25 19/25

Credits: 3

Presents an overview of the dynamics of violence in relationship to both the perpetrator and the victim. Areas of emphasis include child neglect, child sexual and physical abuse, missing and exploited children and adolescents, domestic violence, the cycle of violence, elder abuse, and the impact on the family system. Strategies for treatment and community intervention are explored. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following first-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 237, HS 127, HS 123, HS 115, HS 225, HS 110.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Describe a range of issues affecting victims of abuse and their families/caregivers throughout the life-span
  • Demonstrate knowledge of physical abuse and family violence issues including the cycle of violence
  • Demonstrate knowledge of sexual abuse and perpetrator issues
  • Correctly identify disorders, strategies for treatment and community intervention
  • Define professional protocol for mandatory reporters of known or suspected abuse per state WAC’s & RCW’s

CASE MANAGEMENT

HS 230

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2451 10 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Hauzinger, I. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF Hybrid $25 10/25

Credits: 5

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of case management practice. Students will review different models of case management and learn about common case management functions such as outreach, engagement, assessment, planning, accessing resources, coordination, and advocacy. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following third-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 220, HS 227, HS 221, HS 244.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental case management skills
  • Describe the different models of case management presented during the course
  • Correctly identify case management functions such as outreach, engagement, assessment, planning, accessing resources, coordination and advocacy and their practical applications to the service population
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce a case management plan for a human services client

CULTURALLY COMPETENT PRACTICE

HS 234

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2431 10 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Callahan-McCain, T. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF Hybrid $25 17/25

Credits: 5

Provides students with an awareness of the historical, cultural, socio-economic, biological and psychosocial influences that define diversity. Examines culturally competent standards that influence best practice standards for human service workers. Students will explore culture, guidelines for culturally sensitive practices, the impact of inequality on a variety of service populations, racism, prejudice, and inclusion strategies. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following first-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 237, HS 127, HS 123, HS 115, HS 225, HS 110.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Examine the historical, cultural, socio-economic, biological and psychosocial influences that define diversity
  • Demonstrate knowledge of culturally competent practice standards for human service workers
  • Correctly identify culturally sensitive guidelines for working with a variety of diverse groups of clients
  • Define the impact of inequality on a variety of service populations from a sociocultural viewpoint

SPECIAL PROJECTS

HS 238

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24G1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 5

Increases the student’s knowledge and skill by formulating and implementing a special project related to the Human Services field. Students must obtain authorization from the instructor for the project prior to enrolling in course.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the process involved in project management
  • Take an in-depth look at chosen topic by performing research associated with the project
  • Write a detailed critical analysis of the project

SELECTED TOPICS

HS 239

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24H1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 5

Students will be responsible for performing either a literature review and/or research on a human services-related topic. Students must obtain authorization from the Instructor for the project prior to enrolling in the course.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the process involved in research
  • Take an in-depth look at their chosen topic by performing research associated with the project
  • Write a detailed critical analysis of the project

SURVEY OF ADDICTION

HS 240

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2441 9 a.m. 9:50 a.m. Hauzinger, I. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 10/25

Credits: 5

Focuses on addiction in modern society by surveying prevalent addictions and common co-occurring disorders. Students will gain an overview of causal factors and the consequences of addiction as they relate to the individual, family and community. A strengths-based perspective will focus on the biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors influencing addiction and recovery. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following third-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 220, HS 227, HS 221, HS 244.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Develop knowledge regarding addictions in our modern society
  • Identify the casual factors and consequences of addiction
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the strengths based perspective
  • Identify factors that contribute to treatment and recovery

INTERNSHIP II

HS 244

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24F1 12 p.m. 5 p.m. Callahan-McCain, T. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $14 3/20

Credits: 5

Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their choice. Duties and tasks are supervised. Students perform relevant job duties and tasks within their agency of choice, attend supervision meetings, identify applicable community resources, and perform other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice. Successful completion of Internship I is required. Prerequisites: Students must consent to and receive a “No Record on File” report related to Crimes Against Persons. Students must complete the following second-quarter Human Services Program courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 226, HS 234, HS 228, HS 151. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Under agency supervision, correctly identify the duties associated with the position selected
  • Under agency supervision correctly identify the target client base, available services, and eligibility criteria for services related to the specific position
  • Under agency supervision demonstrate expected workplace behavior appropriate for the specific position
  • Complete self-evaluations and professional portfolio of internship work product and experiences

GROUP PROCESS

HS 246

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2461 10 a.m. 11:50 a.m. Hauzinger, I. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh Hybrid $25 10/25

Credits: 3

An introduction to the dynamics of group interaction with emphasis on the student’s firsthand experience as a group leader and member. The factors involved in problems of communication, effective emotional responses, and personal growth will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on group process as a means of changing behavior. This course is designed to assist human services students who will function as group leaders and co-leaders. Prerequisites: Students must complete the following third-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 220, HS 227, HS 221, HS 244.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Participate in group experience as a group leader & co-leader
  • Identify & apply group counseling techniques as a way to change behavior
  • Identify the process for beginning a new group
  • Define the factors involved in problems of communication, and demonstrate how to teach effective emotional responses

INTERNSHIP III

HS 258

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2471 12 p.m. 5 p.m. Hauzinger, I. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Daily Hybrid $39 8/25

Credits: 5

Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their choice. Duties and tasks are supervised. Students perform relevant job duties and tasks within their agency of choice, attend supervision meetings, identify applicable community resources, and perform other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice. Successful completion of Internship II is required. Prerequisites: Students must consent to and receive a “No Record on File” report related to Crimes Against Persons. Students must complete the following third-quarter Human Services courses with a C grade or above to be eligible to take this course: HS 220, HS 227, HS 221, HS 244. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Under agency supervision, correctly identify the duties associated with the position selected
  • Under agency supervision correctly identify the target client base, available services, and eligibility criteria for services related to the specific position
  • Under agency supervision demonstrate expected workplace behavior appropriate for the specific position
  • Complete self-evaluations and professional portfolio of internship work product and experiences

CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY & THE LAW

HSCD 228

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
2481 5 p.m. 7:15 p.m. Fitzgerald, C. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $0 3/20
241L 3 p.m. 5 p.m. Anderson, C. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th In-Person $0 15/20

Credits: 2

Examines the federal and state laws that pertain to chemical dependency for individuals and facilities. Students also become familiar with the criminal, civil, and juvenile court systems. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the law as it applies to the Chemical Dependency profession and practice of addiction treatment
  • Demonstrate knowledge of discipline specific ethics codes
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the benefits of clinical supervision and professional growth

CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY & COUNSELING II: ADULT/FAMILY

HSCD 249

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
241C 3:30 p.m. 6 p.m. Anderson, C. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $0 15/20
2491 Arranged Arranged French, S. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 3/20

Credits: 5

Become familiar with culturally competent models of diagnosis and intervention for families and adolescents, and build an understanding for the dynamics among family members. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the characteristics & dynamics of families & adolescents affected by substance abuse
  • Become familiar with the appropriate models of intervention and the use of those interventions
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the interaction that occurs between the family system and substance abuse
  • Learn adolescent developmental issues and their impact on the treatment process

RELAPSE PREVENTION

HSCD 251

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
241R 3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Anderson, C. Bldg. 02, Rm. 120 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $0 15/20
24A1 7:45 p.m. 10 p.m. Fitzgerald, C. Bldg. 02, Rm. 112 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W In-Person $0 2/20

Credits: 3

Become familiar with the basic philosophy and techniques of relapse prevention for substance abuse and the ongoing process that involves all aspects of the person’s wellness and culture. Learn to recognize the warnings signs for relapse, the 12-step approach to recovery, and general wellness concepts. Instructor permission required.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the basic philosophy of relapse prevention
  • Become familiar with relapse prevention strategies and techniques
  • Understand warning signs, symptoms, and causes of substance abuse relapse
  • Learn how to teach basic skills to clients that will reduce relapse

SPECIAL PROJECTS

HSCD 256

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24J1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20
24B1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 5

Students will be responsible for formulating and implementing ideas to complete a special project related to the human services field. Students must obtain authorization from the instructor for the project prior to enrolling in the course.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the process involved in project management
  • Take an in-depth look at chosen topic by performing research associated with the project
  • Write a detailed critical analysis of the project

SELECTED TOPICS

HSCD 259

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
24K1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20
24C1 Arranged Arranged Callahan-McCain, T. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 2/20

Credits: 5

Explores a human services chemical dependency related topic by students performing either a literature review and/or research on a human services related topic. Students must obtain authorization from the instructor for the project prior to enrolling in the course.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Understand the process involved in research
  • Take an in-depth look at their chosen topic by performing research associated with the project
  • Write a detailed critical analysis of the project

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH UNIT COORDINATOR

HUC 102

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8101 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Perez, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $99.75 8/20

Credits: 7

This course will focus on orientation and introduction to campus policies and rules of conduct. This course will also introduce the student to program policies, dress code, attendance, classroom, and workplace rules of conduct, program goals, and grading system. The focus also in this unit will be instruction and demonstrations on the use of various communication devices and introduction to the EMR/HER and related Windows programs used in the hospital. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • In a group discussion, accurately describe:
    • The rules, standards, and policies of Clover Park Technical College
    • The rules, standards and policies of the Health Unit Coordinator program
  • Accurately state college policies concerning attendance, holidays, student services, campus speed limits, smoking areas, and fire drills
  • Accurately state the program policies concerning attendance, dress code, grading system, grade average, and student evaluation process
  • Correctly describe the leadership duties of the student health unit coordinator
  • Accurately operate the nursing unit communication systems: computer terminal, telephone, imprinter device, and embosser
  • Correctly prepare patient consent forms
  • Effectively manage the patient’s charts
  • Effectively recognize and maintain the nursing unit supplies
  • Consistently and correctly practice within the professional ethical framework of health unit coordinating
  • Communicate effectively with the instructor, classmates, and members of the health care team
  • Accurately define medical terms and abbreviations related to this unit
  • Accurately discuss stages of how health unit coordinating evolved
  • Accurately discuss the overall functions of the health unit coordinator
  • Accurately discuss the name of nursing units and describe the services provided by each unit
  • Accurately identify the title of physicians serving in a medical specialty field
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate rules of telephone etiquette as presented in class
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate the use of the telephone hold button as presented in class
  • Accurately discuss computer components that are usually located at the nurse’s station
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate items to be recorded when taking a telephone message as presented in class

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY FOR HEALTH UNIT COORDINATOR

HUC 106

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8111 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Perez, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh In-Person $4.75 8/20

Credits: 3

Introduces basic word elements used in building medical terminology and identifies the different types of word elements present in each medical term by name. Introduces medical terms, body structure, and pathology in relation to each body system: integumentary, musculoskeletal, sensory, circulatory, nervous, endocrine, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: HUC 102. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • In a group discussion, accurately describe:
    • The rules, standards, and policies of Clover Park Technical College
    • The rules, standards and policies of the Health Unit Coordinator program
  • Accurately state college policies concerning attendance, holidays, student services, campus speed limits, smoking areas, and fire drills
  • Accurately state the program policies concerning attendance, dress code, grading system, grade average, and student evaluation process
  • Correctly describe the leadership duties of the student health unit coordinator
  • Accurately operate the nursing unit communication systems: computer terminal, telephone, imprinter device, and embosser
  • Correctly prepare patient consent forms
  • Effectively manage the patient’s charts
  • Effectively recognize and maintain the nursing unit supplies
  • Consistently and correctly practice within the professional ethical framework of health unit coordinating
  • Communicate effectively with the instructor, classmates, and members of the health care team

UNIT COORDINATOR TASKS & PROCEDURES I

HUC 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8121 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Perez, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 M In-Person $77.75 8/20

Credits: 8

Enables identification of the forms commonly used in the patient’s chart and enables students to explain the purpose of a patient’s chart and recognize the charting responsibilities for each health care team member. Presents instruction and procedures for scheduling appointments by telephone, computer and writing. Also focuses on students’ performance in the computer skill laboratory, demonstrating their cognitive knowledge for maintaining medical records; ordering laboratory and diagnostic exams; accurately transcribing physicians’ orders; recognizing treatment orders; ordering nursing supplies; identifying abbreviations, symbols, and terms used in a medication order; and charting information accurately to the appropriate forms and the Kardex for their pseudo patients. Prerequisites: HUC 102; enrollment in HUC 106.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Accurately define terms and abbreviations related to each body system
  • Accurately distinguish between anatomy and physiology
  • Accurately list the main functions of each body system
  • Correctly complete statements concerning the characteristics of each body system
  • Accurately state the meaning of basic combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes of medical terms related to each body system
  • Accurately complete statements concerning pathology of each body system
  • Given the meaning of medical conditions relating to each body system, build the word elements and identify the corresponding medical terms
  • Accurately name the organs and describe the functions of each body system
  • Accurately identify medical terms, which are surgical procedures, as well as those, which are diagnostic studies in relation to each body system

UNIT COORDINATOR TASKS & PROCEDURES II

HUC 112

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8131 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MThF In-Person $4.75 15/20

Credits: 4

Focuses on cognitive knowledge and performance skills in the computer laboratory. The student will demonstrate performance skills for maintaining medical records, accurately transcribing physicians’ orders to the appropriate chart forms and Kardex, as well as completion of pseudo patient charts. Prerequisite: HUC 109: completion of 104, 106, 113, and 120. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Accurately define medical terms, abbreviations, and symbols related to this course
  • Accurately transcribe, communicate, and demonstrate the procedure for preparation of forms for patient activities
  • Correctly maintain confidentiality of patient information
  • Accurately transcribe, interpret, and demonstrate procedures for admission, transfer, and discharge orders
  • Accurately transcribe, communicate, and demonstrate maintenance of patient charts
  • Accurately transcribe, interpret, and demonstrate procedures for standing, standing prn, stat, one-time, and short series orders for medication and treatment orders
  • Correctly interpret and demonstrate procedures for physician orders to nursing staff and other hospital departments
  • Accurately complete pseudo patient charts

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION IN THE HUC ROLE

HUC 113

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8141 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 15/20

Credits: 1

Enables the student to describe and utilize good listening skills as a means of preventing and/or solving conflicts with a variety of people in different situations. The focus will also include developing skills for the role of the communicator for the nursing unit. The student will also be given the tools for developing and practicing assertive communication, interpersonal relationships, and confidentiality skills. Prerequisite: HUC 102.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Correctly define medical terms and abbreviations related to this unit of instruction
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate responsibilities of the Health Unit Coordinator for effective communication skills
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate responsibilities of the Health Unit Coordinator for interpersonal relationships when interacting with physicians, other hospital staff, patients, and visitors

ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATIONS IN THE HUC ROLE

HUC 118

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8151 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTTh Hybrid $29.75 15/20

Credits: 2

Improve communication among diverse culture and incorporate the relevant needs of culturally diverse groups in the medical field. Provide the student with an overview and understanding of the fundamentals of communication.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Accurately define medical terms, abbreviations, and symbols related to this course
  • Accurately transcribe, communicate, and demonstrate the procedure for preparation of forms for patient activities
  • Correctly maintain confidentiality of patient information
  • Accurately transcribe, interpret, and demonstrate procedures for admission, transfer, and discharge orders
  • Accurately transcribe, communicate, and demonstrate maintenance of patient charts
  • Accurately transcribe, interpret, and demonstrate procedures for standing, standing prn, stat, one-time, and short series orders for medication and treatment orders
  • Correctly interpret and demonstrate procedures for physician orders to nursing staff and other hospital departments
  • Accurately complete pseudo patient charts

UNIT MANAGEMENT

HUC 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8161 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Perez, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 W In-Person $4.75 8/20

Credits: 3

Covers management responsibilities for the nursing unit, including time management and identification of possible fire and safety hazards on the nursing unit. Prerequisite: HUC 102; enrollment in HUC 106, 109, and 113. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Accurately define medical terms, abbreviations and symbols related to this unit of instruction
  • Accurately discuss hospital departments and describe the purpose of each
  • Accurately identify standard chart forms and requisitions, and describe the purpose of each
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate responsibilities for transcribing, communicating, and preparation of forms for patient activities
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate methods used to maintain confidentiality of patient information
  • Accurately discuss the purpose of the patient chart and kardex / pathway
  • Accurately discuss responsibilities for transcribing, communicating, and demonstrate maintenance procedures of patient’s chart
  • Accurately discuss responsibilities for transcribing, communicating and demonstrate, admission, transfer and discharge procedures
  • Correctly describe the cause, treatment, prevention techniques, and ways of protection for the spread of AIDS
  • Accurately define standing, standing prn, stat, one-time, and short series orders for medication and treatment orders
  • Accurately discuss responsibilities for interpreting and communicating physician’s orders
  • Accurately discuss responsibilities for transcribing, communicating, and demonstrate ordering treatments from other hospital departments
  • Accurately discuss and demonstrate responsibilities for preparation and completion of fourteen pseudo patient charts

UNIT MANAGEMENT II

HUC 122

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8171 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TW In-Person $4.75 15/20

Credits: 3

Focus is on cognitive knowledge for managing the nursing unit and developing communication skills using verbal and written communication. The student will develop leadership and performance skills by practicing classroom management. Prerequisites: Completion of HUC 113 and 120. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Correctly define medical terms and abbreviations related to this course
  • Accurately and effectively demonstrate verbal and written communication skills to convey information
  • Accurately discuss areas of management on the nursing unit in a hospital
  • Accurately define the term manage, as it relates to the duties of the Health Unit Coordinator
  • Accurately and effectively demonstrate leadership skills

LEGAL/ETHICAL ASPECTS OF UNIT COORDINATING

HUC 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8181 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 WF In-Person $4.75 15/20

Credits: 2

Enables the student to identify legal elements that are necessary in regard to preparing legal documents, discussing hospital and patient confidentiality, or witnessing signatures on consents for treatment. The ethics of this profession will be explored and how to apply these ethics in professional behaviors. AIDS education, blood-borne pathogens, HIPAA and hepatitis information will also be covered. Prerequisites: Completion of HUC 102, 106, 109, 113, and 120; enrollment in HUC 112, 118, and 122.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Accurately define medical terms and abbreviations related to this module
  • Accurately discuss professional standards for health unit coordinators
  • Accurately describe and demonstrate ethical behavior

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

HUC 132

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8191 8 a.m. 2:45 p.m. Briggs, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $14 15/20

Credits: 7

Enables the student to use the cognitive and performance objectives from courses HUC 102 through 126 in the clinical setting. The focus is on preparation of a resume, employment application, and an employment interview. In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program, students must receive a No Record on File report from the Washington State Patrol regarding Crimes Against Persons. Clinical hours vary from six to eight hours per day, four days a week. Students unable to complete course HUC 132 will have the option of completing clinical rotation with the next available program, on approval from the instructors, within six months. Prerequisite: Completion of HUC 102, 106, 109, 113, 120, 112, 122, and 126.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate basic skills and knowledge in professional behavior expected of a Health Unit Coordinator in the work place
  • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for performance of non-clinical skills that are necessary in the hospital, clinic, extended care facility, and physician’s office
  • Accurately transcribe physician orders, utilizing knowledge of anatomy and physiology, medical terms and abbreviations
  • Demonstrate proficiency in meeting performance objectives in a clinical setting
  • Demonstrate effective communicate skills with patients, visitors, and members of the health care team
  • Accurately discuss and prepare a resume and employment application.
  • Accurately discuss strategies for planning and preparation for an employment interview

ECG MONITOR TECHNICIAN

HUC 204

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
81A1 6:15 p.m. 9:15 p.m. Perez, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 105 July 7, 2015 Aug. 4, 2015 TWThF In-Person $0 9/20

Credits: 3

This course will examine basic cardiac function, normal and abnormal cardiac rhythms, etiology of arrhythmias and interpretation of EKG tracing. Class time will consist of lectures, identifying rhythms and group challenges. Cardiac rhythms can be relatively straight or amazingly confounding. Not to worry! The purpose of this course is to provide you with an excellent baseline understanding of both the simple and more complex rhythms.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Describe electrical activation of the normal heart related to EKG tracing
  • Implement a systematic approach to reading rhythm strips
  • Identify equipment required for cardiac monitoring
  • Understand the concept of paper time in order to calculate heart rate
  • Identify the Atrial and Ventricular rhythms
  • Describe or identify Precordial Shock or Cardioversion
  • Describe or identify EKG manifestations associated with Electrolyte changes and Ischemia

LEADERSHIP I

LEADR100

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0570 Arranged Arranged Erwin, C. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 1/20

Credits: 6

Students taking this course will gain a basic understanding of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and developing and improving their own leadership skills. This course integrates leadership studies through study, observation and application. This course will encourage a high level of class discussion and active participation. You will have a chance to work through case studies, participate in simulations, interact with experienced leaders, analyze popular films using leadership themes, and discuss the impact of current events and the realities of leadership.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Develop a fundamental understanding of leadership and the skills necessary for effective leadership and improve leadership abilities
  • Articulate personal leadership values, team building strategies, effective conflict management skills and the concept of servant leadership
  • Demonstrate effective decision making, ethical leadership and techniques to empower others
  • Improve their leadership abilities

LEADERSHIP II

LEADR101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0571 Arranged Arranged Erwin, C. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 6

Students taking this course will gain a basic understanding of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and developing and improving their own leadership skills. This course integrates leadership studies through study, observation and application. This course will encourage a high level of class discussion and active participation. You will have a chance to work through case studies, participate in simulations, interact with experienced leaders, analyze popular films using leadership themes, and discuss the impact of current events and the realities of leadership.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Develop a fundamental understanding of leadership and the skills necessary for effective leadership and improve leadership abilities
  • Articulate personal leadership values, team building strategies, effective conflict management skills and the concept of servant leadership
  • Demonstrate effective decision making, ethical leadership and techniques to empower others
  • Improve their leadership abilities

LEADERSHIP III

LEADR102

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0581 Arranged Arranged Erwin, C. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 6

Students taking this course will gain a basic understanding of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and developing and improving their own leadership skills. This course integrates leadership studies through study, observation and application. This course will encourage a high level of class discussion and active participation. You will have a chance to work through case studies, participate in simulations, interact with experienced leaders, analyze popular films using leadership themes, and discuss the impact of current events and the realities of leadership.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Develop a fundamental understanding of leadership and the skills necessary for effective leadership and improve leadership abilities
  • Articulate personal leadership values, team building strategies, effective conflict management skills and the concept of servant leadership
  • Demonstrate effective decision making, ethical leadership and techniques to empower others
  • Improve their leadership abilities

LEADERSHIP IV

LEADR103

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0572 Arranged Arranged Erwin, C. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 0/20

Credits: 6

Students taking this course will gain a basic understanding of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and developing and improving their own leadership skills. This course integrates leadership studies through study, observation and application. This course will encourage a high level of class discussion and active participation. You will have a chance to work through case studies, participate in simulations, interact with experienced leaders, analyze popular films using leadership themes, and discuss the impact of current events and the realities of leadership.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Develop a fundamental understanding of leadership and the skills necessary for effective leadership and improve leadership abilities
  • Articulate personal leadership values, team building strategies, effective conflict management skills and the concept of servant leadership
  • Demonstrate effective decision making, ethical leadership and techniques to empower others
  • Improve their leadership abilities

BODY SYSTEMS THEORY 102

MAP 147

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3851 3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Keith, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Web-Enhanced $25 21/20

Credits: 4

Caring for patients with disorders associated with opthathmology and otolaryngology, pulmonary medicine, neurology and mental health, and cardiology. Instruction will include anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and terminology. Prerequisites: Completion of MAP 121 and 124. Corequisites: MAP 163, 171 and 179.

For item 3851, in addition to M/W classes we will meet two Fridays, 7/31 & 8/7 during regular class times (3:30-6:30 p.m.)

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Define and describe the structures and functions of the sensory system, pulmonary system, neurology & mental health and cardiovascular system
  • Identify the most common pathological conditions affecting the sensory system, pulmonary system, neurology & mental health and cardiovascular system
  • Specify drug classifications related to the sensory system, pulmonary system, neurology & mental health and cardiovascular system
  • Build, analyze, define, pronounce and spell words related to the sensory system, pulmonary system, neurology & mental health and cardiovascular system
  • Cite diagnostic procedures commonly used in the sensory system, pulmonary system, neurology & mental health and cardiovascular system

BODY SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS 102

MAP 163

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3861 3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Keith, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 122 July 2, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $25 20/20

Credits: 3

Practice fundamental skills relating to Body Systems Theory 102. Skills include practicing care and usage of the otoscope, ear/eye exams, audiometry, peak flow meters and small volume nebulizers, and performing ECGs. Prerequisites: Completion of MAP’s 121 and 124. Co requisites: MAP 147, 171 and 179.

For item 3861, in addtion to T/Th classes we will meet three Fridays, 7/31, 8/21, 8/31 during regular class times (3:30-6:30 p.m.)

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Demonstrate the care and use of the ophthalmoscope and the otoscope
  • Perform audiometry testing and perform vision testing and record results
  • Demonstrate the use of a peak flow meter and small volume nebulizer
  • Obtain throat specimens for culturing, perform rapid strep A test
  • Perform a basic 12-lead electrocardiogram and mount an electrocardiogram strip for reading
  • Participate in mock clinic at assigned level

AUTOMATED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

MAP 171

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3841 7 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Keith, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 104 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 19/20

Credits: 4

Practice fundamental skills relating to ICD9 and CPT coding using the computer. Included are computerized patient scheduling and procedures for accounts receivable management for both private patients and insurance companies. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MAP 182 and 184. Corequisites: MAP 166, 169, 179 and 213.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Covers the general flow of information in a medical office and the role that computers play
  • Input data, and use Medisoft software to simulate billing patients, filing claims, recording data, printing reports, and scheduling appointments
  • Introduce the topic of electronic health records

HEALTH INSURANCE, CODING PRACTICES & BILLING & COLLECTING

MAP 179

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3831 7 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Keith, L. Bldg. 21, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 July 28, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 17/20

Credits: 5

Acquire information regarding private and public insurance programs. Practice fundamental skills relating to ICD-9 and CPT coding using the computer and specific software. Includes patient scheduling and procedures for accounts receivable management for both private patients and insurance companies. Prerequisite: Completion of MAP 182 and 184. Corequisites: MAP 147, 163 and 171

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify and describe types of medical insurance, including group, individual and government-sponsored (public) health benefit plans and explain the differences between them
  • Explain the system of Managed Care and how this concept legally and ethically affects patient care
  • Outline the fundamentals of insurance billing, including the information required on a medical claim form and explain why each piece of information is needed
  • List and discuss the two major coding systems used to describe diseases, injuries and procedures in the medical practice environment and describe the relationship between coding and reimbursement
  • Identify and/or perform patient scheduling & billing procedures including payment at time of service, credit policy, and manual billing methods and cite the legal considerations in extending credit and credit collection

INVASIVE PROCEDURES

MAP 210

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3801 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Jones, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 122 July 1, 2015 July 15, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $50 10/20

Credits: 4

Introduction of pharmacology math (with estimation components), administering oral and parental (intramuscular, subcutaneous, and intradermal) medications, performance of phlebotomy and microbiology, and student demonstration of patient flow. Prerequisites: Successful completion of quarters 1-4 including general education courses and compliance with the MAP immunization policy and health insurance policy. Corequisites: MAP 215 and 222.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Define and spell the key terms
  • Obtain blood specimens by venipuncture as instructed in previous course
  • Obtain blood specimens utilizing the butterfly collection system
  • Calculate drug dosages using the ratio-proportion formula with estimation components
  • Prepare an injection
  • Administer intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular injections
  • Administer an intramuscular injection using the Z-track method
  • Calculate drug dosages using the ratio-proportion formula
  • Observe patient safety and comfort
  • Follow Universal/Standard Precautions
  • Participate in mock clinic at assigned level

EXTERNSHIP

MAP 215

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3821 Arranged Arranged Jones, M. Arranged July 16, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 Arranged Web-Enhanced $39 10/20

Credits: 8

Capstone course gives students practical experiences in physician offices and/or clinics. Student must successfully pass MAP 210 in order to be eligible for this course. Corequisites: MAP 210 and 222.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Participate as a member of the health care team on a student medical assistant level
  • Demonstrate principles of professional appearance, conduct, and attendance according to program standards
  • Apply both administrative and clinical basic knowledge to patient care
  • Use Universal/Standard Precautions in the delivery of patient care
  • Use criticism to improve performance
  • Maintain patient confidentiality

COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND LOCATIONS

MAP 222

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
3811 9 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jones, M. Bldg. 21, Rm. 122 Aug. 27, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTThF Hybrid $29.75 10/20

Credits: 1

Locate the major medical employers (including hospitals) in the student’s community, along with their human resource department. This course also includes interviewing techniques, updating your resume, and methods of applying for employment through a variety of sources. Prerequisites: Co-requisites: MAPs 215 and 210. .

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Identify the major medical employers in the community
  • Locate employment opportunities through the newspaper, internet, employment agencies, etc
  • Identify human resource department for large healthcare employers
  • Update cover letter and resume in preparation for job searching, along with participate in mock interview process
  • Complete forms to exit program and prepare for national certification exam

ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY & PATHOLOGY II

MASST111

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
12D1 5:30 p.m. 8 p.m. Slegers, E. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 2, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 TTh In-Person $50 9/20

Credits: 5

Explores endocrinology, cardiovascular, digestive and respiratory systems.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of normal Anatomy and Physiology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of pathological changes
  • Demonstrate how these systems relate to massage therapy

COMPLEMENTARY MASSAGE MODALITIES I

MASST116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1281 5:30 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Priest, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 305 July 1, 2015 Aug. 5, 2015 MWF In-Person $85 9/20

Credits: 3

Introduces the student to a variety of massage modalities that can be safely integrated into a massage practice. Modalities covered include fascial techniques, acupressure, seated massage and side-lying. Indications, contra-indications and treatment modifications will be identified. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 114 and MASST 117.

Course Outcomes

  • Set up a seated massage chair for the comfort of their clients and themselves
  • Perform a 15 minute seated massage utilizing proper techniques and body mechanics
  • Describe the components of fascia, and why healthy fascia is important to the health of an individual
  • Assess and treat superficial fascial restrictions
  • Identify common acupressure points, and demonstrate how to treat those points
  • Safely put their client in a side-lying position, showing proper draping, and utilizing proper body mechanics to perform a safe and effective massage
  • Perform both a pre- and post- event sports massage, and be able to describe the different signs and symptoms of thermal emergencies

KINESIOLOGY: TRUNK AND MODALITIES I

MASST130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
12A1 8 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Priest, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 2, 2015 July 30, 2015 Th In-Person $85 8/20

Credits: 1

Continue the study of movement. This course builds upon the principles and skills for locating and identifying bony landmarks and muscles of the trunk using palpation techniques, movement and anatomical terminology. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 126.

Course Outcomes

  • Use proper anatomical terminology to explain movements and relationships between different body areas
  • Identify and palpate muscles of the trunk and spine by origin, insertion, fiber direction and actions
  • Demonstrate safe, effective and professional palpation skills

COMPLEMENTARY MASSAGE MODALITIES II

MASST136

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1291 5:30 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Priest, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 305 Aug. 10, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF In-Person $85 9/20

Credits: 2

Introduces the student to a variety of massage modalities that can be safely integrated into a massage practice. Modalities covered include pregnancy massage, sports massage, and hydrotherapy, including hot stone massage. Indications, contraindications, and treatment modifications will be identified. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 114 and MASST 117.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the treatment modifications for pregnant clients bases upon a variety of variables
  • Apply hydrotherapy in a safe and effective manner
  • Recognize common indications and contraindications for the modality that they are using

KINESIOLOGY: HEAD AND NECK

MASST137

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
12C1 8 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Priest, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 Aug. 6, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Th In-Person $85 7/20

Credits: 1

Continue the study of movement. This course builds upon the principles and skills for locating and identifying bony landmarks and muscles of the head and neck, using palpation techniques, movement, and anatomical terminology. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 126.

Course Outcomes

  • Use proper anatomical terminology to explain movements and relationships between different body areas
  • Identify and palpate muscles of the head and neck by origin, insertion, fiber direction and actions
  • Demonstrate safe, effective and professional palpation skills

MASSAGE BUSINESS & ETHICS I

MASST143

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
12B1 8 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Priest, J. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $50 8/20

Credits: 2

Introduces the learner to important business knowledge, skills and professional ethics vital to the successful practice of massage therapy after licensure. Students will know and follow professional ethics as related to massage, learn and practice universal safety precautions, use and understand common medical terms, research the different avenues of employment available, and begin the process of building a successful massage business.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the steps to goal achievement
  • Choose and pursue the appropriate career path in massage therapy
  • Communicate safely and effectively with both clients and other health care providers
  • Utilize proper hygiene and universal safety precautions in all aspects of their practice
  • Know and follow professional ethics as it applies to both massage therapy and health care providers in Washington State

CLINICAL MASSAGE THEORY: SPECIAL POPULATIONS

MASST149

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1201 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 Aug. 12, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W Hybrid $75 4/20

Credits: 5

Explores how massage can be modified to safely and effectively treat individuals who have unique situations that could include physical, emotional and health-related challenges. Indications and contraindications will be discussed as they apply to each population. To be taken concurrently with MASST 151DIV. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish Massage Practitioner program, completion of a similar program from another accredited institution, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Choose and correctly apply techniques specific to the conditions discussed
  • List both indications and contraindications for each condition
  • Justify the use of a specific technique in order to help achieve a treatment goal

CLINICAL MASSAGE PRACTICE: SPECIAL POPULATIONS

MASST151

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1211 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. LAB Aug. 6, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTTh In-Person $85 4/20

Credits: 3

Practice techniques and positioning to adapt massage to safely and effectively treat individuals who have unique situations that could include physical, emotional and health-related challenges. Indications and contraindications will be discussed as they apply to each population. To be taken concurrently with MASST 149. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish Massage Practitioner program, completion of a similar program from another accredited institution, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Choose and correctly apply techniques specific to the conditions discussed

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • MASST 153
  • Safely and effectively assess and treat the upper extremity
  • Identify indications and contraindications to treatment
  • Recognize when to refer a client to another Health Care Provider for assessment or treatment

ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT: UPPER EXTREMITY

MASST153

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1221 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 15, 2015 July 27, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $50 4/20

Credits: 2

Detailed and extensive review of the structure and function of the upper extremity. Students will explore common musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies that can affect the arm and shoulder, and how to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions. Prerequisite: Completion of MASST 115 and MASST 123, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT: LOWER EXTREMITY

MASST155

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1231 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 29, 2015 Aug. 5, 2015 MTWTh In-Person $50 5/20

Credits: 2

Detailed and extensive review of the structure and function of the lower extremity. Students will explore common musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies that can affect the lower extremity, and how to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 115 and MASST 123, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Safely and effectively assess and treat the lower extremity
  • Identify indications and contraindications to treatment
  • Recognize when to refer a client to another Health Care Provider for assessment or treatment

ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT: HEAD AND NECK

MASST157

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1241 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 1, 2015 July 13, 2015 MWTh In-Person $50 5/20

Credits: 2

Detailed and extensive review of the structure and function of the head and neck. Students will explore common musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies that can affect the head and neck and formulate a treatment plan to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 115 and MASST 123, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Safely and effectively assess and treat the head and neck
  • Identify indications and contraindications to treatment
  • Recognize when to refer a client to another Health Care Provider for assessment or treatment

CLINICAL MASSAGE BUSINESS AND ETHICS II

MASST159

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1251 12:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 7, 2015 July 28, 2015 T In-Person $50 5/20

Credits: 1

Prepares the learner to communicate with insurance companies and leads the learner through the process of billing insurance companies for services, from codes to filling out forms and follow-up. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 139, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Recognize and use the ICD9 and CPT codes for billing
  • Fill out common insurance billing forms
  • Communicate with insurance companies and claims adjustors in order to check status of a claim, and facilitate payments

PRACTICUM II

MASST160

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1261 9 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Meziere, Y. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 10, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 F In-Person $64 4/20

Credits: 3

Allows the student to choose and pursue individual workplace experience opportunities. This opportunity may be in a supervised internship setting, on-site events, and/or practice in Clover Park Technical College’s student-run massage clinic. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish Massage Practitioner program, completion of a similar program from another accredited institution, or currently a Washington State licensed massage practitioner.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform and document massage sessions in a professional, courteous and ethical manner
  • Work well in a group setting, cooperating with others, and contributing to the over-all success of the endeavor
  • Perform self-evaluations and develop plans for personal and professional improvement

CLINICAL ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

MASST163

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
1271 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Slegers, E. Bldg. 08, Rm. 108 July 7, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 T In-Person $50 5/20

Credits: 3

Continues the exploration of body systems with an emphasis on the common pathologies of those systems started in MASST 147. In addition to covering the cause and effect of those pathologies, the learner will also be presented with the common allopathic treatments their clients may be receiving for those conditions. Pharmacology will include effects and side-effects of the medications, and how those relate to the indications and contraindications of massage. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 147.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate proficiency in Internal A&P Disorders
  • Discuss conceptual understanding of R/T Systems
  • Work effectively as a team member
  • Explore, discuss, and address openly thoughts and ideas
  • Create time, be self-motivated in studying A&P
  • Discuss conceptual understanding of Internal Pathologies and how massage can benefit them
  • Improve ability with Critical Thinking Skills
  • Critically understanding the basis for Diagnosis and Treatment of Internal A&P Disorders

FUNDAMENTALS OF ARITHMETIC

MAT 060

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W03 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Alexander, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 5/30
5W02 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Alexander, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 14/30
5W01 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Alexander, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 203 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $25 5/30

Credits: 5

Comprehensive instruction in basic arithmetic including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions and percentages. Math vocabulary and problem solving strategies and approaches are taught. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score is required.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand whole numbers and their place value system.
  • Use standard notation, expanded notation, and word name to express whole numbers.
  • Understand and perform the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers.
  • Apply the rules of rounding-off when estimating appropriate answers.
  • Understand the fractional parts of whole numbers and apply the concept in real-life applications.
  • Use the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to solve fractional problems.
  • Understand and identify place value.
  • Use the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to solve decimal problems.
  • Understand and solve conversions between decimals and fractions.
  • Understand percent word problems and perform conversions from decimal to percent; percent to decimal; and percent to fraction.
  • Use a ratio to compare quantities.
  • Determine whether a portion is a true portion.
  • Analyze and solve everyday problems that involve unit pricing, rate of discount and sales tax.
  • Become familiar with computer-assisted learning skills. {Skills Tutor}.

PRE-ALGEBRA

MAT 082

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W05 9:10 a.m. 10:05 a.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 0/0
5W09 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 113 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 11/0
5W14 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Hughes, R. South Hill Campus Room 107 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 2/0
5W13 4:10 p.m. 6:40 p.m. Herring, B. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 18/0
5W12 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 4, 2015 Aug. 29, 2015 Sa In-Person $4.75 8/0
5W11 9:10 a.m. 10:55 a.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh In-Person $4.75 9/0
5W10 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Stultz, D. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 6/0
5W08 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Schmeling, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 6/0
5W07 1:50 p.m. 2:45 p.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 5/30
5W06 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 11/30
5W04 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 7/30

Credits: 5

Covers basic operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and proportions, signed numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations, order of operations, basic geometry, units of measurement, and introduction to statistics. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 60 is required.

Note:

These courses are self-paced labs, which gives students the opportunity to finish the course in a higher math than what they started in based upon the amount of work achieved by the students. These are ideal for those needing the extra help, since these classes also have assigned tutors.;

Learn about CPTC's Self-Paced Labs.

Self-Paced Labs:: 5W12, 5W14, 5W15, 5W16, 5W17.

Course Outcomes

  • Use basic operations to solve whole number problems
  • Use basic operations to solve decimal problems
  • Use basic operations to solve fraction problems
  • Solve problems using ratios and proportions
  • Solve percentage problems
  • Understand and use the metric system of measurement
  • Understand and use the United States conventional system of measurement
  • Apply problem solving strategies to solve word problems
  • Understand and use basic geometry
  • Understand and do some basic statistics

INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA

MAT 091

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W21 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 113 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 15/0
5W26 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Hughes, R. South Hill Campus Room 107 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 4/0
5W25 4:10 p.m. 6:40 p.m. Herring, B. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 6/0
5W24 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 4, 2015 Aug. 29, 2015 Sa In-Person $4.75 6/0
5W23 9:10 a.m. 10:55 a.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh In-Person $4.75 6/0
5W22 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Stultz, D. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 5/0
5W20 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Schmeling, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 20/0
5W19 Arranged Arranged Schmeling, L. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $29.75 22/30
5W18 3 p.m. 3:55 p.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 8/30
5W17 1:50 p.m. 2:45 p.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $4.75 6/30
5W16 12:40 p.m. 1:35 p.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 202 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 6/30
5W15 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Mollas, T. Bldg. 16, Rm. 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh Hybrid $29.75 28/30

Credits: 5

Develops algebraic topics including algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, coordinate graphing, systems of equations, polynomials, factoring and introduction to rational expressions. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 082 is required.

Note:

These courses are self-paced labs, which gives students the opportunity to finish the course in a higher math than what they started in based upon the amount of work achieved by the students. These are ideal for those needing the extra help, since these classes also have assigned tutors.;

Learn about CPTC's Self-Paced Labs.

Self-Paced Labs: 5W25, 5W27, 5W28, 5W29, 5W30.

Course Outcomes

  • Apply order of operations to simplify or evaluate algebraic expressions
  • Solve linear equations and inequalities
  • Understand and use roots and exponents
  • Use basic operations to simplify polynomials
  • Graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve linear systems
  • Apply basic operations to rational expressions

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

MAT 099

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
5W29 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Sandoval, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 113 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/0
5W34 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Hughes, R. South Hill Campus Room 107 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $4.75 5/0
5W33 4:10 p.m. 6:40 p.m. Herring, B. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW In-Person $4.75 4/0
5W32 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 4, 2015 Aug. 29, 2015 Sa In-Person $4.75 16/0
5W31 9:10 a.m. 10:55 a.m. Parnell, S. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh In-Person $4.75 5/0
5W30 12:40 a.m. 1:35 p.m. Stultz, D. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/0
5W28 8 a.m. 8:55 a.m. Schmeling, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/0
5W27 Arranged Arranged Schmeling, L. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 14/30

Credits: 5

Expands on algebraic topics including solving equations and inequalities, graphing of linear and nonlinear equations, and rational expressions. Develops topics including roots and radicals; solving absolute value equations and inequalities; solving quadratic, exponential and logarithmic equations; and introduction to functions. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 91. .

Note:

These courses are self-paced labs, which gives students the opportunity to finish the course in a higher math than what they started in based upon the amount of work achieved by the students. These are ideal for those needing the extra help, since these classes also have assigned tutors.;

Learn about CPTC's Self-Paced Labs.

Self-Paced Labs: 5W34, 5W36, 5W37, 5W38, 5W39.

Course Outcomes

  • Solve multiple step equations and inequalities
  • Simplify radical expressions
  • Solve radical equations
  • Solve quadratic equations
  • Graph linear and quadratic functions
  • Recognize and graph exponential functions
  • Solve exponential and logarithmic equations
  • Solve nonlinear systems

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

MAT 103

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0518 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Stultz, D. Bldg. 14, Rm. 212 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 25/30

Credits: 5

Develops elements of algebra applied to percentages, markup and markdown, discounts, payroll, and simple and compound interest. Scientific calculator required. Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS placement score (algebra 62 or above or, college algebra 40 or above) or successful completion of MAT 088 or MAT 091.

MATH FOR INDUSTRIAL PROFESSIONS

MAT 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0517 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Hendrickson, A. South Hill Campus Room 116 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $25 5/30
0516 3 p.m. 3:55 p.m. Herring, B. Bldg. 15, Rm. 111 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 In-Person $4.75 24/30

Credits: 5

Develops elements of algebra, geometry, metric measure, and trigonometry to calculate areas, volumes, and angles for polygonal objects, objects with smooth curves, and composite objects. With applications to material strength, tapers, pulleys, gears, screw threads, and elementary engines. Scientific calculator required. Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS placement score (algebra 62 or above or, college algebra 40 or above) or successful completion of MAT 088 or MAT 091.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform basic mathematical operations that require problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Express mathematical ideas orally and in writing by using appropriate mathematical terminology/symbols; read, understand, evaluate, and solve mathematical expressions and relations
  • Use estimation to check the reasonableness of results, especially those obtained by technology
  • Solve algebraic equations, use formulas, calculate areas and volumes, and apply trigonometric functions to solve problems that have real-world application
  • Recognize similarities and discriminate differences among mathematical expressions and relations
  • Recognize connections between mathematical areas like algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, and their applications to industrial disciplines

MATH FOR HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

MAT 108

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0519 Arranged Arranged Sweerus, N. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 30/30
0520 Arranged Arranged Sweerus, N. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 30/30

Credits: 5

Develops elements of algebra including quadratic equations with real roots and unit conversion processes applied to U. S. and metric measure, calculation of dosages and intravenous infusions. Covers solutions and dilutions, elementary chemical calculations, and elementary non-linear functions. Scientific calculator required. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 91.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform mathematical operations that require problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Express mathematical, physical, and chemical ideas orally and in writing by using appropriate mathematical terminology/symbols; read, understand, and evaluate mathematical expressions and physical and chemical statements
  • Use computation, estimation, and ratios to solve problems and check the reasonableness of these results
  • Solve algebraic equations, use formulas, and solve problems that have health related program application
  • Recognize relationships and discriminate differences among mathematical, physical, and chemical expressions and relations
  • Recognize connections between mathematical areas via basic mathematics, algebra, and statistics, and their applications to other disciplines
  • Define and identify arithmetic, algebraic, statistical, physical, and chemical terms and apply problem-solving skills involving them

MATH FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS

MAT 110

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0521 Arranged Arranged Sweerus, N. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 5/30

Credits: 5

Covers a variety of topics including probability, statistics, finance, modeling, sets and counting, matrix operations, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 99.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform mathematical operations that require problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Express mathematical ideas orally and in writing by using appropriate mathematical terminology/symbols; read, understand, evaluate, and solve mathematical expressions and relations
  • Use estimation to check the reasonableness of results, especially those obtained by technology solve algebraic equations; calculate probabilities, make inferences based on elementary statistical methods, solve problems involving simple and compound interest, solve problems involving exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Recognize similarities and discriminate differences among mathematical expressions and relations
  • Recognize connections between mathematical areas like algebra, set theory, probability, and statistics
  • Apply arithmetic, algebraic, and transcendental expressions, equations, and functions to solve problems in finance, exponential growth and decay, and logarithmic scales

PRE CALCULUS I

MATH&141

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0523 10:20 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Hendrickson, A. Bldg. 16, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 6/30
0522 1:50 p.m. 2:45 p.m. Schmeling, L. Bldg. 16, Rm. 208 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 8/30

Credits: 5

Covers linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions and equations; composite functions, linear and quadratic inequalities, graphs of functions, relations, and inequalities; and graphic transformations. Introduces limits, linear and quadratic curve fitting, and mathematical modeling including exponential growth and decay. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 99.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform mathematical operations that require problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Express mathematical ideas orally and in writing by using appropriate mathematical terminology/symbols; read, understand, and evaluate mathematical expressions
  • Use computation and estimation to solve problems and check the reasonableness of these results, especially those obtained by technology
  • Solve algebraic and transcendental equations and inequalities, graph algebraic and transcendental functions, and solve problems involving polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions that have real-world application
  • Recognize similarities and discriminate differences among mathematical expressions and relations
  • Recognize connections between algebraic and transcendental expressions and relations and their applications to other disciplines
  • Define and identify algebraic and transcendental expressions and relations and apply problem-solving skills involving them

PRE CALCULUS 2

MATH&142

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0524 Arranged Arranged Schmeling, L. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 3/30

Credits: 5

Covers circular, trigonometric, and inverse-trigonometric functions and graphs; trigonometric and inverse trigonometric identities; trigonometric equations; vectors and elementary vector operations; De Moivre’s theorem and equations with complex solutions; and polar and parametric equations and their graphs. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MATH& 141 or equivalent.

Course Outcomes

  • Perform mathematical operations that require problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Express mathematical ideas orally and in writing by using appropriate mathematical terminology/symbols; read, understand, and evaluate mathematical expressions
  • Use computation and estimation to solve problems and check the reasonableness of these results, especially those obtained by technology
  • Solve trigonometric, vector, parametric, and polar equations and inequalities, and systems of equations and inequalities and apply skills involving these to real-world applications
  • Recognize similarities and discriminate differences among mathematical expressions and relations
  • Recognize connections between expressions and relations specific to trigonometric, vector, parametric, polar, and matrix forms and their applications to other disciplines
  • Define and identify trigonometric, vector, parametric, polar, and matrix expressions and relations and apply problem-solving skills involving them

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS

MATH&146

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0525 Arranged Arranged Sweerus, N. Online July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Online $25 17/30

Credits: 5

Descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency, dispersion or variation, and skewness. The student is introduced to basic concepts in probability, as well as discrete and continuous probability distribution functions. Statistical inference includes sampling, elementary experimental design, and hypothesis testing using normal, Student’s t, and F-distributions; linear regression and correlation; and the chi-square distribution. Graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement score or successful completion of MAT 099 is required.

Course Outcomes

  • Compute and apply measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • Construct Statistical charts, tables, and graphs
  • Perform elementary computations in probability; mutually exclusive and complementary events, statistical independence, conditionality, and rules of addition and multiplication
  • Apply the central limit theorem to hypothesis testing and determination of confidence limits
  • Demonstrate facility with discrete probability distributions including the general, binomial, and hypergeometric
  • Describe parameters of the Gaussian Distribution and their use in problem solving
  • Clearly delineate the steps of hypothesis testing and their applications
  • Estimate population parameters with sample statistics
  • Perform hypothesis testing for comparison of means, variances, proportions, as well as for single population means and proportions
  • Perform linear regression analysis, including fitting regression lines and interpreting linear correlation coefficients
  • Communicate problems, methods of solution, and their reasonableness to a diverse audience of technically oriented people

SHOP SAFETY

MCH 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7801 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 July 10, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/9

Credits: 2

Provides an overview of the program, orientation to shop procedures, and the responsibilities associated with personal safety and the safety of others. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly apply machine shop rules, regulations and procedures
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to recognize safe and unsafe work practices in a shop
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform their job in a manner that is safe for themselves and for other workers

SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT

MCH 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7811 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 6

Provides a review of basic arithmetic, using addition, subtraction, fractions, and decimal fractions. Study of drawings and prints, and an overview of basic measuring tools. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform basic arithmetic
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to describe what a print is, parts of a print, and line usage
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify, select, and properly use basic measuring tools

SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT II

MCH 107

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7841 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 6/18

Credits: 6

Provides study of basic geometry concepts and introduction to calculators. Advanced study of prints and reading of machine details. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly apply basic geometry concepts
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform basic operations on calculators
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify and apply machine details on prints

SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT III

MCH 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7871 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 6

An introduction to trigonometric functions, practical machine mathematical applications, the Cartesian coordinate system, geometric dimensioning, and tolerancing. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform and apply right triangle trigonometric functions
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to assess and perform practical machine mathematical operations
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to define the meaning of geometric symbols on a print

SHOP MACHINE AND TOOLS

MCH 111

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7821 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 6

Use and care of hand and machine tools used in measurement, layout and inspection. Beginning machine tool operation of pedestal grinders, drill presses and power saws. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly select and use various hand tools, properly, and in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly operate drilling machines in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly operate power saws in a safe manner

LATHES I

MCH 117

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7831 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 6

Progressively difficult operations on lathes with emphasis on setups, speeds and feeds, turning, facing, grooving, threading, and tapers. Actual turning jobs from industry may be used. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to operate Lathes & Mills in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly identify and state the purpose of the main parts of a Lathe and Milling Machine
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly use lathe and milling machine Cutting Tools

MILLS I

MCH 121

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7851 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 6/18

Credits: 6

Progressively difficult operations on milling machines, with emphasis on setups, speeds and feeds, end milling, side milling, shell milling, drilling, and tapping. Actual machining jobs from industry may be used. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to operate Lathes & Mills in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly identify and state the purpose of the main parts of a Lathe and Milling Machine
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly use lathe and milling machine Cutting Tools

SAFETY IN THE WORKPLACE

MCH 122

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7861 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 6/18

Credits: 8

Intermediate calculations and machining operations with emphasis on accessories for lathes and milling machines. Actual machining jobs from industry may be used. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly operate Lathes & Mills in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to calculate the proper speeds and feeds for lathes and milling machines
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly identify and state the purpose of various lathe and milling accessories
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform and apply intermediate calculations and setups on lathes and mills

LATHES & MILLS III

MCH 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7881 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 6/18

Credits: 10

Progressively advanced turning and milling techniques with emphasis placed on precision setup using geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly operate Lathes & Mills in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform and apply advanced calculations and setups on lathes and mills
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly machine internal diameters, groves, and threads, on a lathe

LATHES & MILLS IV

MCH 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78A1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 8

Progressively advanced turning and milling techniques with emphasis placed on the use of all shop equipment to complete advanced precision projects. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly operate Lathes & Mills in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly perform indexing operations on milling machines
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly perform taper turning on a lathe
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly perform gear-cutting operations on milling machines

SURFACE GRINDING

MCH 129

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
7891 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 4

Progressively difficult grinding operations with emphasis on surface grinding, mounting, dressing and truing grinding machine wheels. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to operate surface grinders surface grinders in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly identify major component parts of a surface grinding machine
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to select the correct grinding wheel for each type of work material
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly true and dress a grinding wheel on the surface grinder
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly set-up and operate a surface grinder

TOOL & CUTTER GRINDER

MCH 133

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78B1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 5/18

Credits: 5

Progressively difficult tool and cutter grinding with emphasis on milling cutters, reamers and form tools. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to operate the universal tool and cutter grinder in a safe manner
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly identify and state the purposes of the main parts of a tool and cutter grinder
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to correctly define milling cutter nomenclature
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to select the proper grinding wheel to be used for each type of cutter
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly set up and operate a tool and cutter grinder
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to properly grind clearance angles on end milling cutters and reamers

CATIA I

MCH 201

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78M1 Arranged Arranged Dam, K. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $55 0/18

Credits: 5

Gain introductory knowledge of 3D and parametric design using CATIA V5 software to create basic parts and assemblies in solids and wireframe. Instructor permission required. .

INTRODUCTION TO CNC

MCH 202

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78C1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily Hybrid $55 4/18

Credits: 7

Introduction to CNC programming software and setups using CAD/CAM interfacing and project milling, drilling and lathe turning. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101. .

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify safe and unsafe CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machining procedures
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify the fundamentals of CNC (Computer Numerical Control)
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to perform CNC machining setups
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply basic NC programming
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply basic CAD/CAM

CATIA II

MCH 203

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78N1 Arranged Arranged Dam, K. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $55 0/18

Credits: 3

Build upon modeling and parametric design using CATIA V5 software to apply graphic skills to create parts, assemblies and profiles in solids and wireframe. .

CATIA III

MCH 206

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78P1 Arranged Arranged Dam, K. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged Hybrid $55 0/18

Credits: 3

Apply more advanced modeling and parametric design using CATIA V5 software to create complex parts and assemblies in solids and wireframes. .

MEASUREMENT INSPECTION & EQUIPMENT

MCH 211

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78D1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily Hybrid $55 1/18

Credits: 10

Understanding and operating Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machinery. Writing programs and manual data input. Actual machining jobs from industry may be used. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101. .

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify safe and unsafe CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machining procedures
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply intermediate Programming Fundamentals
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to plan an efficient and safe program with proper sequencing
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to execute a program at the machine
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to define the meanings of various G & M codes as related to CNC machining

ADVANCED CNC

MCH 216

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78H1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 12

Progressively advanced CNC machining techniques with emphasis placed on program troubleshooting and increased production. Actual machining jobs from industry may be used. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101. .

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify safe and unsafe CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machining procedures
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply advanced programming fundamentals
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply the use of multiple tools through manual programming and CAD/CAM software
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to construct 2D & 3D CAD (Computer Aided Design) geometry
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to complete assigned projects applying Mastercam software in design and manufacturing

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

MCH 219

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78F1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/18

Credits: 4

Covers writing a resume, researching employers and job search techniques. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will complete a working resume
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will identify career opportunities
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will research potential employers
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will contact employers and setup a field trip

INSPECTION TECHNIQUES

MCH 223

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78G1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 1/18

Credits: 6

Proper use of inspection tools and equipment. Emphasis is on applied use of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, with use of granite layout surfaces. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to measure heights using a vernier height gage
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to measure heights using gage blocks
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to make angular measurements to an accuracy of 5’ (minutes) of a degree using a sine bar, gage blocks, and a dial indicator
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to demonstrate methods of comparison measurement
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to apply measurement using various gages

METALLURGY & HEAT TREATMENT

MCH 229

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78J1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 4

Provides insight into the study of the properties and compositions of metals. Emphasis is on heat treatment of metals. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to define six properties of metals
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify the effect of alloying elements on steel
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to identify nonferrous metals used in industry
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to select the proper grade of steel for a work piece
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to harden and temper a carbon-steel work piece

MANUFACTURING RESOURCES & RESEARCH

MCH 231

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78K1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $34.75 4/18

Credits: 4

Study of resources for machining information with emphasis on methods of research. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will identify Thread Classifications as they apply to the machinist trade
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to research information as needed regarding Three Methods of Calculating Threads, Bolt Circles, and Indexing Head Rotations
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to research information as needed regarding Threads and Tools Used for Methods of Measurement
  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will be able to research information as needed regarding Alternate Manufacturing Methods, EDM, Laser, Injection Molding, Extrusion Molding

TRAINING & PRACTICE

MCH 240

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
78Q1 Arranged Arranged Dam, K. Arranged July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $30 0/18
78L1 7:05 a.m. 1:50 p.m. Dam, K. Bldg. 25, Rm. 105 July 1, 2015 Aug. 27, 2015 Daily In-Person $30 1/18

Credits: 10

Special instruction to suit the individual’s needs. Repeated enrollment ensures progressively advanced training. The number of times one may enroll is based on the student’s needs, and is at the instructor’s advisement. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Using lecture, lab, and demonstrations, the student will complete special individualized, competency-based training, in an area of instruction as determined by the instructor

AC CIRCUITS

MEC 116

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ41 8 a.m. 9:30 a.m. Staff Bldg. 25, Rm. 103 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/10

Credits: 5

Covers AC circuit analysis. Network theorems are applied to the solution of AC circuits. Resonance, filters, AC power and three-phase circuits are covered in detail. Introduces standard instrumentation used in testing AC circuits and measurement of AC circuits and systems. Discusses wiring techniques for AC power systems. Prerequisites: MEC 115.

Computer Aided Design I

MEC 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ51 12:40 p.m. 3 p.m. Staff Bldg. 19, Rm. 122 July 1, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MW Hybrid $29.75 6/20

Credits: 5

Introduces the use of parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software to design parts working from engineering sketches and/or prototypes.

ELECTRIC MOTORS AND DRIVES

MEC 130

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ61 9:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Staff Bldg. 25, Rm. 103 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/10

Credits: 5

Gives a broad perspective of DC motors, AC motors (both single and three-phase), and Variable Speed Drives. Industrial applications of Variable Speed Drives for constant torque, constant horsepower, and variable torque/variable horsepower are covered. Stepper Motors and Servo Motors are discussed along with their advantages and applications. Prerequisites: MEC 115.

ELECTRIC MOTORS AND DRIVES

MEC 150

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
MQ71 12 p.m. 1:30 p.m. Staff Bldg. 25, Rm. 103 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $29.75 4/10

Credits: 5

Gives a broad perspective of DC motors, AC motors (both single and three-phase), and Variable Speed Drives. Industrial applications of Variable Speed Drives for constant torque, constant horsepower, and variable torque/variable horsepower are covered. Stepper Motors and Servo Motors are discussed along with their advantages and applications. Prerequisites: MEC 115.

IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY

MLT 214

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4821 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Guinn, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 222 Aug. 5, 2015 Aug. 18, 2015 Daily Hybrid $25 14/16

Credits: 6

Applies the principles of antigens and antibodies covered in MLT 210 to red blood cell antigens and antibodies, with emphasis on blood banking procedures, and culminating in performance of pre-transfusion cross matching. This course is offered summer quarter. Prerequisite: MLT 210.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Correctly correlate the principles of immunology studied in the previous course with blood group antigens and antibodies, using lecture notes, reading assignments, references and medical dictionary
  • List the major genes, antigens, and antibodies of the ABO system and explain the modes of inheritance of the major ABO blood groups correctly using the terms gene, antigen, genotype, and phenotype; describe the development of ABO antigens on cells, explaining the effect of the Secretor gene on the expression of antigens in body fluids, and stating the principles of testing including temperature of reactivity, and antibody class involved
  • Correctly interpret the results of ABO (forward and reverse) and Rh typing and identify discrepancies
  • State the most common causes of ABO discrepancies and the procedures used to resolve them
  • List the major genes, antigens, and antibodies of the CDE system and explain the modes of inheritance within this system, testing performed to determine the presence or absence of the antigens, the mode of reactivity of the antibodies, antibody class involved and, given a phenotype, determine the Rh genotype in both Fisher-Race and Wiener
  • Describe, in classroom discussion, the development of Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn (HDFN) including: maternal testing which should be performed, antibody class involved, signs and symptoms (both in-utero and at birth), most commonly implicated blood group antibodies, related tests for detection and determining the severity in maternal, fetal and newborn samples and prevention
  • Describe the product known as Rh Immune Globulin (RhiG) and list and describe the principle of tests performed to determine if a woman is RhiG candidate and dose to administer including: cord blood type (including weak D), OAT on infant, maternal antibody screen, D type (including weak D), fetal bleed screen (rosette) and Kleihauer-Betke stain
  • Describe the principle of the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) and the direct antiglobulin test (OAT), including: application, how they are performed, what constitutes a positive reaction, interpretation, the clinical significance of a positive or negative test, the phenotypic makeup of screen and panel cells and causes of false positives and negatives
  • List the antigens to which patients most frequently make unexpected antibodies including: temperature of reactivity, antibody class involved, dosage reaction and tests performed to confirm their presence
  • Accurately list the tests performed on donor blood at the blood collection center
  • List at least ten components of whole blood, giving their shelf life, storage requirements, anticoagulant and preservatives used for collection, types of baas used for collection and therapeutic uses of each
  • Describe the specimen collection procedures for pre- transfusion compatibility testing, including identification and the use of blood bank armband systems, types of samples required for different tests performed, causes of rejection and list potential sources of error in any blood banking procedure
  • List and describe the principle of all tests which must be included in pre-transfusion compatibility testing including, interpretation, type of sample required, the correct selection of ABO compatible components when the patient's type is not available and potential sources of error
  • Correctly explain and compare, in classroom discussion, the causes and course of hemolytic transfusion reactions, both immediate and delayed, list the tests performed to diagnose, and the significance of positive or abnormal results obtained
  • Correctly explain, in classroom discussion, the development of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions and their causes, including febrile and allergic reactions, bacterial sepsis, infectious diseases, GVHD, and TRALI, as above
  • Work cooperatively with others when performing laboratory work; share reagents, space, small tools, and time on instruments without contention

CLINICAL BLOOD BANKING

MLT 216

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4831 Arranged Arranged Arranged Bldg. 21, Rm. 222 Aug. 19, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $25 14/16

Credits: 5

Experience a mock clinical training rotation in blood banking under the direction of a currently practicing blood banking specialist. Building on the procedures mastered in MLT 214, students will solve real-world blood banking problems, including identification of antibodies. They will deal with daily inventory and temperature record-keeping, perform quality assurance procedures, and receive and complete stat orders. This course is presented summer quarter. Prerequisite: MLT 214.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Relate ABO {forward and reverse) and Rh (including Weak D) types to antigen/antibody theory, development of the antigens, patterns of inheritance for ABO and D, routine testing and interpretation of results (including the use of the Rh control) and clinical significance of ABO antibodies
  • Evaluate given reactions or reactions obtained during ABO typing for discrepancies, listing the steps to take in their resolution, list the most common causes of unexpected forward and reverse reactions, and the most common causes of ABO discrepancies
  • List the uses, the action and composition of available reagents, clinical significance of a positive test to diagnose disease states or conditions, causes of false positive and false negative reactions and the resolution of these unexpected reactions, and the possible interferences for the Direct Antiglobulin Test
  • List the components of a routine cord blood workup, noting the clinical significance of each test in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, possible follow-up testing, classifications, clinical symptoms and specific causes of HDFN, and circumstances under which it is ordered
  • Define Rh Immune Globulin (RhoGam), listing indications, in vivo activity, and principles and clinical significance of the blood bank department work-up, to include the Fetal Screen (Rosette Test) and Kleihauer-Betke; relate it to prevention of HDFN and state the results of testing which would indicate a woman was a candidate as well as additional tests to perform, and calculate the proper dose to give
  • Define the routine Antibody Screen, listing specimen requirements, action and composition of reagents, principle of the test, phases of testing, methodologies, and significant antibodies detected, relating a positive result to principles of immunity as well as potential consequences for the recipient if antigen positive blood was transfused
  • Differentiate the Antibody Identification procedure from the Antibody Screen, and list the steps in the performance and interpretation of a panel, including the distinction between homozygous and heterozygous testing cells, naturally occurring versus immune antibodies including in-vitro reactivity, list the most common blood group antibodies encountered and their clinical significance, define "dosage affect', state the difference between phenotype and genotype, describe the procedure for phenotyping patients and donors for antigens and the procedures for selecting blood for patients with clinically significant antibodies
  • List the steps in pre-transfusion testing, including patient identification, specimen collection requirements, reasons for specimen rejection, test procedures, donor selection, record-keeping, and specimen storage for both patient and donor samples
  • Define the Major Crossmatch, differentiating it from the Minor Crossmatch, and listing specimen requirements, methodologies, phases of testing, and clinical significance of any reactions
  • List the storage requirements, usage, expiration, compatibility testing requirements, and expected post-transfusion effect for the following components: Platelets, Fresh-Frozen Plasma, Cryoprecipitate, Irradiated products, Leukocyte-Poor Red Cells
  • List the types of transfusion reactions, indicating cause, symptoms, sample requirements, tests used to diagnose and treat, specific steps to take when a patient has a reaction and possible outcomes for the patient
  • Compare and contrast tube-testing with gel testing procedures, following gel demonstration by instructor and/or on field trip visit to an affiliated hospital transfusion
  • Work cooperatively with others when performing phlebotomy; sharing space, equipment, and time in drawing room without contention

MICROBIOLOGY

MLT 217

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4811 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Guinn, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 222 July 6, 2015 Aug. 4, 2015 Daily Hybrid $55 14/16

Credits: 10

Begin with an introduction to bacterial growth, culture requirements, sterilization procedures, and biochemical activity. This introductory material is followed by detailed study of the gram positive cocci, the gram negative cocci, the enterobacteriaceae, and the non-fermentative gram negative bacilli; particular attention is paid to human pathogenic versus normal flora organisms, depending on body site. Identification by classical and packaged systems is followed by susceptibility studies. Brief presentations on anaerobes, parasitology, and mycology conclude the course. This course is offered summer quarter. Prerequisite: MLT 214.

  • Differentiate sterilization from disinfection, describing means for each, and demonstrate in laboratory exercises aseptic technique
  • List five requirements for the in vitro growth of bacteria, defining the terms given in lecture which relate to these requirements, and describe the 4 phases of a bacterial colony's growth curve
  • Correctly define and differentiate the following terms related to bacteria and host-parasite relationships
    • Prokaryote
    • Parasite Eukaryote
    • Opportunist Protista
    • Pathogen Saprophyte
    • Mutual Symbiont Commensal
  • Sketch and correctly label the five morphological forms of bacteria, from memory, following lecture, and having completed the assigned reading
  • List the microbial mechanisms of pathogenicity, virulence factors and mechanisms by which normal flora may become opportunistic pathogens, as provided by the textbook, relating to specific organisms studied
  • Correctly use the terms given in the text to describe colonial morphology in laboratory exercises
  • List the components of the Gram Stain, describing the action of each, and the color reaction determining an organism's categorization as Gram Positive or Gram Negative
  • List and describe all media discussed in class and/or used in the laboratory, correctly designating its class, listing its significant components, preparation, abbreviation and noting specific uses
  • State correctly the genus and species, Gram stain reaction, morphology, atmospheric requirements, major biochemical reactions, unique characteristics, the disease or infections caused, most common site of infection, and pathogenicity of the genera of organisms listed below this table*
  • Correctly describe the appearance and biochemical activities of organisms as they may be demonstrated on a variety of differential media and individual tests. State the principle and purpose of the following biochemical tests: coagulase, catalase, hemolysis, beta-lactamase, CAMP, reverse CAMP, bile esculin hydrolysis, hippurate hydrolysis, salt tolerance, optochin susceptibility, PYR, bacitracin susceptibility, novobiocin susceptibility, Elek diffusion test, IMViC, CTA, Elek's Test, X & V factors, urea agar, oxidase production, lactose fermentation, H2S production, glucose utilization, indole, citrate, motility, and urease activity
  • Describe the performance of the Kirby- Bauer susceptibility testing; compare and contrast the information derived from Kirby-Bauer susceptibility testing and from MIG testing, following performance of both procedures in the student laboratory, and using lecture notes and reading assignments
  • Accurately list the major pathogens isolated from the following sources: naming the specific infection and its usual treatment, primary plating media, and specimen collection requirements:
    • Urine
    • Throat/Nasopharynx
    • Ear drainage
    • Genital
    • Spinal fluid
    • Feces
    • Blood
    • Burns
    • Sputum
    • Eye
  • Wound drainage, deep and superficial
  • For blood cultures state: the proper method of collection, best times of collection, media used for growth, purpose of different chemicals present in the media, method for working UP Wme, appearance
  • Correctly complete the worksheet on Mycobacteria, using the reading assignment in the text, and following lecture Presentation
  • Correctly complete the worksheet on Mycology, using the reading assignment in the text, and following lecture presentation
  • Prepare and present an oral report on an assigned group of parasites. Student may use text parasitology chapters, reference texts provided by the instructor, overhead life cycle diagrams, internet sources, and preserved clinical specimens. Report must be followed by a 10-point quiz for the class, with all students earning a grade of 70% or better
  • Work cooperatively with others when performing laboratory work; share reagents, space, small tools, and time on instruments without contention
    • Bacillus Francisella Proteus
    • Bacteroides
    • Haemophilus
    • Providentia
    • Bordetella
    • Klebsiella
    • Pseudomonas
    • Brucella
    • Legionella
    • Salmonella
    • Campylobacter
    • Listeria
    • Serratia
    • Citrobacter
    • Moraxella
    • Shigella
    • Clostridium
    • Mycobacterium
    • Staphylococcus
    • Corynebacterium
    • Neisseria
    • Streptococcus
    • Edwardsiella
    • Pasteurella
    • Vibrio
    • Eikenella
    • Peptococcus
    • Yersinia
    • Erwinia

URINALYSIS

MLT 218

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4801 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Guinn, D. Bldg. 21, Rm. 222 July 1, 2015 July 10, 2015 Daily Hybrid $55 14/16

Credits: 3

Perform routine urine analysis, both macroscopic and microscopic, with attention to abnormal results and their possible cause. An overview of the anatomy and physiology of the excretory system, and the normal and abnormal constituents of urine accompany laboratory practice. This course is presented summer quarter. Prerequisite: MLT 217.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • List the components of the chain of infection and the laboratory safety precautions that break the chain
  • Discuss the components and purpose of chemical hygiene plans, quality assessment, PPE, and material safety data sheets
  • Recognize standard hazard warning symbols and explain actions that need to be taken regarding laboratory safety
  • Identify the components and describe the functions of the nephron, kidney, and excretory system and list and describe diseases and disorders associated with them including laboratory tests used to diagnose and treat
  • Describe the process and conditions of glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption and secretion, and renal blood flow and list and describe diseases, disorders, diagnosis and treatment associated with the renal system, including the four basic classifications of renal disease, and tests used to diagnose these conditions
  • List the three major organic and inorganic chemical constituents of urine and state the normal urine values used for diagnosis and treatment of diseases, including descriptive terms for volume, appearance, and constituents of urine using correct units of measure including, but not limited to, WBC, RBC, epithelial cells, crystals, bacteria, yeast, parasites, protein, glucose, creatinine, pH, bilirubin, urobilinogen, nitrites, leukocyte esterase, specific gravity, HCG, Bence-Janes protein, crystals, casts and urine toxicology and state results of testing which may indicate a sample for toxicology has been adulterated
  • Discuss the glomerulus filtration tests and their advantages and disadvantages
  • State the clinical reference standards and methods for urinalysis and osmometry, and how the specific gravity helps to determine the patient's condition
  • Discuss the symptoms and results of laboratory testing for conditions that are caused by either a defect in pancreatic production or insulin or a decrease in the production or function of antidiuretic hormone
  • Describe the type of specimen and method of collection needed for optimal results for fasting, random, clean catch, catheterized, 24 hour samples and routine drug screening, storage temperatures, method of labeling, length of time a sample may be left at room temperature, specific changes to analytes which occur when a sample is stored improperly, most commonly ordered tests, and possible reasons the laboratory would reject a specimen
  • State the clinical significance, methods used, terms used to describe, proper method for examining and causes of a urine's color, acidity, appearance, odor, pH, specific gravity, and the chemical testing
  • Describe the proper technique for performing reagent strip testing, including interpretation of results, expected values, confirmatory testing including under what circumstances they are performed, how to properly interpret test results, description of the principle of the test, substances which may interfere in chemical

PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF CLEANING AND DISINFECTION

MMN 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8301 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Wagers, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 107 July 1, 2015 July 16, 2015 MTWTh Web-Enhanced $25 9/20

Credits: 6

Classroom and laboratory experience in the fundamentals of cleaning and disinfection. Topics include water quality, water purification systems, chemical cleaning and disinfecting agents, handling and transporting of patient care equipment, and general cleaning protocols for instruments and equipment. The proper and safe handling of infectious waste is included. Prerequisite: MMN 103, 106, 109, 124.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75% be able to identify the fundamental concepts of cleaning, decontamination, and disinfection. Differentiate the differences between the three processes
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, identify various chemicals and their properties as used in cleaning, decontamination, and disinfection Identify the appropriate chemicals to use for a variety of situations and materials
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, the internet, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, be able to decontaminate all types of equipment, including instruments, powered equipment, and endoscopes. An understanding of various washers/decontaminators will be demonstrated
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, be able to identify factors that impact water quality and their effects on common materials found in the Central Service Department
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, be able to explain the basics of distillation, deionization, and reverse osmosis water purification systems, including the effects of each
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, have an understanding of the safety and prevention issues associated with the chemicals and equipment used in the decontamination process
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, explain the management of infectious waste

PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES OF STERILIZATION

MMN 129

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8311 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Wagers, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 107 July 16, 2015 Aug. 6, 2015 MTWTh Web-Enhanced $25 9/20

Credits: 6

Classroom and laboratory experience in the packaging, assembly, and sterilization of procedural trays, instrument sets, and sterile supplies. Major topics include methods of high- and low-temperature sterilization, sterilization chemicals, and packaging materials. Guidelines for point of use processing are discussed. Operations, parameters, and maintenance of various sterilizers are included, as well as monitoring of the sterilization process and quality control. Proper storage and storage concerns for sterile supplies are included. Prerequisite: MMN 103, 106, 109, 124, 126.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, identify and explain the various methods of high and low temperature sterilization, and the parameters, advantages, disadvantages, and safety concerns associated with each
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, demonstrate the knowledge and skills of proper loading, operation, and unloading of various sterilizers in the lab
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, be able to identify the principles and methods of packaging and types of packaging materials. The student will demonstrate proper packaging and wrapping of various items for the appropriate method of sterilization
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, lab and clinical practice, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, demonstrate knowledge of special considerations for proper storage and handling of sterile supplies
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, lab and clinical practice, the student will at a minimum level of 70%, explain the differences in properties and usage of chemical, biological, and technical control indicators. The importance of thorough record keeping will be learned

MATERIEL MANAGEMENT/CENTRAL SERVICE APPLICATIONS

MMN 131

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8321 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Wagers, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 107 Aug. 6, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 MTWTh Web-Enhanced $25 9/20

Credits: 4

Overview of the handling and distribution of materiels in a medical facility. Inventory management, replenishment methods, and tracking systems are included. Students become familiar with quality assurance measures and techniques. Prerequisite: MMN 103, 106, 109, 124, 126, 129.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, identify the essential principles associated with the distribution of supplies and equipment. Identify and explain the differences among the various replenishment systems found in healthcare
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, define terms associated with inventory management and identify key principles associated with inventory control
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, the internet, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, be able to differentiate between disposable and reusable items
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, identify available tracking methods and the purpose of tracking instruments and equipment
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, understand the definition of quality. Identify the different quality control methods available, who the customers are, and what impact customer service has in the healthcare setting
  • Utilizing textbook, lecture, video, discussion, and lab, the student will, at a minimum level of 75%, describe the differences in guidelines for Ambulatory Surgery Centers and VA facilities as they compare to guidelines for other acute hospitals

JOB SKILLS

MMN 210

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
8331 8 a.m. 9 a.m. Wagers, J. Bldg. 21, Rm. 107 July 1, 2015 Aug. 24, 2015 MTWTh Hybrid $120 9/20

Credits: 1

Using the online classroom, this self-paced hybrid course will guide the student to prepare a resume, cover letter, and application. Interviewing tips and techniques will be covered, as well as the online application process. Students will return to the classroom the last two to three days of the class to demonstrate clear understanding of the process and to be given job search information. Prerequisite: Completion of MMN 103, 106, 109, 124, 126, 129, 131.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  • Utilizing handouts, the internet, and online discussion, the student will prepare a letter of introduction, a resume, and a thank you letter
  • Utilizing handouts, lecture, the internet, and discussion, the student will demonstrate an understanding of the interview process, including appropriate conduct before, during, and after, as well as knowledge of appropriate dress and posture
  • Utilizing the internet, newspapers, and other resources, the student will provide current job market information for positions available to them relative to the training the program has provided
  • MMN 213
  • Participate as a member of the health care team on a student level
  • Demonstrate principles of professional appearance, conduct, and attendance according to program standards
  • Apply Central Service, Sterile Processing, and Materiel Management concepts to clinical practice
  • Use Standard Precautions at all times
  • Utilize criticism to improve performance
  • Maintain confidentiality of patients, staff, peers and health care facility

FUNDAMENTALS OF WELDING FOR NON WELDING MAJOR

MS 123

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0901 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Staff South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $45 5/20

Credits: 5

Identify, perform or witness various basic welding processes for prospective visual and non-destructive inspectors.

FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITES FOR THE NON-COMPOSITE MAJOR

MS 126

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0911 9 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Evans, D. South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $45 5/20

Credits: 4

Introduces the various kinds of composite parts. Explore the different types of resin, matrices, fibers, cores and laminates. Explore their mechanical properties and the advantages of each type of composite structures. Covers the layup, winding, molding, curing and repair of composite parts. Explore the role of NDT in testing composite parts after fabrication and after repair and the kinds of defects found.

BLUEPRINT READING FUNDAMENTALS

MS 131

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0921 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Staff South Hill Campus Room 115 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $25 6/20

Credits: 3

Covers basic lines and views of drawings, identifying and interpreting weld and fabrication symbols, and locating NDT requirements.

MUSIC APPRECIATION

MUSC&105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0549 Arranged Arranged WAOL Online June 25, 2015 Aug. 19, 2015 Arranged Online $25 14/25

Credits: 5

Learn about elements of music, that is, the building blocks: pitch, melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, timbre and dynamics. Study the evolution of music through the ages. This will not be a music history class, but rather an investigation of how music changed through time. Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/ SLEP score; or successful completion of ENG 094 is required.

Course Outcomes

  • Read and explain selected portions of a printed program from a formal symphony, choral, wind ensemble concert or opera
  • Identify standard musical instruments, voice categories and forms
  • Analyze and discuss in groups specific works of music in terms of form and structure, timbre, character, melody, harmony, texture and rhythm
  • Identify elements of musical structure from listening assignments (melody, harmony, rhythm, texture and dynamics)
  • Discuss in group work, the additional readings by Danziger, Copland and Green, applying information accrued in course work and text reading
  • Identify specific works from and assigned list by listening

NURSING ASSISTANT THEORY

NAC 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
NS01 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Hernandez, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 211 July 1, 2015 July 17, 2015 Daily Web-Enhanced $35 15/40

Credits: 6

The Nursing Assistant Certified Program prepares students for employment as a basic patient care provider under the supervision of a professional licensed provider such as a Registered Nurse. This course is an introduction to the role and responsibilities of being a Nursing Assistant. Prerequisites: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds. This occupation requires medium physical activity and lifting/handling objects weighing up to 50 pounds. Nursing assistants are often standing for long periods of time. For safety and protection of patients, the student nurse must be able to perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in stressful and/or emergency situations. Students must be able to safely assist a patient in moving from bed to a chair, commode, or cart. Students must sign an affidavit that they meet the physical requirements before they can be placed in a clinical setting.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify the functions and role of a nursing assistant in a long-term care facility
  • Discuss the Omnibus budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements for nursing assistant training
  • Define types of abuse and neglect and describe the signs that indicate abuse and neglect
  • List the types of transmission of infection precautions that are to be used in addition to standard precautions
  • Describe ways a nursing assistant can most effectively prevent the spread of any communicable disease including AIDS/HIV
  • Describe the influences of culture in the resident’s response to health, wellness and illness
  • Identify the age-related changes and abnormalities of the body systems
  • Identify the different common and therapeutic diets
  • Demonstrate accurate measuring and recording of food and fluid intake and output
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of medical terminology and abbreviations
  • Identify the causes and preventative measures of pressure ulcers
  • Describe the signs and symptoms and actions for airway obstruction in the responsive and unresponsive victim
  • Describe and demonstrate the steps of CPR

NURSING SKILL FUNDAMENTALS

NAC 102

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
NS11 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m. Hernandez, K. Bldg. 21, Rm. 137 July 17, 2015 Aug. 28, 2015 Arranged In-Person $14 9/20
NS21 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m. Sword, Y. Bldg. 21, Rm. 137 July 17, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 Arranged In-Person $14 6/20

Credits: 4

Prepares students for employment as a basic patient care provider under the supervision of professional licensed providers such as a registered nurse. This course includes the minimum requirements for skill competencies. Students must correctly demonstrate 100% of the steps for each skill tested. Students will not be allowed to participate in the final skills exam unless attendance for all clinical hours has been fulfilled. Prerequisites: Documentation of required immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 pounds, and no record on file from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS. Successful completion of NAC 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate lifting an object using proper body mechanics
  • Demonstrate proper hand-washing techniques
  • Demonstrate proper lifting, moving, positioning and transfer techniques
  • Demonstrate proper range of motion
  • Demonstrate the proper technique and documentation weight, blood pressure, pulse respirations and temperature
  • Demonstrate proper bathing techniques
  • Demonstrate proper personal care and grooming techniques
  • Demonstrate proper techniques of the “NNAAP Skills” identified by regulatory agencies
  • Demonstrate the correct techniques for feeding a client
  • Demonstrate the correct and safe application of TED stockings

UNIT BASED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

NAC 107

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
NS31 Arranged Arranged Hernandez, K. Arranged Aug. 5, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Arranged In-Person $40 15/40

Credits: 3

Prepares students for employment as a basic patient care provider under the supervision of professional licensed providers such as a registered nurse. The course includes content describing principles of documentation, accurate observation, reporting of residents’ conditions, and philosophy of restorative nursing as well as clinical practice experience under the supervision of the NAC instructor. Students must demonstrate skills at an acceptable or exceeds standard level to pass this course. Students must correctly demonstrate 100% of the steps for each skill tested. Students will not be allowed to participate in the final skills exam unless attendance for all clinical hours has been fulfilled. Prerequisites: Documentations of required immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 pounds. Nursing assistants are often standing for long periods of time. For safety and protection of patients, the student nurse must be able to perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in stressful and/or emergency situations. Students must be able to safely assist a patient in moving from bed to a chair, commode, or cart. Students must sign an affidavit that they meet the physical requirements before they can be placed in a clinical setting; have no record on file for crimes against children or vulnerable adults from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS. Successful completion of NAC 101.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate resident care activities including personal care and bathing
  • Demonstrate the practice of standard precautions and their application in the health care setting
  • Identify emergency practices and procedures and their applications in a health care setting
  • Demonstration of the proper techniques of the “NNAAP Skills” identified by regulatory agencies
  • Demonstrate proper techniques for feeding residents

NURSING SKILL FUNDAMENTALS

NAC 131

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
NS1F 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Collar, S. Bldg. 21, Rm. 211 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TWTh In-Person $165 10/20

Credits: 4

Prepares students for employment as a basic patient care provider under the supervision of a professional licensed provider such as a registered nurse. Explore the principles of providing basic patient care; includes the minimum requirements for skill competencies as required under the Washington State and Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements for the Nursing Assistant Training, as well as those fundamental skills required by the Licensed Practical Nurse program. Students must correctly demonstrate 100% of the steps for each of the skills tested. Prerequisites: Documentation of required immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 lbs., and a No Record on File from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate lifting an object using proper body mechanics
  • Demonstrate proper hand-washing techniques
  • Demonstrate proper lifting, moving, positioning and transfer techniques
  • Demonstrate proper range of motion
  • Demonstrate the proper technique and documentation weight, blood pressure, pulse respirations and temperature
  • Demonstrate proper bathing techniques
  • Demonstrate proper personal care and grooming techniques
  • Demonstrate proper techniques of the “NNAAP Skills” identified by regulatory agencies
  • Demonstrate the correct techniques for feeding a client
  • Demonstrate the correct and safe application of TED stockings

UNIT BASED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

NAC 139

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
NS1C Arranged Arranged Collar, S. Arranged Aug. 5, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 TWTh In-Person $14 10/20

Credits: 3

Prepares students for employment as a basic patient care provider under the supervision of professional licensed providers such as registered nurses. The course includes content describing principles of documentation, accurate observation, and reporting of resident’s conditions and philosophy of restorative nursing program as well as clinical practice experience under the supervision of the NAC instructor. Students must demonstrate skills at an acceptable or exceeds-standards level to pass this course. Students must correctly demonstrate at least 100% of the steps for each skill tested. Students will not be allowed to participate in the final skills exam unless attendance for all clinical hours has been fulfilled. Prerequisites: Documentation of required immunizations, no record on file for crimes against children or vulnerable adults from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS. This occupation requires medium physical activity and lifting/handling objects weighing 10-25 pounds (occasionally up to 50 pounds). Nursing assistants are often standing for long periods of time. For safety and protection of patients, the student nurse must be able to perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in stressful and/or emergency situations. Students must be able to safely assist a patient in moving from bed to a chair, commode, or cart. Students must sign an affidavit that they meet the physical requirements before they can be placed in a clinical setting. Successful completion of NAC 1XX, NAC 1XX and NAC 131.

Course Outcomes

  • Demonstrate resident care activities including personal care and bathing
  • Demonstrate the practice of standard precautions and their application in the health care setting
  • Identify emergency practices and procedures and their applications in a health care setting
  • Demonstration of the proper techniques of the “NNAAP Skills” identified by regulatory agencies
  • Demonstrate proper techniques for feeding residents
  • Demonstrate appropriate observation skills and reporting appropriate information to licensed supervisory staff
  • Demonstrate the proper techniques for taking and recording blood pressure, pulse, respiration, temperature and weight

EDDY CURRENT TESTING I

NDT 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0931 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Musson, C. South Hill Campus Room 114 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $45 8/20

Credits: 3

Covers the theory of the production of eddy currents, including electrical concepts. The calibration and operation of eddy current machines will be covered, along with the applications of eddy current testing.

EDDY CURRENT TESTING II

NDT 170

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0941 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Musson, C. South Hill Campus Room 114 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $25 8/20

Credits: 5

Presents advanced theory and application as it relates to depth of penetration, characteristic frequency, and flaw characteristics. Lab exercises prove and reinforce these advanced theories.

EDDY CURRENT TESTING III

NDT 210

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
0951 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Musson, C. South Hill Campus Room 114 July 1, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 Daily In-Person $25 8/20

Credits: 5

Presents the student with advanced eddy current inspection techniques. Advanced applications will include multi-frequency inspection, nuclear tubing inspection, and many aircraft inspection techniques.

IT ESSENTIALS I

NSS 101

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4701 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Morris, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 107 July 1, 2015 July 31, 2015 MWF Web-Enhanced $75 9/30

Credits: 5

Introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to competently install, build, configure, upgrade, troubleshoot and repair PC compatible hardware, including troubleshooting basic networks and Internet connectivity. Additionally, this course will cover the latest memory, bus, peripherals and wireless technologies.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify basic terms, concepts and functions of computer system
  • Identify
  • Understand and describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data networks in IPv4 and IPv6 environments
  • Design, calculate and apply subnet masks and addresses to fulfill given requirements in IPv4 and IPv6 networks

IT ESSENTIALS II

NSS 105

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4711 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Morris, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 107 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF Web-Enhanced $75 8/30

Credits: 4

Introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to competently use, install, configure, upgrade, and troubleshoot current operating systems technologies. Prerequisites: NSS 101 or equivalent knowledge and skills.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe basic internet architecture
  • Describe Internet servers and their functions
  • Identify Internet protocols and their purpose
  • Describe Internet clients and their relationship to Internet servers
  • Identify, use and configure Internet clients
  • Describe basic Internet security issues
  • Identify and use Internet troubleshooting practices
  • Describe Internet, Intranet, Extranet business concepts

CISCO NETWORKING I

NSS 109

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
47N1 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Turner, J. Bldg. 16, Rm. 209 July 1, 2015 Aug. 26, 2015 W Web-Enhanced $75 1/30
4721 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Turner, J. Bldg. 16, Rm. 209 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $75 13/20

Credits: 5

The first of four courses in the new Cisco NetAcad CCNA Routing and Switching curriculum, CCNA1, Networking Basics curriculum, which teaches basics of Ethernet technologies, cabling LANSs and WANS, network media, basics of TCP/IP and IP addressing and routing fundamentals.

Course Outcomes

  • Understand and describe the devices and services used to support communications in data networks and the Internet
  • Understand and describe the role of protocol layers in data networks
  • Understand and describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data networks in IPv4 and IPv6 environments
  • Design, calculate and apply subnet masks and addresses to fulfill given requirements in IPv4 and IPv6 networks
  • Explain fundamental Ethernet concepts such as media, services and operations
  • Build a simple Ethernet network using routers and switches
  • Use Cisco command-line interface (CLI) commands to perform basic router and switch configurations
  • Utilize common network utilities to verify small network operations and analyze data traffic

MS DESKTOP SUPPORT I

NSS 120

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4731 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Lanphier, J. Bldg. 16, Rm. 207 July 1, 2015 July 31, 2015 MWF In-Person $54.75 18/30

Credits: 5

Introduces students to the knowledge, skills, and tasks necessary to troubleshoot basic problems computer users will face while running a desktop operating system.

Course Outcomes

  • Installing and upgrading Microsoft Windows
  • Configuring and troubleshooting Post-installation system settings
  • Configuring Windows security features
  • Configuring network connectivity
  • Configuring applications included with Microsoft Windows
  • Maintaining and optimizing systems that run Microsoft Windows
  • Configuring and troubleshooting mobile computing

MS DESKTOP SUPPORT II

NSS 125

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4741 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Lanphier, J. Bldg. 16, Rm. 207 Aug. 3, 2015 Aug. 31, 2015 MWF In-Person $54.75 18/30

Credits: 4

Introduces students to the knowledge, skills and tasks necessary to troubleshoot basic problems computer users will face related to configuring and maintaining applications running on a desktop operating system. Prerequisites: NSS 120 or equivalent knowledge and skills.

Course Outcomes

  • Deploying Windows
  • Managing Windows Security
  • Managing and Maintaining Systems That Run Windows
  • Configuring and Troubleshooting Networking
  • Supporting and Maintaining Desktop Applications

IMPLEMENTING SYSTEM SECURITY

NSS 135

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4751 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Hollowell, K. Bldg. 16, Rm. 111 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $75 17/30

Credits: 4

Capstone course of general security concepts, communications security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography and organizational security. Includes access, attacks, auditing, vulnerabilities, devices, algorithms, protocols, disaster recover and documentation.

Course Outcomes

  • Identify security threats to a computer system
  • Harden internal IT system and Services
  • Harden internet work devices and services
  • Secure network communications
  • Manage a public key infrastructure
  • Manage certificates
  • Enforce organizational security policy
  • Monitor the security infrastructure

SERVER OS INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION

NSS 139

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4761 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Souza, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 109 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $75 20/30

Credits: 4

Introduces knowledge, skills and tasks necessary to deploy, support, and secure windows server network operating systems in a variety of stand-alone and enterprise network environments. Provides hands-on training for Information Systems Security professionals responsible for managing accounts and resources, maintaining server resources, monitoring server performance, safeguarding data, and securing server network operating systems. Provides guidance for students pursuing industry certification.

Course Outcomes

  • Plan and Install Server Operating Systems
  • Modify, Maintain and Secure System Configurations
  • Configure and Manage hardware devices
  • Configure and secure network configurations
  • Develop and Implement Performance strategies
  • Develop and Implement fault tolerance and recovery
  • Create and manage user and group accounts

INTRO TO DATA ANALYSIS

NSS 140

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4771 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Lanphier, J. Bldg. 16, Rm. 207 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $54.75 18/30

Credits: 5

Introduces the use of software to perform recovery of deleted or corrupted data. Techniques will be used to demonstrate the use of statistical analysis practices to predict or show trends involving security issues of access, crime or loss prevention.

Course Outcomes

  • Intro to the history of computer forensics
  • Intro to the procedures for an investigation
  • Outline physical requirements and equipment
  • How to acquire data
  • Explain search warrants and the nature of the case
  • Discussion of most common operating systems
  • Exploration of most common forensics tools

SHAREPOINT SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

NSS 152

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4781 12 p.m. 3 p.m. Souza, D. Bldg. 16, Rm. 109 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh Web-Enhanced $75 12/30

Credits: 4

Introduces the knowledge and skills necessary for systems administrators to successfully install, manage and support SharePoint services. Successful students will learn and introduction to Administration, Content Management, and configuration of SharePoint services in a variety of network settings. Provides guidance for students pursuing industry certification.

Course Outcomes

  • Describe the purpose of SharePoint Services
  • Install SharePoint
  • Manage Accounts
  • Configure Service Applications
  • Monitor the SharePoint environment
  • Backup and Restore a SharePoint environment

CYBER SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS

NSS 156

Item # Start Time End Time Instructor Location Start Date End Date Days Format Addtl Fee Enrollment
4791 8 a.m. 11 a.m. Morris, C. Bldg. 16, Rm. 107 July 2, 2015 Sept. 1, 2015 TTh In-Person $54.75 10/30

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the evolving field of cybersecurity. Students will learn about common cyber attacks and the techniques used to identify, detect, and defend against cybersecurity threats. They will also gain a basic understanding of personal, physical, network, internet, and enterprise security, as well as a foundation for more advanced study of cybersecurity

Course Outcomes

  • Introduction to Security
  • Desktop Security
  • Internet Security
  • Personal Security
  • Network Security
  • Enterprise Security

INTRODUCTION TO LINUX

NSS 160